East Wind Melts the Ice

Author: Liza Dalby
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520259911
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"To read East Wind Melts the Ice is to slip into a time stream that is both as long and sinuous as history and as ephemeral as the present moment. Drawing inspiration from the thousand year old history of Japanese poetic diaries, and form from the ancient Chinese almanac that she uses to contain her musings, Liza Dalby has accomplished the seemingly impossible task of translating the sensibility of the Heian Court of 11th century Japan into the context of contemporary America. The result is a stunning chronicle of the beauty of time passing and an evocation of the transient and whimsical nature of all things."--Ruth Ozeki, author of My Year of Meats and All Over Creation "I imagine Liza Dalby writing this book in an ancient library, a lion sleeping at her side, as in the paintings of Saint Jerome. As she collects and layers arcane and fascinating pieces of knowledge, she builds her own very personal almanac packed with the wonder of loving two cultures, the intense inner life of each season, and boundless curiosity of the scholar/child. This is a book to dip in and out of throughout the year."--Frances Mayes, author of Under the Tuscan Sun "Liza Dalby's memoir of the seasons is as fresh and captivating as springtime. A very special book."--Michael Pollan, author of The Omnivore's Dilemma "This beautiful book awakens the senses. A journal, an almanac of the seasons, and a series of reflections on ancient Eastern Chinese and Japanese cultures, here you will find subtle observations of rain and heat, tangerines, mulberries and paulownia trees, crickets and doves forming a rich tapestry as they are woven with evocative fragments of history--stories of geishas, of salesmen who sold bulk fireflies, of the wood that was used for kimono chests, of emptiness in the tea ceremony. Like a lush garden, this book is meant to savor."--Susan Griffin, author of The Book of the Courtesans

East Wind Melts the Ice Other Stories

Author: Gail Sher
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780972611596
Format: PDF, Docs
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East Wind Melts the Ice & Other Stories are retellings of narrative fragments from modern Japanese literature and journalism by a contemporary American poet.

Pflaumenbl ten im Schnee

Author: Liza Dalby
Publisher: Rowohlt Verlag GmbH
ISBN: 3688100581
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Aus den nachgelassenen Schriften der Murasaki Shikibu hat Liza Dalby eine faszinierende Romanbiographie entwickelt. Mit großem Einfühlungsvermögen entführt sie den Leser in die Blütezeit einer uralten Kultur und erzählt zugleich von einem Frauenleben, das der heutigen Zeit sehr nahe ist. Als Murasaki Shikibu um die erste Jahrtausendwende in den Palast von Kyoto kommt, ist sie unerfahren und irritiert vom Glanz des höfischen Lebens: von den Intrigen und Machtkämpfen, aber auch von den erotischen Verwirrspielen, mit denen sich der Adel die Zeit vertreibt. Sie wird Hofdame der Kaiserin und Geliebte des mächtigen Kanzlers Michinaga. Ihr romantischer Roman «Die Geliebte vom Prinzen Genji» machte sie weltberühmt.

Geisha

Author: Liza Dalby
Publisher: Rowohlt Verlag GmbH
ISBN: 3688107470
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Gesellschafterinnen oder Edelhuren? Zwischen diesen beiden Extremen bewegen sich westliche Vorstellungen über Geishas. Die amerikanische Ethnologin Liza Dalby wollte es genau wissen. Als erste Ausländerin ließ sie sich in einem Teehaus in Kyoto zur Geisha ausbilden und erlernte diesen traditionsreichen Beruf mit all seiner raffinierten Etikette. Ihr Erlebnisbericht bietet einen einzigartigen Einblick in eine faszinierende fremde Welt.

