Deportation

Author: Torrie Hester
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812294025
Format: PDF
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Before 1882, the U.S. federal government had never formally deported anyone, but that year an act of Congress made Chinese workers the first group of immigrants eligible for deportation. Over the next forty years, lawmakers and judges expanded deportable categories to include prostitutes, anarchists, the sick, and various kinds of criminals. The history of that lengthening list shaped the policy options U.S. citizens continue to live with into the present. Deportation covers the uncertain beginnings of American deportation policy and recounts the halting and uncoordinated steps that were taken as it emerged from piecemeal actions in Congress and courtrooms across the country to become an established national policy by the 1920s. Usually viewed from within the nation, deportation policy also plays a part in geopolitics; deportees, after all, have to be sent somewhere. Studying deportations out of the United States as well as the deportation of U.S. citizens back to the United States from abroad, Torrie Hester illustrates that U.S. policy makers were part of a global trend that saw officials from nations around the world either revise older immigrant removal policies or create new ones. A history of immigration policy in the United States and the world, Deportation chronicles the unsystematic emergence of what has become an internationally recognized legal doctrine, the far-reaching impact of which has forever altered what it means to be an immigrant and a citizen.

Expelling the Poor

Author: Hidetaka Hirota
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019061921X
Format: PDF, ePub
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Expelling the Poor examines the origins of immigration restriction in the United States, especially deportation policy. Based on an analysis of immigration policies in major American coastal states, including New York, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Louisiana, and California, itprovides the first sustained study of immigration control conducted by states prior to the introduction of federal immigration law in the late nineteenth century. The influx of impoverished Irish immigrants over the first half of the nineteenth century led nativists in New York and Massachusetts todevelop policies for prohibiting the landing of destitute foreigners and deporting those already resident in the states to Europe, Canada, or other American states. No other coastal state engaged in immigration regulation with the same level of legislative effort and success as the two states. By locating the roots of American immigration control in cultural prejudice against the Irish and, more essentially, economic concerns about their poverty in nineteenth-century New York and Massachusetts, this book fundamentally revises the history of American immigration policy, which has largelyfocused on anti-Asian racism on the West Coast. By investigating state officials' practices of illegal removal, such as the overseas deportation of those who held American citizenship, this book reveals how the state-level treatment of destitute immigrants set precedents for the assertion byAmerican officers of unrestricted power against undesirable aliens, which characterized later federal control. Beginning with Irish migrants' initial departure from Ireland, the book traces their transatlantic passage to North America, the process of their expulsion from the United States, and theirpost-deportation lives in Europe. In doing so, it places American nativism in a transnational context, demonstrating how American deportation policy operated as part of a broader legal culture of excluding non-producing members from societies in the north Atlantic world.

Fremde in unserer Mitte

Author: David Miller
Publisher: Suhrkamp Verlag
ISBN: 3518754262
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Das Thema Einwanderung wirft gewichtige gesellschaftspolitische, moralische und ethische Fragen auf, die seit einiger Zeit im Zentrum intensiver Debatten stehen. Der renommierte britische Philosoph David Miller verteidigt in seinem Buch eine Position zwischen einem starken Kosmopolitismus, der für uneingeschränkte Bewegungsfreiheit und offene Grenzen plädiert, und einem blinden Nationalismus, der oft in pauschale Ausländerfeindlichkeit und dumpfen Rassismus umschlägt. In ständiger Auseinandersetzung mit Gegenargumenten entwickelt er seinen Standpunkt, der die Rechte sowohl der Immigranten als auch der Staatsbürger berücksichtigen soll – und einen schwachen Kosmopolitismus ebenso einschließt wie das Recht von Nationalstaaten, ihre Grenzen zu kontrollieren. Ziel von Millers Ausführungen ist eine Immigrationspolitik liberaler Demokratien, die so gerecht ist wie möglich und so realistisch wie nötig. Ein beeindruckend präzise und nüchtern argumentierendes Buch, das zum Nachdenken anregt und zum Widerspruch reizt.

The Origins of U S Policy in the East China Sea Islands Dispute

Author: Robert D. Eldridge
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317950151
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Ownership of the Senkaku Islands in the East China Sea is disputed between China and Japan, though historically the islands have been part of Okinawa, the southernmost islands of the Japanese archipelago. The dispute, which also involves Taiwan, has the potential to be a flashpoint between the two countries if relations become more strained, especially as the exploitation of gas reserves in the adjoining seabed is becoming an increasingly important issue. A key aspect of the dispute is the attitude of the United States, which, surprisingly, has so far refrained from committing itself to supporting the claims of one side or the other, despite its long-standing, strong alliance with Japan. This book charts the development of the Senkaku Islands dispute, and focuses in particular on the negotiations between the United States and Japan prior to the handing back to Japan in 1972 of Okinawa. The book shows how the detailed progress of these negotiations was critical in defining the United States' neutral attitude to the dispute and the problems this position presents.

Deportation Nation

Author: Dan Kanstroom
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674024724
Format: PDF, ePub
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Deportation Nation is a history of communal self-idealization and self-protection. It aims to answer two fundamental questions: how should we understand deportation and what are the antecedents of our current deportation system?" "Daniel Kanstroom argues that deportation has always been a way not only to manage immigration but also to control noncitizens' lives. It has become a crude and inefficient legal tool in ill-defined "wars" on terror and crime. Deportation Nation illuminates shadowed corners of American history, and demands more attention to hard problems of immigration, law, and human rights in a globalized but often xenophobic world."--Résumé de l'éditeur.

Der lange Weg zum Wasser

Author: Linda Sue Park
Publisher: arsEdition
ISBN: 384581554X
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Nyas Aufgabe ist es, für ihre Familie Wasser bei der Wasserstelle zu holen. Sie läuft dafür acht Stunden. Jeden Tag. Salva flieht aus seinem vom Krieg zerstörten Dorf. Er läuft quer durch Afrika, auf der Suche nach einem sicheren Ort, an dem er bleiben kann, und nach seiner verschollenen Familie. Zwei fesselnde Stimmen erzählen von Not und Vertreibung – aber auch von Hoffnung und Zukunft in einer Welt, in der sich unerwartete Chancen für die auftun, die nicht aufhören, an das Gute zu glauben. Der Roman basiert auf einer wahren Geschichte.