Desert Exile

Author: Yoshiko Uchida
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295806532
Format: PDF
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After the attack on Pearl Harbor, everything changed for Yoshiko Uchida. Desert Exile is her autobiographical account of life before and during World War II. The book does more than relate the day-to-day experience of living in stalls at the Tanforan Racetrack, the assembly center just south of San Francisco, and in the Topaz, Utah, internment camp. It tells the story of the courage and strength displayed by those who were interned. Replaces ISBN 9780295961903

Paper Son

Author: Tung Pok Chin
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 9781566398015
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In this memoir, Tung Pok Chin casts light on the largely hidden experience of those Chinese who emigrated to the USA with false documents during the Exclusion era. Many of the so-called Paper Sons lived out their lives in silent fear of discovery.

After Camp

Author: Greg Robinson
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520271580
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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"The tragedy of incarceration has dominated historical studies of Japanese Americans, and few have explored what happened in the years that followed. A welcome addition to the literature, Greg Robinson's insightful study, "After Camp," will appeal to historians of immigration, the Asian American experience, comparative race relations, and the twentieth-century United States more broadly." --David K. Yoo, author of "Growing Up Nisei" "Greg Robinson has boldly and rightfully identified historians' neglect of Japanese American experiences after World War II. Rather than focusing exclusively on the Pacific Coast, "After Camp" offers a nuanced exploration of the competing strategies and ideas about postwar assimilation among ethnic Japanese on a truly national scale. The depth and range of Robinson's research is impressive, and "After Camp" convincingly moves beyond the tragedy of internment to explain how the drama of resettlement was equally if not more important in shaping the lives of contemporary Japanese Americans."--Allison Varzally, author of "Making a Non-White America."

Amusing the Million

Author: John F. Kasson
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 1429952237
Format: PDF, ePub
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Coney Island: the name still resonates with a sense of racy Brooklyn excitement, the echo of beach-front popular entertainment before World War I. Amusing the Million examines the historical context in which Coney Island made its reputation as an amusement park and shows how America's changing social and economic conditions formed the basis of a new mass culture. Exploring it afresh in this way, John Kasson shows Coney Island no longer as the object of nostalgia but as a harbinger of modernity--and the many photographs, lithographs, engravings, and other reproductions with which he amplifies his text support this lively thesis.

Jewel of the Desert

Author: Sandra C. Taylor
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780520080041
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In the spring of 1942, under the guise of "military necessity," the U.S. government evacuated 110,000 Japanese Americans from their homes on the West Coast. About 7,000 people from the San Francisco Bay Area--the vast majority of whom were American citizens--were moved to an assembly center at Tanforan Racetrack and then to a concentration camp in Topaz, Utah. Dubbed the "jewel of the desert," the camp remained in operation until October 1945. This compelling book tells the history of Japanese Americans of San Francisco and the Bay Area, and of their experiences of relocation and internment. Sandra C. Taylor first examines the lives of the Japanese Americans who settled in and around San Francisco near the end of the nineteenth century. As their numbers grew, so, too, did their sense of community. They were a people bound together not only by common values, history, and institutions, but also by their shared status as outsiders. Taylor looks particularly at how Japanese Americans kept their sense of community and self-worth alive in spite of the upheavals of internment. The author draws on interviews with fifty former Topaz residents, and on the archives of the War Relocation Authority and newspaper reports, to show how relocation and its aftermath shaped the lives of these Japanese Americans. Written at a time when the United States once again regards Japan as a threat, Taylor's study testifies to the ongoing effects of prejudice toward Americans whose face is also the face of "the enemy." In the spring of 1942, under the guise of "military necessity," the U.S. government evacuated 110,000 Japanese Americans from their homes on the West Coast. About 7,000 people from the San Francisco Bay Area--the vast majority of whom were American citizens--were moved to an assembly center at Tanforan Racetrack and then to a concentration camp in Topaz, Utah. Dubbed the "jewel of the desert," the camp remained in operation until October 1945. This compelling book tells the history of Japanese Americans of San Francisco and the Bay Area, and of their experiences of relocation and internment. Sandra C. Taylor first examines the lives of the Japanese Americans who settled in and around San Francisco near the end of the nineteenth century. As their numbers grew, so, too, did their sense of community. They were a people bound together not only by common values, history, and institutions, but also by their shared status as outsiders. Taylor looks particularly at how Japanese Americans kept their sense of community and self-worth alive in spite of the upheavals of internment. The author draws on interviews with fifty former Topaz residents, and on the archives of the War Relocation Authority and newspaper reports, to show how relocation and its aftermath shaped the lives of these Japanese Americans. Written at a time when the United States once again regards Japan as a threat, Taylor's study testifies to the ongoing effects of prejudice toward Americans whose face is also the face of "the enemy."

They Saw the Elephant

Author: JoAnn Levy
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806189959
Format: PDF, Docs
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"The phrase ’seeing the elephant’ symbolized for ’49 gold rushers the exotic, the mythical, the once-in-a-lifetime adventure, unequaled anywhere else but in the journey to the promised land of fortune: California. Most western myths . . . generally depict an exclusively male gold rush. Levy’s book debunks that myth. Here a variety of women travel, work, and write their way across the pages of western migrant history."-Choice "One of the best and most comprehensive accounts of gold rush life to date"ˆ–San Francisco Chronicle

The Buffalo and the Indians

Author: Dorothy Hinshaw Patent
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 9780618485703
Format: PDF, ePub
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Provides a review of the bond between Native Americans and buffalos throughout history and examines how European settlers disrupted nature's balance and nearly caused the extinction of an animal so highly respected by the native tribes.

Nisei Daughter

Author: Monica Itoi Sone
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 9780295956886
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Tells the story of a Japanese-American woman growing up in Seattle in the 1930s who was subjected to relocation during World War II

American History Unbound

Author: Gary Y Okihiro
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520274350
Format: PDF
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American History Unbound is a survey of the United States from its beginnings to the present, as revealed by Asian American and Pacific Islander history as opposed to European history. This is a work of history and anti-history, a narrative that fundamentally transforms our understanding of U.S. history, while remaining an accessible and clear text for students. It is filled with engaging stories and themes that draw attention to key theoretical and historical interpretations. Amongst other reinterpretations it positions Asians and Pacific Islanders within a larger history of people of color in the United States and it narrates U.S. History in the context of World History and oceanic worlds. This is the ideal book for students of U.S. History, American Studies, Ethnic Studies, and Asian American Studies.

When the Emperor Was Divine

Author: Julie Otsuka
Publisher: Anchor
ISBN: 9780307430212
Format: PDF
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The debut novel from the PEN/Faulkner Award Winning Author of The Buddha in the Attic On a sunny day in Berkeley, California, in 1942, a woman sees a sign in a post office window, returns to her home, and matter-of-factly begins to pack her family's possessions. Like thousands of other Japanese Americans they have been reclassified, virtually overnight, as enemy aliens and are about to be uprooted from their home and sent to a dusty internment camp in the Utah desert. In this lean and devastatingly evocative first novel, Julie Otsuka tells their story from five flawlessly realized points of view and conveys the exact emotional texture of their experience: the thin-walled barracks and barbed-wire fences, the omnipresent fear and loneliness, the unheralded feats of heroism. When the Emperor Was Divine is a work of enormous power that makes a shameful episode of our history as immediate as today's headlines.