Darwinism Democracy and Race

Author: John P Jackson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351810774
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Darwinism, Democracy, and Race examines the development and defence of an argument that arose at the boundary between anthropology and evolutionary biology in twentieth-century America. In its fully articulated form, this argument simultaneously discredited scientific racism and defended free human agency in Darwinian terms. The volume is timely because it gives readers a key to assessing contemporary debates about the biology of race. By working across disciplinary lines, the book’s focal figures--the anthropologist Franz Boas, the cultural anthropologist Alfred Kroeber, the geneticist Theodosius Dobzhansky, and the physical anthropologist Sherwood Washburn--found increasingly persuasive ways of cutting between genetic determinist and social constructionist views of race by grounding Boas’s racially egalitarian, culturally relativistic, and democratically pluralistic ethic in a distinctive version of the genetic theory of natural selection. Collaborators in making and defending this argument included Ashley Montagu, Stephen Jay Gould, and Richard Lewontin. Darwinism, Democracy, and Race will appeal to advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and academics interested in subjects including Philosophy, Critical Race Theory, Sociology of Race, History of Biology and Anthropology, and Rhetoric of Science.

Native American DNA

Author: Kim TallBear
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 0816685797
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Who is a Native American? And who gets to decide? From genealogists searching online for their ancestors to fortune hunters hoping for a slice of casino profits from wealthy tribes, the answers to these seemingly straightforward questions have profound ramifications. The rise of DNA testing has further complicated the issues and raised the stakes. In Native American DNA, Kim TallBear shows how DNA testing is a powerful—and problematic—scientific process that is useful in determining close biological relatives. But tribal membership is a legal category that has developed in dependence on certain social understandings and historical contexts, a set of concepts that entangles genetic information in a web of family relations, reservation histories, tribal rules, and government regulations. At a larger level, TallBear asserts, the “markers” that are identified and applied to specific groups such as Native American tribes bear the imprints of the cultural, racial, ethnic, national, and even tribal misinterpretations of the humans who study them. TallBear notes that ideas about racial science, which informed white definitions of tribes in the nineteenth century, are unfortunately being revived in twenty-first-century laboratories. Because today’s science seems so compelling, increasing numbers of Native Americans have begun to believe their own metaphors: “in our blood” is giving way to “in our DNA.” This rhetorical drift, she argues, has significant consequences, and ultimately she shows how Native American claims to land, resources, and sovereignty that have taken generations to ratify may be seriously—and permanently—undermined.

Science and Scientism in Nineteenth century Europe

Author:
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252074335
Format: PDF
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Exploring the natural scientific foundations of far-reaching social ideologies The nineteenth century produced scientific and cultural revolutions that forever transformed modern European life. Although these critical developments are often studied independently, Richard G. Olson's Science and Scientism in Nineteenth-Century Europe provides an integrated account of the history of science and its impact on intellectual and social trends of the day. Focusing on the natural scientific foundations underlying liberalism, socialism, positivism, communism, and social Darwinism, Olson explores how these movements employed science to clarify their own understanding of Enlightenment ideals, as well as their understanding of progress, religion, industry, imperialism, and racism. Starting with the impact of the French Revolution on scientific thought, Olson engages with key texts from J. B. Say, Henri Saint-Simon, Kant, Goethe, Darwin, Walter Bagehot, and Edward Bellamy to demonstrate the complex set of forces that shaped nineteenth-century thinking.

The Myth of Race

Author: Robert Wald Sussman
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674745302
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Although eugenics is now widely discredited, some groups and individuals claim a new scientific basis for old racist assumptions. Pondering the continuing influence of racist research and thought, despite all evidence to the contrary, Robert Sussman explains why—when it comes to race—too many people still mistake bigotry for science.