The Tale of Murasaki

Author: Liza Dalby
Publisher: Nan A. Talese
ISBN: 9781400032785
Format: PDF, Docs
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The Tale of Murasaki is an elegant and brilliantly authentic historical novel by the author of Geisha and the only Westerner ever to have become a geisha. In the eleventh century Murasaki Shikibu wrote the world’s first novel, The Tale of Genji, the most popular work in the history of Japanese literature. In The Tale of Murasaki, Liza Dalby has created a breathtaking fictionalized narrative of the life of this timeless poet–a lonely girl who becomes such a compelling storyteller that she is invited to regale the empress with her tales. The Tale of Murasaki is the story of an enchanting time and an exotic place. Whether writing about mystical rice fields in the rainy mountains or the politics and intrigue of the royal court, Dalby breathes astonishing life into ancient Japan. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Lunisolar Calendar A Sociology of Japanese Time

Author: Jessica Kennett Cork
Publisher: Universal-Publishers
ISBN: 1612337600
Format: PDF
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This study shall explore the social and political significance of the so-called kyureki, the Japanese lunisolar calendar that was abolished by the Meiji government in 1872. This calendar was the principal method of timekeeping in Japan from 604 to 1872, but has received little attention from English speaking scholars. This study argues that the study of the lunisolar calendar is essential to gaining a comprehensive understanding of pre-Meiji society and political history. Chapter 1 uses a detailed analysis of an actual lunisolar calendar coupled with passages from pre-Meiji historical and literary texts to show that the lunisolar calendar reflects the value pre-Meiji society placed on minute seasonal changes, the phases of the moon, and divination controlled by various directional deities. It shall also demonstrate how an understanding of the lunisolar calendar is vital to fully comprehend classical Japanese texts. Chapter 2 explores how calendar reform has been enacted throughout Japanese history to promote the values of new political regimes. Chapter 3 discusses the state of the lunisolar calendar in modern Japan, first analyzing how the calendar survived the Meiji government's attempt to obliterate it and the effect the Meiji calendar reform had on how the lunisolar calendar is understood today. It then discusses how the current revival of interest in the lunisolar calendar reflects the value modern society places on nostalgia for the past, which has arisen as part of the modernization process.

An Elemental Thing

Author: Eliot Weinberger
Publisher: New Directions Publishing
ISBN: 0811223701
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Internationally acclaimed as one of the most innovative writers today, Eliot Weinberger has taken the essay into unexplored territories on the borders of poetry and narrative where the only rule, according to the author, is that all the information must be verifiable. With An Elemental Thing, Weinberger turns from his celebrated political chronicles to the timelessness of the subjects of his literary essays. With the wisdom of a literary archaeologist-astronomer-anthropologist-zookeeper, he leads us through histories, fables, and meditations about the ten thousand things in the universe: the wind and the rhinoceros, Catholic saints and people named Chang, the Mandaeans on the Iran-Iraq border and the Kaluli in the mountains of New Guinea. Among the thirty-five essays included are a poetic biography of the prophet Muhammad, which was praised by the London Times for its "great beauty and grace," and "The Stars," a reverie on what's up there that has already been translated into Arabic, Chinese, Hindi, and Maori.

High Tide and an East Wind

Author: Bruce S. Wright
Publisher: Stackpole Books
ISBN: 0811766756
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Eastern waterfowlers, who know the black duck best, regard this big dusky bird as the top game bird against which all other ducks are measured. In parts of the Northeast this feeling of affection is so strong that in some circles only the black rates the name of "duck." All other species, even the famed canvasback, are "coots," "fish ducks," or are known by even less complimentary titles. Much of this devotion is justified. Without the black duck, wildfowling in much of the thickly settled East would be an unrewarding pastime. Big as a mallard, as wary as a Canada goose, and as handsome in full plumage as any duck that flies, the black duck fills a place on the American sporting scene that could be filled by no other waterfowl. Here is the dramatic story of the life of the black duck, from the time the broods hatch on the spruce-lined ponds of eastern Canada, through the hazardous flights to the southern wintering areas, to the return of the paired birds to the nesting grounds in spring. It is a story told authoritatively by a Canadian scientist whose adult life has been spent in studying the black duck from the fastnesses of its northern breeding grounds in Labrador and Ungava Bay, to the marshes of Louisiana. In this book are facts on the black and other species of waterfowl that will be new to many students of waterfowl as well as to sportsmen. Here also are recommendations for perpetuating the flights of these magnificent game birds.