Developing Inquiry for Learning

Author: Peter Ovens
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1136733531
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Developing Inquiry for Learning shows how university tutors can help students to improve their abilities to learn and to become professional inquirers. An increasing proportion of students entering higher education seem to assume that learning is a relatively passive process. This may be the largest single limitation on their achievement. University tutors need to be able to respond creatively to students’ learning needs and difficulties. The modern teaching environment in higher education demands a sophisticated approach to teaching, learning and assessment i.e. the curriculum: its planning, its development and tutors’ professional development. Tutors need fresh ideas about how to challenge students’ spoon-fed approach, to enable them to become collaborative, yet independently motivated learners. In the innovative and practically proven approach developed by the authors of this book, students are guided to implement action research into their learning practices and reflections. Using a rolling programme of cyclical inquiries and whole group ‘conferences’ on improving learning, students write ‘patches’ on learning development which are then shared across the year group online. Each student’s cumulative set of patches, together with their regular reflective writing, provide the basis for assembling a composite final assignment, a ‘Patchwork Text’, for assessment. This style of curriculum and assessment organisation encourages regular peer feedback and formative assessment, as part of the whole module process. This is a dynamic approach which builds personal confidence within students, both as learners and as professionals. Providing teaching materials and examples of students’ responses, including the use of blogs, wikis and discussion boards, Developing Inquiry for Learning analyses and theorises on the deeper characteristics of the difficulties being addressed. With the provision of relevant frameworks of theory and values, readers are amply equipped to adopt, adapt and experiment within their own developments of teaching and curricula. Tutors, particularly programme leaders, and those who are responsible for the quality of student learning across programmes, are challenged in various ways to re-evaluate current provision and are helped to improve it in ways which can be matched to local situations and priorities. Peter Ovens was Principal Lecturer in Professional and Curriculum Development at Nottingham Trent University and is now a Senior Research Fellow at the University of Cumbria. Frances Wells is a Principal Lecturer in Education at Nottingham Trent University Pat Wallis is a Senior lecturer in Professional Studies at Nottingham Trent University. Cyndy Hawkins is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Nottingham Trent University

Activity Theory Authentic Learning and Emerging Technologies

Author: Vivienne Bozalek
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317676556
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Although emerging technologies are becoming popularised for teaching, learning and research, the relationship between their use and transformative effects on higher education remain largely unexplored. This edited collection seeks to fill this gap by providing a nuanced view, locating higher education pedagogical practices at an intersection of emerging technologies, authentic learning and activity systems. Providing numerous case studies as examples, the book draws from a wide range of contexts to illustrate how such a convergence has the potential to track transformative teaching and learning practices in the higher education sector. Chapters provide the reader with a variety of transformative higher education pedagogical practices in southern contexts, theorised within the framework of Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) and tool mediation, while using authentic learning as a pedagogical model upon which this theoretical framework is based. The topics covered in the book have global relevance, with research paying particular attention to South Africa, Australia and New Zealand, where the authors are based. The book will be of interest to educators, researchers and practitioners in higher education, as well as those interested in emerging technologies in education more generally.

The Value of Academic Discourse

Author: Ph. D Miranda
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1475838549
Format: PDF
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How important is academic discourse that promotes new understandings and allows us to question what we know? In the current age of instant-messaging and Twitter®, does academic conversation have a place? Frankly, we think that academic discourse is more important now than ever. Our civil society functions best when students, instructors, neighbors, and communities come together to question the information before us, so that decisions and directions are viable, helpful, and ethical. Academic conversations help us sort through the important and not-so-important themes of our lives and how we are to live. Academic conversations show us other ways of viewing, and they grow our own repertoire of ideas. Academic conversations teach us wonder, tolerance, humility, and the important fact that the world is bigger than our backyard. Understanding the art and pragmatism of academic conversations requires a building of trust, a willingness to share, and a mind for critical thinking. Guidance for holding conversations with meaning and doing philosophy with learners is modeled, as well as how implementing classroom and collegial discourse benefits our society.

How Students Learn

Author: Committee on How People Learn: A Targeted Report for Teachers
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309089506
Format: PDF, ePub
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How Students Learn: Science in the Classroom builds on the discoveries detailed in the best-selling How People Learn. Now these findings are presented in a way that teachers can use immediately, to revitalize their work in the classroom for even greater effectiveness. Organized for utility, the book explores how the principles of learning can be applied in science at three levels: elementary, middle, and high school. Leading educators explain in detail how they developed successful curricula and teaching approaches, presenting strategies that serve as models for curriculum development and classroom instruction. Their recounting of personal teaching experiences lends strength and warmth to this volume. This book discusses how to build straightforward science experiments into true understanding of scientific principles. It also features illustrated suggestions for classroom activities.

