Education Policy Space and the City

Author: Kalervo N. Gulson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136886273
Format: PDF, ePub
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Drawing on three case studies of K-12 public schooling in London, Sydney and Vancouver, this book examines the geographies of neoliberal education policy in the inner city. Gulson uses an innovative and critical spatial approach to explore how the processes and practices of neoliberal education policy, specifically those relating to education markets and school choice, enable the pervasiveness of a white, middle-class, re-imagining of inner-city areas, and render race "(in)visible." With urbanization posited as one of the central concerns for the future of the planet, relationships between the city, educational policy, and social and educational inequality deserve sustained examination. Gulson’s book is a rich and needed contribution to these areas of study.

Spatial Theories of Education

Author: Kalervo N. Gulson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134139624
Format: PDF, ePub
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This collection of original work, within the sociology of education, draws on the 'spatial turn' in contemporary social theory. The premise of this book is that drawing on theories of space allows for a more sophisticated understanding of the competing rationalities underlying educational policy change, social inequality and cultural practices. The contributors work a spatial dimension into the consideration of educational phenomena and illustrate its explanatory potential in a range of domains: urban renewal, globalisation, race, markets and school choice, suburbanisation, regional and rural settings, and youth and student culture.

Inequality Power and School Success

Author: Gilberto Conchas
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317562070
Format: PDF, Docs
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This volume highlights issues of power, inequality, and resistance for Asian, African American, and Latino/a students in distinct U.S. and international contexts. Through a collection of case studies it links universal issues relating to inequality in education, such as Asian, Latino, and African American males in the inner-city neighborhoods, Latina teachers and single mothers in California, undocumented youth from Mexico and El Salvador, immigrant Morrocan youth in Spain, and immigrant Afro-Caribbean and Indian teenagers in New York and in London. The volume explores the processes that keep students thriving academically and socially, and outlines the patterns that exist among individuals—students, teachers, parents—to resist the hegemony of the dominant class and school failure. With emphasis on racial formation theory, this volume fundamentally argues that education, despite inequality, remains the best hope of achieving the American dream.

The New Political Economy of Urban Education

Author: Pauline Lipman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136759999
Format: PDF, ePub
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Urban education and its contexts have changed in powerful ways. Old paradigms are being eclipsed by global forces of privatization and markets and new articulations of race, class, and urban space. These factors and more set the stage for Pauline Lipman's insightful analysis of the relationship between education policy and the neoliberal economic, political, and ideological processes that are reshaping cities in the United States and around the globe. Using Chicago as a case study of the interconnectedness of neoliberal urban policies on housing, economic development, race, and education, Lipman explores larger implications for equity, justice, and "the right to the city". She draws on scholarship in critical geography, urban sociology and anthropology, education policy, and critical analyses of race. Her synthesis of these lenses gives added weight to her critical appraisal and hope for the future, offering a significant contribution to current arguments about urban schooling and how we think about relations between neoliberal education reforms and the transformation of cities. By examining the cultural politics of why and how these relationships resonate with people's lived experience, Lipman pushes the analysis one step further toward a new educational and social paradigm rooted in radical political and economic democracy.

The Oxford Handbook of Criminology

Author: Alison Liebling
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198719442
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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With contributions from over 60 leading experts in the field, The Oxford Handbook of Criminology is the definitive guide to the discipline providing an authoritative and outstanding collection of chapters on the key topics studied on criminology courses. The Handbook has shaped the study of criminology for over two decades and, with this new edition, continues to be indispensable to students, academics, and professionals alike. Each chapter details relevant theory, recent research, policy developments, and current debates. Extensive references aid further research. Extensively revised, the sixth edition has been expanded to include all the major topics and significant new issues such as zemiology; green criminology; domestic violence; prostitution and sex work; penal populism; and the significance of globalization for criminology. The Oxford Handbook of Criminology is accompanied by a suite of online resources providing additional teaching and learning materials for both students and lecturers. This includes selected chapters from previous editions, essay questions for each chapter, web links to aid further research, and guidance on how to answer essay questions.

Making Sense of School Choice

Author: Joel A. Windle
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN: 1137483547
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Why is choosing a school an urgent and self-defining task for some, and virtually meaningless for others? How is it possible that most parents contemplate only a single educational option in even the world's most marketized education system? Making Sense of School Choice provides an original analysis of the global rise of neoliberal education reform, focussing on the curriculum as the site for tensions both in the mass expansion of secondary education, and in attempts to contain these through a return to socially restrictive schooling. The investigation provides fresh insights into the ways families from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds understand and engage with school choice, as well as efforts by schools to manage their market position. Windle casts new light on the transnational networks through which political and corporate players, the media, and elite educational institutions dictate terms to socially exposed sites - those schools catering to minority and disadvantaged student populations.

World Yearbook of Education 2016

Author: Antoni Verger
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317518713
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This latest volume in the World Yearbook of Education series examines the global education industry both in OECD* countries as well as developing countries, and presents the works of scholars based in different parts of the word who have significantly contributed to this area of research. Focusing on the areas of cross-over in public-private partnerships in education, WYBE 2016 critically examines the actors and factors that have propelled the global rise of the education industry. Split into three key sections, Part I explores how education agendas are shaped; Part II considers the private financing of education and the export of school improvements to professional consultancies; and Part III analyses new market niches, such as low-fee private schooling and for-profit education provisions. The book draws upon case studies of many global organizations, including: The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Pearson Affordable Learning Fund Bridge International Academies Teach for All Omega Schools Co-edited by three internationally renowned scholars, Antoni Verger, Christopher Lubienski and Gita Steiner-Khamsi, WYBE 2016 will be a valuable resource for researchers, graduates and policy makers who are interested in the global education industry. *Convention on the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Routledge Handbook of Asian Borderlands

Author: Alexander Horstmann
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317422740
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In Asia, where authoritarian-developmental states have proliferated, statehood and social control are heavily contested in borderland spaces. As a result, in the post-Cold War world, borders have not only redefined Asian incomes and mobilities, they have also rekindled neighbouring relations and raised questions about citizenship and security. The contributors to the Routledge Handbook of Asian Borderlands highlight some of these processes taking place at the fringe of the state. Offering an array of comparative perspectives of Asian borders and borderlands in the global context, this handbook is divided into thematic sections, including: Livelihoods, commodities and mobilities Physical land use and agrarian transformations Borders and boundaries of the state and the notion of statelessness Re-conceptualizing trade and the economy in the borderlands The existence and influence of humanitarians, religions, and NGOs The militarization of borderlands Causing us to rethink and fundamentally question some of the categories of state, nation, and the economy, this is an important resource for students and scholars of Asian Studies, Border Studies, Social and Cultural Studies, and Anthropology.

The Struggle for Control of Public Education

Author: Michael Engel
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 9781566397414
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Those making decisions about education today argue that market strategies promote democratic educational reform, when really they promote market reform of education. Michael Engel argues against this tendency, siding with democratic values and calls for a return to community-controlled schools.