Democracy and Redistribution

Author: Carles Boix
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521532679
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In this 2003 book, Boix offers a complete theory of political transitions.

Democracy and Redistribution

Author: Carles Boix
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521825603
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Employing analytical tools borrowed from game theory, Carles Boix offers a complete theory of political transitions. It is one in which political regimes ultimately depend on the nature of economic assets, their distribution among individuals, and the balance of power among different social groups. Backed by detailed historical research and extensive statistical analysis from the mid-nineteenth century, the study reveals why democracy emerged in classical Athens. It also covers the early triumph of democracy in nineteenth-century agrarian Norway, Switzerland and northeastern America as well as its failure in countries with a powerful landowning class.

Autocracy and Redistribution

Author: Michael Albertus
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107106559
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book shows that land redistribution - the most consequential form of redistribution in the developing world - occurs more often under dictatorship than democracy. It offers a novel theory of land reform and tests it using extensive original data dating back to 1900.

Inequality and Democratization

Author: Ben W. Ansell
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 110700036X
Format: PDF, ePub
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This book offers a new theory of the historical relationship between economic modernization and the emergence of democracy on a global scale, focusing on the effects of land and income inequality.

Political Order and Inequality

Author: Carles Boix
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107089433
Format: PDF
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The fundamental question of political theory, one that precedes all other questions about the nature of political life, is why there is a state at all. This book describes the foundations of stateless societies, why and how states emerge, and the basis of political obligation.

Exclusion by Elections

Author: John D. Huber
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107182948
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Exclusion by Elections develops a theory about the circumstances under which 'class identities' as opposed to 'ethnic identities' become salient in democratic politics, and links this theory to issues of inequality and government efforts to redress the balance. The book argues that in societies with even modest levels of ethnic diversity, inequality invites ethnic politics, and ethnic politics results in less redistribution than class politics. Thus, contrary to workhorse theoretical models of redistribution in social science, where inequality should be related to more redistribution, the argument here is that inequality often makes it more difficult for democracies to adopt policies that redress inequality. Instead, incentives in electoral competition can lead to a situation where inequality becomes reinforced by inequality itself. The author explores the argument empirically by examining cross-national patterns of voting behaviour, redistribution and democratic transitions.

Conservative Parties and the Birth of Democracy

Author: Daniel Ziblatt
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108298591
Format: PDF, Mobi
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How do democracies form and what makes them die? Daniel Ziblatt revisits this timely and classic question in a wide-ranging historical narrative that traces the evolution of modern political democracy in Europe from its modest beginnings in 1830s Britain to Adolf Hitler's 1933 seizure of power in Weimar Germany. Based on rich historical and quantitative evidence, the book offers a major reinterpretation of European history and the question of how stable political democracy is achieved. The barriers to inclusive political rule, Ziblatt finds, were not inevitably overcome by unstoppable tides of socioeconomic change, a simple triumph of a growing middle class, or even by working class collective action. Instead, political democracy's fate surprisingly hinged on how conservative political parties – the historical defenders of power, wealth, and privilege – recast themselves and coped with the rise of their own radical right. With striking modern parallels, the book has vital implications for today's new and old democracies under siege.

Boundary Control

Author: Edward L. Gibson
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139851012
Format: PDF
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The democratization of a national government is only a first step in diffusing democracy throughout a country's territory. Even after a national government is democratized, subnational authoritarian 'enclaves' often continue to deny rights to citizens of local jurisdictions. Gibson offers new theoretical perspectives for the study of democratization in his exploration of this phenomenon. His theory of 'boundary control' captures the conflict pattern between incumbents and oppositions when a national democratic government exists alongside authoritarian provinces (or 'states'). He also reveals how federalism and the territorial organization of countries shape how subnational authoritarian regimes are built and how they unravel. Through a novel comparison of the late nineteenth-century American 'Solid South' with contemporary experiences in Argentina and Mexico, Gibson reveals that the mechanisms of boundary control are reproduced across countries and historical periods. As long as subnational authoritarian governments coexist with national democratic governments, boundary control will be at play.

Democracy Derailed in Russia

Author: M. Steven Fish
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139446851
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Why has democracy failed to take root in Russia? After shedding the shackles of Soviet rule, some countries in the postcommunist region undertook lasting democratization. Yet Russia did not. Russia experienced dramatic political breakthroughs in the late 1980s and early 1990s, but it subsequently failed to maintain progress toward democracy. In this book, M. Steven Fish offers an explanation for the direction of regime change in post-Soviet Russia. Relying on cross-national comparative analysis as well as on in-depth field research in Russia, Fish shows that Russia's failure to democratize has three causes: too much economic reliance on oil, too little economic liberalization, and too weak a national legislature. Fish's explanation challenges others that have attributed Russia's political travails to history, political culture, or to 'shock therapy' in economic policy. The book offers a theoretically original and empirically rigorous explanation for one of the most pressing political problems of our time.