Eine kurze Geschichte der Menschheit

Author: Yuval Noah Harari
Publisher: DVA
ISBN: 364110498X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Krone der Schöpfung? Vor 100 000 Jahren war der Homo sapiens noch ein unbedeutendes Tier, das unauffällig in einem abgelegenen Winkel des afrikanischen Kontinents lebte. Unsere Vorfahren teilten sich den Planeten mit mindestens fünf weiteren menschlichen Spezies, und die Rolle, die sie im Ökosystem spielten, war nicht größer als die von Gorillas, Libellen oder Quallen. Vor 70 000 Jahren dann vollzog sich ein mysteriöser und rascher Wandel mit dem Homo sapiens, und es war vor allem die Beschaffenheit seines Gehirns, die ihn zum Herren des Planeten und zum Schrecken des Ökosystems werden ließ. Bis heute hat sich diese Vorherrschaft stetig zugespitzt: Der Mensch hat die Fähigkeit zu schöpferischem und zu zerstörerischem Handeln wie kein anderes Lebewesen. Anschaulich, unterhaltsam und stellenweise hochkomisch zeichnet Yuval Harari die Geschichte des Menschen nach und zeigt alle großen, aber auch alle ambivalenten Momente unserer Menschwerdung.

Encyclopedia of Educational Theory and Philosophy

Author: D. C. Phillips
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 1483364755
Format: PDF, ePub
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Education is a field sometimes beset by theories-of-the-day and with easy panaceas that overpromise the degree to which they can alleviate pressing educational problems. The two-volume Encyclopedia of Educational Theory and Philosophy introduces readers to theories that have stood the test of time and those that have provided the historical foundation for the best of contemporary educational theory and practice. Drawing together a team of international scholars, this invaluable reference examines the global landscape of all the key theories and the theorists behind them and presents them in the context needed to understand their strengths and weaknesses. In addition to interpretations of long-established theories, this work offers essays on cutting-edge research and concise, to-the-point definitions of key concepts, ideas, schools, and figures. Features: Over 300 signed entries by trusted experts in the field are organized into two volumes and overseen by a distinguished General Editor and an international Editorial Board. Entries are followed by cross references and further reading suggestions. A Chronology of Theory within the field of education highlights developments over the centuries; a Reader’s Guide groups entries thematically, and a master Bibliography facilitates further study. The Reader’s Guide, detailed index, and cross references combine for strong search-and-browse capabilities in the electronic version. Available in a choice of print or electronic formats, Encyclopedia of Educational Theory and Philosophy is an ideal reference for anyone interested in the roots of contemporary educational theory.

Sociological Abstracts

Author: Leo P. Chall
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Docs
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CSA Sociological Abstracts abstracts and indexes the international literature in sociology and related disciplines in the social and behavioral sciences. The database provides abstracts of journal articles and citations to book reviews drawn from over 1,800+ serials publications, and also provides abstracts of books, book chapters, dissertations, and conference papers.

ber die Grundlage der Moral

Author: Arthur Schopenhauer
Publisher: Felix Meiner Verlag
ISBN: 3787327835
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In seiner 1839 bei der Dänischen Societät der Wissenschaften eingereichten und 1841 erst mals in dem Band "Die beiden Grundprobleme der Ethik" veröffentlichten Preisschrift über die Grundlage der Moral legt Schopenhauer eine Reihe bemerkenswerter Ergänzungen zu seiner Ethik bzw. Metaphysik der Sitten vor. In keinem anderen seiner Werke setzt er sich so ausführlich mit Kants Ethik auseinander, die er einerseits als bedeutende Leistung würdigt, an derseits aber auch einer gründlichen und - in vielen Punkten - überzeugenden Kritik unter wirft. Ein zentraler Einwand lautet, daß der kategorische Imperativ letzten Endes einem kalkulierten Egoismus entspringe. Damit wäre er kein formales, sondern ein materiales Prinzip, und er würde nicht kategorisch, sondern allenfalls hypothetisch gelten. Darüber hinaus weist Schopenhauer die "imperative Form" der Kantischen Ethik als unangemessen zurück. Nach seiner Auffassung besteht die Aufgabe der Ethik keineswegs darin, Vorschriften aufzustellen, nach denen sich die Menschen zu richten hätten, sondern lediglich darin, deren Verhalten zu beschreiben und verständlich zu machen. Was seine eigene Konzeption der Ethik anbelangt, so läuft sie darauf hinaus, daß das Mitleid die Grundlage der Moral bildet. Schopenhauer charakterisiert es als ein Gefühl, in dem einem Menschen das Leiden des Anderen ebenso unmittelbar zugänglich ist wie das eigene und das ihn dazu motiviert, den Anderen zum letzten Zweck des Handelns zu machen. Vor diesem Hintergrund entwickelt Schopenhauer seine eigene Tugendlehre, in deren Mittelpunkt die Gerechtigkeit und die Menschenliebe stehen.