Deaf in Japan

Author: Karen Nakamura
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801473562
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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A groundbreaking study of deaf identity, minority politics, and sign language, traces the history of the deaf community in Japan.

Deaf in Japan

Author: Karen Nakamura
Publisher: Cornell Univ Pr
ISBN: 9780801443503
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Until the mid-1970s, deaf people in Japan had few legal rights and little social recognition. Legally, they were classified as minors or mentally deficient, unable to obtain driver's licenses or sign contracts and wills. Many worked at menial tasks or wer

Many Ways to be Deaf

Author: Leila Frances Monaghan
Publisher: Gallaudet University Press
ISBN: 9781563681356
Format: PDF
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Twenty-four international scholars contribute articles on linguistic and cultural diversity in deaf communities worldwide, including Japan, Viet Nam, Nigeria, Ireland, Brazil, and the United States. The wide- ranging topics include the evolution of British fingerspelling beginning in the 17th centur

The SAGE Deaf Studies Encyclopedia

Author: Genie Gertz
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 1506300774
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The time has come for a new in-depth encyclopedic collection of articles defining the current state of Deaf Studies at an international level and using the critical and intersectional lens encompassing the field. The emergence of Deaf Studies programs at colleges and universities and the broadened knowledge of social sciences (including but not limited to Deaf History, Deaf Culture, Signed Languages, Deaf Bilingual Education, Deaf Art, and more) have served to expand the activities of research, teaching, analysis, and curriculum development. The field has experienced a major shift due to increasing awareness of Deaf Studies research since the mid-1960s. The field has been further influenced by the Deaf community’s movement, resistance, activism and politics worldwide, as well as the impact of technological advances, such as in communications, with cell phones, computers, and other devices. A major goal of this new encyclopedia is to shift focus away from the “Medical/Pathological Model” that would view Deaf individuals as needing to be “fixed” in order to correct hearing and speaking deficiencies for the sole purpose of assimilating into mainstream society. By contrast, The Deaf Studies Encyclopedia seeks to carve out a new and critical perspective on Deaf Studies with the focus that the Deaf are not a people with a disability to be treated and “cured” medically, but rather, are members of a distinct cultural group with a distinct and vibrant community and way of being.

Deaf Around the World

Author: Gaurav Mathur
Publisher: OUP USA
ISBN: 019973254X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The articles in Deaf around the World offer an introduction to deaf studies and the study of signed languages.

The Deaf Way

Author: Carol Erting
Publisher: Gallaudet University Press
ISBN: 9781563680267
Format: PDF
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The Deaf Way documents the vast scholarly and artistic endeavors that took place in July 1989 when more than 6,000 deaf people from around the world met at Gallaudet University to celebrate Deaf culture. More than 150 articles by world-renowned experts examine every aspect of Deaf life in societies crisscrossing the globe. This outstanding volume is divided into ten distinct sections: Deaf Culture Around the World, Deaf History, The Study of Sign Language in Society, Diversity in the Deaf Community, Deaf Clubs and Sports, The Deaf Child in the Family, Education, Deaf/Hearing Interaction, Deaf People and the Arts, and Deaf People and Human Rights Issues.

Deaf People and Society

Author: Irene W. Leigh
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 1315473798
Format: PDF
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Deaf People and Society incorporates multiple perspectives related to the topics of psychology, education, and sociology, including the viewpoints of deaf adults themselves. In doing so, it considers the implications of what it means to be deaf or hard of hearing and how deaf adults’ lives are impacted by decisions that professionals make, whether in the clinic, the school, or when working with family. This second edition has been thoroughly revised and offers current perspectives on the following topics: Etiologies of deafness and the identification process The role of auditory access Cognition, language, communication, and literacy Bilingual, bilingual/bimodal, and monolingual approaches to language learning Educational, legal, and placement aspects Childhood psychological issues Psychological and sociological viewpoints of deaf adults The criminal justice system and deaf people Psychodynamics of interaction between deaf and hearing people Each chapter begins with a set of objectives and concludes with suggested readings for further research. This edition contains 10 new and original case studies, including ones on hearing children of deaf adults, sudden hearing loss, a young deaf adult with mental illness, and more. Written by a seasoned deaf/hearing bilingual team, this unique text continues to be the go-to resource for students and future professionals interested in working with deaf and hard-of-hearing persons.

Introduction to American Deaf Culture

Author: Thomas K. Holcomb
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199777543
Format: PDF, Docs
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Introduction to American Deaf Culture provides a fresh perspective on what it means to be Deaf in contemporary hearing society. The book offers an overview of Deaf art, literature, history, and humor, and touches on political, social and cultural themes.