A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Author: Heather Fry
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317650220
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This entirely new edition of a very successful book focuses on developing professional academic skills for supporting and supervising student learning and effective teaching. It is built on the premise that the roles of those who teach in higher education are complex and multi-faceted. A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education is sensitive to the competing demands of teaching, research, scholarship, and academic management. The new edition reflects and responds to the rapidly changing context of higher education and to current understanding of how to best support student learning. Drawing together a large number of expert authors, it continues to feature extensive use of case studies that show how successful teachers have implemented these ideas. It includes key topics such as student engagement and motivation, internationalisation, employability, inclusive strategies for teaching, effective use of technology and issues relating to postgraduate students and student retention. Part 1 explores a number of aspects of the context of UK higher education that affect the education of students, looking at the drivers of institutional behaviours and how to achieve success as a university teacher. Part 2 examines learning, teaching and supervising in higher education and includes chapters on working with diversity, encouraging independent learning and learning gain. Part 3 considers approaches to teaching and learning in different disciplines, covering a full range including arts and humanities, social sciences, experimental sciences through to medicine and dentistry. Written to support the excellence in teaching and learning design required to bring about student learning of the highest quality, this will be essential reading for all new lecturers, particularly anyone taking an accredited course in teaching and learning in higher education, as well as those experienced lecturers who wish to improve their teaching practice. Those working in adult learning and educational development will also find the book to be a particularly useful resource. In addition it will appeal to staff who support learning and teaching in various other roles.

Powerful Learning

Author: Linda Darling-Hammond
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1119181763
Format: PDF, ePub
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In Powerful Learning, Linda Darling-Hammond and animpressive list of co-authors offer a clear, comprehensive, andengaging exploration of the most effective classroom practices.They review, in practical terms, teaching strategies that generatemeaningful K–2 student understanding, and occur both withinthe classroom walls and beyond. The book includes rich stories, aswell as online videos of innovative classrooms and schools, thatshow how students who are taught well are able to think critically,employ flexible problem-solving, and apply learned skills andknowledge to new situations.

Problem Based Learning

Author: John F. Barell
Publisher: Corwin Press
ISBN: 148336013X
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A step-by-step guide for teaching your students to think critically and solve complex problems! Problem-based learning expert John Barell troubleshoots the PBL process for teachers, drawing from practical classroom experience. Step-by-step procedures make this remarkably effective teaching model accessible and highly doable for all teachers, from beginners to veterans. This standards-based, teacher-friendly second edition of the author's popular PBL guide includes: Examples showing problem-based learning in action Answers to frequently asked questions on standards-based implementation Thorough guidelines for developing problems for students to solve Rubrics and assessment tips to ensure that standards are met

How People Learn

Author: National Research Council
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309131979
Format: PDF, Docs
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First released in the Spring of 1999, How People Learn has been expanded to show how the theories and insights from the original book can translate into actions and practice, now making a real connection between classroom activities and learning behavior. This edition includes far-reaching suggestions for research that could increase the impact that classroom teaching has on actual learning. Like the original edition, this book offers exciting new research about the mind and the brain that provides answers to a number of compelling questions. When do infants begin to learn? How do experts learn and how is this different from non-experts? What can teachers and schools do-with curricula, classroom settings, and teaching methods--to help children learn most effectively? New evidence from many branches of science has significantly added to our understanding of what it means to know, from the neural processes that occur during learning to the influence of culture on what people see and absorb. How People Learn examines these findings and their implications for what we teach, how we teach it, and how we assess what our children learn. The book uses exemplary teaching to illustrate how approaches based on what we now know result in in-depth learning. This new knowledge calls into question concepts and practices firmly entrenched in our current education system. Topics include: How learning actually changes the physical structure of the brain. How existing knowledge affects what people notice and how they learn. What the thought processes of experts tell us about how to teach. The amazing learning potential of infants. The relationship of classroom learning and everyday settings of community and workplace. Learning needs and opportunities for teachers. A realistic look at the role of technology in education.

Teaching for Learning and Learning for Teaching

Author: Christopher Klopper
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9463002898
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Teaching for Learning and Learning for Teaching focuses on the emerging global governmental and institutional agenda about higher education teaching quality and the role that peer review can play in supporting improvements in teaching and student outcomes. This agenda is a pervasive element of the further development of higher education internationally through activities of governments, global agencies, institutions of higher education, discrete disciplines, and individual teachers. Many universities have adopted student evaluations as a mechanism to appraise the quality of teaching. These evaluations can be understood as providing a “customer-centric” portrait of quality; and, when used as the sole arbiter of teaching performance they do not instil confidence in the system of evaluation by academic teaching staff. Providing peer perspectives as counterpoint, whether in a developmental or summative form, goes some way to alleviating this imbalance and is the impetus for the resurgence of interest in peer review and observation of teaching. This book seeks to recognise cases of peer review of teaching in Higher Education to affirm best practices and identify areas that require improvement in establishing local, national and international benchmarks of teaching quality.

Teacher Action Research

Author: Gerald J. Pine
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1452278741
Format: PDF
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"This is a wonderful book with deep insight into the relationship between teachers' action and result of student learning. It discusses from different angles impact of action research on student learning in the classroom. Writing samples provided at the back are wonderful examples." —Kejing Liu, Shawnee State University Teacher Action Research: Building Knowledge Democracies focuses on helping schools build knowledge democracies through a process of action research in which teachers, students, and parents collaborate in conducting participatory and caring inquiry in the classroom, school, and community. Author Gerald J. Pine examines historical origins, the rationale for practice-based research, related theoretical and philosophical perspectives, and action research as a paradigm rather than a method. Key Features Discusses how to build a school research culture through collaborative teacher research Delineates the role of the professional development school as a venue for constructing a knowledge democracy Focuses on how teacher action research can empower the active and ongoing inclusion of nontraditional voices (those of students and parents) in the research process Includes chapters addressing the concrete practices of observation, reflection, dialogue, writing, and the conduct of action research, as well as examples of teacher action research studies