Democracy and Schooling in California

Author: K. Weiler
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137015918
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
This book examines the struggle over public education in mid-twentieth century America through the lens of a joint biography of these two extraordinary women, Heffernan, the California Commissioner of Rural and Elementary Education between 1926 and 1965, and Seeds, the Director of the University Elementary school at UCLA between 1925 and 1957.

Desegregating Chicago s Public Schools

Author: Dionne Danns
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137357584
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
Highlighting the processes and missteps involved in creating and carrying out school desegregation policies in Chicago, Dionne Danns discusses the challenges of using the 1964 Civil Rights Act to implement school desegregation and the resultant limitations and effectiveness of government legislative power in bringing about social change.

Education and the State in Modern Peru

Author: G. Espinoza
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137333030
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
Espinoza's work illuminates how education was the site of ideological and political struggle in Peru during its early years as an independent state. Spanning 100 years and discussing both urban and rural education, it shows how school funding, curricula, and governance became part of the cultural process of state-building in Peru.

Science Education and Citizenship

Author: S. Terzian
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137031875
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
Sevan G. Terzian traces the changing civic justifications for science clubs, fairs, and talent searches for American youth from World War One to the Cold War.

Science Education and Citizenship

Author: Sevan G. Terzian
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN: 1137031867
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
Science fairs, clubs, and talent searches are familiar fixtures in American education, yet little is known about why they began and grew in popularity. In Science Education and Citizenship, Sevan G. Terzian traces the civic purposes of these extracurricular programs for youth over four decades in the early to mid-twentieth century. He argues that Americans' mobilization for World War Two reoriented these educational activities from scientific literacy to national defense — a shift that persisted in the ensuing atomic age and has left a lasting legacy in American science education.

Catholic Teaching Brothers

Author: T. O'Donoghue
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137269057
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
O'Donoghue's book, which is written as a traditional historical narrative, while also utilizing a comparative approach, is concerned with the life of Catholic religious teaching brothers across the English-speaking world, especially for the period 1891 to 1965, which was the heyday of the religious orders.

Women Teaching for Change

Author: Kathleen Weiler
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780897891288
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Offers a feminist theory of education, and looks at the influence of sexism, racism, and classism in school

Country Schoolwomen

Author: Kathleen Weiler
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 9780804730044
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
Focusing on the lives and work of women teachers in two rural California counties from 1850 to 1950, Country Schoolwomen explores the social context of teaching, seeking to understand what teaching meant to women teachers, what it provided them, and how it shaped their categories of experience. The women we meet in this study taught in isolated one- and two-room schoolhouses and in the migrant schools of the Depression years; many of them witnessed the profound upheavals brought about by the two world wars. Through the lens of their lives, the author examines the growth of state control over schools, the irrevocable impact of powerful economic and political changes on small-town life, and the patterns of racism that have divided California from the time of the earliest European settlement. This study challenges a number of assumptions about the lives and work of women teachers. It is often assumed, for example, that the work of women in schools has always been controlled by men--that education has, with rare exceptions, remained a patriarchal space in which women care for children in classrooms while men hold positions of authority, define issues, and set policy. Country Schoolwomen introduces us to a network of women educators who occupied positions of power at the state level, who supported one another, and who defined an alternative, far more positive image of the woman teacher. The work of these women put forth a vision of classroom teaching as a serious and stimulating profession. And for many of the women in this study, teaching clearly did provide material resources and intellectual satisfaction. The historical record thus suggests that rather than signaling their subjugation, teaching has afforded women a potential source of power; it has offered them respect, autonomy, and financial independence. But women have had to struggle--not always successfully--to claim this potential, which male educators have often sought to deny or disregard. In addition, both university experts and local communities have persisted in viewing classroom teaching as "women's work" and have consequently been slow to acknowledge competing perspectives on the profession. This study ultimately reveals, then, not a homogeneous tradition but a dense ideological landscape, one in which representations of "the woman teacher" were often caught among contradictory and contested visions.

Education and the Commercial Mindset

Author: Samuel E. Abrams
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674049179
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
The movement to privatize K–12 education is stronger than ever. Samuel Abrams examines the rise of market forces in public education and reveals how a commercial mindset that sidesteps fundamental challenges has taken over. Nevertheless, public schools should adopt lessons from the business world, such as raising teacher salaries to attract talent.