Edgar Degas

Author: Jodi Hauptman
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781633450059
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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A towering figure in 19th-century art, Degas is best known as a painter and chronicler of the ballet. In the 1870s, during an era of enthusiasm for experimental printmaking, Degas was introduced to the monotype process - drawing in black ink on a metal plate that was then run through a press, typically resulting in a single print. Captivated by the medium's potential, Degas made more than 300 monotypes during two discrete bursts of activity, from the mid-1870s to the mid-1880s, and again during the early 1890s. Taking the medium to new and radical heights, the artist abandoned the academic drawing style of his youth, inventing a new repertoire of mark-making that included wiping, scratching, abrading, finger printing and rendering via removal. Frequently, he used monotypes as a starting point from which an image could be reworked, revised, and re-crafted, often with pastel. Degas explored a variety of subject matter in these works, including scenes of modern life; harshly illuminated café singers; ballet dancers onstage, backstage, or in rehearsal; the life of the brothel; intimate moments at the bath; and landscapes. Degas's engagement with monotype had broad consequences for his work in other mediums; repetition and transformation, mirroring and reversal - all essential to Degas's work in monotype - was an ongoing logic of his work in drawing, painting, and pastel. Published to accompany an exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art, this richly illustrated catalogue presents approximately 180 monotypes along with some 50 related works, including paintings, drawings, pastels, sketchbooks and prints. Essays and case studies by curators, scholars and conservators explore the creative potency of Degas's rarely seen monotypes, and highlight their impact on his wider practice.

What Degas Saw

Author: Samantha Friedman
Publisher: Harry N. Abrams
ISBN: 9781633450042
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"With evocative color illustrations by Cristina Pieropan and reproductions of seven works by Degas, 'What Degas saw' encourages young readers and artists to carefully observe their own surroundings."--Inside front flap of dust jacket.

Edgar Degas

Author: Nathalia Brodskaya
Publisher: Parkstone International
ISBN: 1783102861
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Degas was closest to Renoir in the impressionist’s circle, for both favoured the animated Parisian life of their day as a motif in their paintings. Degas did not attend Gleyre’s studio; most likely he first met the future impressionists at the Café Guerbois. He started his apprenticeship in 1853 at the studio of Louis-Ernest Barrias and, beginning in 1854, studied under Louis Lamothe, who revered Ingres above all others, and transmitted his adoration for this master to Edgar Degas. Starting in 1854 Degas travelled frequently to Italy: first to Naples, where he made the acquaintance of his numerous cousins, and then to Rome and Florence, where he copied tirelessly from the Old Masters. His drawings and sketches already revealed very clear preferences: Raphael, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Mantegna, but also Benozzo Gozzoli, Ghirlandaio, Titian, Fra Angelico, Uccello, and Botticelli. During the 1860s and 1870s he became a painter of racecourses, horses and jockeys. His fabulous painter’s memory retained the particularities of movement of horses wherever he saw them. After his first rather complex compositions depicting racecourses, Degas learned the art of translating the nobility and elegance of horses, their nervous movements, and the formal beauty of their musculature. Around the middle of the 1860s Degas made yet another discovery. In 1866 he painted his first composition with ballet as a subject, Mademoiselle Fiocre dans le ballet de la Source (Mademoiselle Fiocre in the Ballet ‘The Spring’) (New York, Brooklyn Museum). Degas had always been a devotee of the theatre, but from now on it would become more and more the focus of his art. Degas’ first painting devoted solely to the ballet was Le Foyer de la danse à l’Opéra de la rue Le Peletier (The Dancing Anteroom at the Opera on Rue Le Peletier) (Paris, Musée d’Orsay). In a carefully constructed composition, with groups of figures balancing one another to the left and the right, each ballet dancer is involved in her own activity, each one is moving in a separate manner from the others. Extended observation and an immense number of sketches were essential to executing such a task. This is why Degas moved from the theatre on to the rehearsal halls, where the dancers practised and took their lessons. This was how Degas arrived at the second sphere of that immediate, everyday life that was to interest him. The ballet would remain his passion until the end of his days.

Degas Drawings of Dancers

Author: Edgar Degas
Publisher: Courier Corporation
ISBN: 0486141667
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Forty-one full-page, six half-page drawings depict dancers on stage, in the classroom, and at rehearsals. Charming, spirited views of dancers pirouetting, executing grand battements and ports de bras, practicing at the barre, and more.

