Ecological Numeracy

Author: R. A. Herendeen
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9780471183099
Format: PDF, ePub
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Master the fundamental math skills necessary to quantify and evaluate a broad range of environmental questions. Environmental issues are often quantitative--how much land, how many people, what amount of pollution. Computer programs are useful, but there is no substitute for being able to use a simple calculation to slice through to the crux of the problem. Having a grasp of how the factors interact and whether the results make sense allows one to explain and argue a point of view forcefully to diverse audiences. With an engaging, down-to-earth style and practical problem-solving approach, Ecological Numeracy makes it easy to understand and master basic mathematical concepts and techniques that are applicable to life-cycle assessment, energy consumption, land use, pollution generation, and a broad range of other environmental issues. Robert Herendeen brings the numbers to life with dozens of fascinating, often entertaining examples and problems. Requiring only a moderate quantitative background, Ecological Numeracy is a superb introduction for advanced undergraduate students in environmental science, planning, geography, and physical and natural sciences. It is also a valuable professional resource for environmental managers, regulators, and administrators.

Economics of Industrial Ecology

Author: Jeroen C. J. M. van den Bergh
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262220712
Format: PDF, Docs
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Studies that integrate scientific, technological, and economic dimensions of industrial ecology and material flows.

Principles of Environmental Sciences

Author: Jan J. Boersema
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1402091583
Format: PDF, Mobi
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International experts provide a comprehensive picture of the principles, concepts and methods that are applicable to problems originating from the interaction between the living/non-living environment and mankind. Both the analysis of such problems and the way solutions to environmental problems may work in specific societal contexts are addressed. Disciplinary approaches are discussed but there is a focus on multi- and interdisciplinary methods. A large number of practical examples and case studies are presented. There is special emphasis on modelling and integrated assessment. This book is different because it stresses the societal, cultural and historical dimensions of environmental problems. The main objective is to improve the ability to analyse and conceptualise environmental problems in context and to make readers aware of the value and scope of different methods. Ideal as a course text for students, this book will also be of interest to researchers and consultants in the environmental sciences.

Environmental Science and International Politics

Author: David E. Henderson
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469640309
Format: PDF, ePub
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Environmental Science and International Politics features two reacting games in one volume, immersing students in the complex process of negotiating international treaties to control environmental pollution. The issues are similar in all the modules; environmental justice, national sovereignty, and the inherent uncertainty of the costs and benefits of pollution control. Students also must understand the basic science of each problem and possible solutions. Acid Rain in Europe, 19779-1989 covers the negotiation of the Long Range Transport Pollution treaty. This was the first ever international pollution control treaty and remains at the forefront of addressing European pollution. This game can be used in a variety of ways and to examine either sulfur dioxide pollution, nitrogen oxide pollution, or both. This game includes summaries of a number of relevant technical articles to support student arguments. Students must deal with the limitations of national resources as they decide how much of their limited money to spend. Climate Change in Copenhagen, 2009 covers the negotiations at the Conference of Parties 15 meeting that was attended by a large number of national leaders. The game also includes representatives of non-government organizations and the press. Students wrestle with the need to work within conflicting limits set by their governments.

Biofuels Solar and Wind as Renewable Energy Systems

Author: D. Pimentel
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1402086547
Format: PDF, ePub
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The petroleum age began about 150 years ago. Easily available energy has s- ported major advances in agriculture, industry, transportation, and indeed many diverse activities valued by humans. Now world petroleum and natural gas s- plies have peaked and their supplies will slowly decline over the next 40–50 years until depleted. Although small amounts of petroleum and natural gas will remain underground, it will be energetically and economically impossible to extract. In the United States, coal supplies could be available for as long as 40–50 years, depending on how rapidly coal is utilized as a replacement for petroleum and natural gas. Having been comfortable with the security provided by fossil energy, especially petroleum and natural gas, we appear to be slow to recognize the energy crisis in the U. S. and world. Serious energy conservation and research on viable renewable - ergy technologies are needed. Several renewable energy technologies already exist, but sound research is needed to improve their effectiveness and economics. Most of the renewable energy technologies are in uenced by geographic location and face problems of intermittent energy supply and storage. Most renewable technologies require extensive land; a few researchers have even suggested that one-half of all land biomass could be harvested in order to supply the U. S. with 30% of its liquid fuel! Some optimistic investigations of renewable energy have failed to recognize that only 0. 1% of the solar energy is captured annually in the U. S.

How to be a Quantitative Ecologist

Author: Jason Matthiopoulos
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781119991724
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Ecological research is becoming increasingly quantitative, yet students often opt out of courses in mathematics and statistics, unwittingly limiting their ability to carry out research in the future. This textbook provides a practical introduction to quantitative ecology for students and practitioners who have realised that they need this opportunity. The text is addressed to readers who haven't used mathematics since school, who were perhaps more confused than enlightened by their undergraduate lectures in statistics and who have never used a computer for much more than word processing and data entry. From this starting point, it slowly but surely instils an understanding of mathematics, statistics and programming, sufficient for initiating research in ecology. The book’s practical value is enhanced by extensive use of biological examples and the computer language R for graphics, programming and data analysis. Key Features: Provides a complete introduction to mathematics statistics and computing for ecologists. Presents a wealth of ecological examples demonstrating the applied relevance of abstract mathematical concepts, showing how a little technique can go a long way in answering interesting ecological questions. Covers elementary topics, including the rules of algebra, logarithms, geometry, calculus, descriptive statistics, probability, hypothesis testing and linear regression. Explores more advanced topics including fractals, non-linear dynamical systems, likelihood and Bayesian estimation, generalised linear, mixed and additive models, and multivariate statistics. R boxes provide step-by-step recipes for implementing the graphical and numerical techniques outlined in each section. How to be a Quantitative Ecologist provides a comprehensive introduction to mathematics, statistics and computing and is the ideal textbook for late undergraduate and postgraduate courses in environmental biology. "With a book like this, there is no excuse for people to be afraid of maths, and to be ignorant of what it can do." —Professor Tim Benton, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, UK