Degas and the Nude

Author: George T. M. Shackelford
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780500093627
Format: PDF, Docs
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The nude figure was critical to the art of Edgar Degas throughout his life, and yet his expansive body of work on this subject has been overshadowed by his celebrated portraits and dancers. Degas and the Nude is the first book in a generation to explore the artists treatment of the nude from his early years in the 1850s and 1860s, through his triumphs in the 1880s and 1890s, all the way to his last decades, when the theme dominated his artistic production in all media. With essays by leading critics, the book aims to provide a new interpretation of Degass evolving conception of the nude and to situate it in the subjects broader context among his peers in 19th-century France. Among the scores of reproductions is one of the most important of Degass early paintings, Scene of War in the Middle Ages, which exerted a lifelong influence on the artists treatment of the female nude and includes poses poses repeated throughout his career. Also included are monotypes of the late 1870s, which illustrate Degass most explicitly sexual depictions of women in Parisian brothels, and pictures portraying the daily life of women wherever they resided. Together these iterations range over more than a half-century of virtuoso achievement and manifest a groundbreaking look at the evolution of this master artist.

Degas

Author: Roy McMullen
Publisher: Harvill Secker
ISBN:
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Degas

Author: Jane Munro
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780300228236
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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A beautiful celebration of six decades of work by Edgar Degas, published in the centennial year of the artist's death Edgar Degas's (1834-1917) relentless experimentation with technical procedures is a hallmark of his lifelong desire to learn. The numerous iterations of compositions and poses suggest an intense self-discipline, as well as a refusal to accept any creative solution as definitive or finite. Published in the centenary year of the artist's death, this book presents an exceptional array of Degas's work, including paintings, drawings, pastels, etchings, monotypes, counter proofs, and sculpture, with approximately sixty key works from private and public collections in Europe and the United States, some of them published here for the first time. Shown together, the impressive works represent well over half a century of innovation and artistic production. Essays by leading Degas scholars and conservation scientists explore his practice and recurring themes of the human figure and landscape. The book opens with a study of Degas's debt to the Old Masters, and it concludes with a consideration of his artistic legacy and his influence on leading artists of the 20th and 21st centuries, including Francis Bacon, Frank Auerbach, Ryan Gander, David Hockney, Howard Hodgkin, R. B. Kitaj, Pablo Picasso, and Walter Sickert.

Degas Method

Author: Line Clausen Pedersen
Publisher: Black Dog Pub Limited
ISBN: 9781910433140
Format: PDF, ePub
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“No art is less spontaneous than mine…. What I do is the result of reflection and study of the great masters; of inspiration, spontaneity, temperament …I know nothing.”— Edgar Degas (1834–1917). With characteristic dry humour, Degas presented his artistic endeavours as the result of other people’s hard work and artistic originality, setting himself apart from his fellow Impressionists—he largely rejected the term despite being widely considered an integral founder of the movement—by choosing to direct his attention towards pensive, isolated study of the old masters. By claiming to know “nothing”, the artist was making a conspicuously paradoxical statement; by learning through imitation—be it drawing styles, statements, ideologies, and both academic and artistic radicalities—he was not wholly in error when according others credit for his work, but it is far from the whole story. Through his practice and involvement in the Impressionist movement, Degas altered both the political and aesthetic premises for painting. His way of proceeding was idiosyncratic and thoroughly original, not only in the individual works, but in general terms when he consciously reused experiences ranging across his production. Art is no simple matter, but a statement that is developed over and across time. Degas placed himself as the latest in a line of great masters, consciously working and thinking in ways which made him the heir to—and successor to the throne of—the truly great art which endures beyond its own era. He worked stubbornly towards an art, the visual freedom and apparently unregulated appearance of which seem unsurpassed even to this day. He was a master of both tradition and progress—and this is why his oeuvre occupies an enormously important position in the narrative of the painting of our own time. Rather than a desire to bring to light a “complete” account of the artist’s oeuvre, Degas’ Method is an extensive retrospective that stages and presents the synergy that exists between the works. Lavishly illustrated, the publication spans painting, pastel, monotype, sculpture, drawing and several graphic disciplines to bring together the artist’s vast catalogue of work, ranging across motif, technique and chronology—not least the rare collection of bronze-cast figures, originally found in wax and clay in the artist’s atelier after his death. These disciplines and themes are explored in the books in-depth essays and reprints, by writers and scholars as diverse as Line Clausen Pederson (“Degas’ Method”); Peter Parshall (“Degas and the Closeted Image”); Daphne Barbour and Shelley Sturman (“Degas’ Process Captured in Bronze”); Elizabeth Steele (“Dancers Practising in the Foyer and Dancers at the Barre”); Flemming Friborg (“Sapphires in Velvet Jewelery Boxes”); Édouard Kopp (“Degas’ Draughtsmanship”); Josephine Nielsen-Bergqvist (“Degas in the ‘laboratory’”); and Walter Sickert (“The Sculptor of Movement”—the artist’s preface to the catalogue for the 1923 Exhibition of the Works in Sculpture of Edgar Degas). A collaborative publication between Black Dog Publishing and NY Carlsberg Glyptotek—whose 2013 exhibition of the same name the book is a companion piece to—Degas’ Method is an essential new insight in to the work of a titan of both Impression and realist art.