Environmental Inequalities

Author: Andrew Hurley
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807898789
Format: PDF, ePub
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By examining environmental change through the lens of conflicting social agendas, Andrew Hurley uncovers the historical roots of environmental inequality in contemporary urban America. Hurley's study focuses on the steel mill community of Gary, Indiana, a city that was sacrificed, like a thousand other American places, to industrial priorities in the decades following World War II. Although this period witnessed the emergence of a powerful environmental crusade and a resilient quest for equality and social justice among blue-collar workers and African Americans, such efforts often conflicted with the needs of industry. To secure their own interests, manufacturers and affluent white suburbanites exploited divisions of race and class, and the poor frequently found themselves trapped in deteriorating neighborhoods and exposed to dangerous levels of industrial pollution. In telling the story of Gary, Hurley reveals liberal capitalism's difficulties in reconciling concerns about social justice and quality of life with the imperatives of economic growth. He also shows that the power to mold the urban landscape was intertwined with the ability to govern social relations.

Environmental Inequalities

Author: Andrew Hurley
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807845183
Format: PDF
Download Now
By examining environmental change through the lens of conflicting social agendas, Andrew Hurley uncovers the historical roots of environmental inequality in contemporary urban America. Hurley's study focuses on the steel mill community of Gary, Indiana, a

Common Fields

Author: Andrew Hurley
Publisher: Missouri History Museum
ISBN: 9781883982157
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In Common Fields, environmental historian Andrew Hurley has gathered thirteen original essays to tell a compelling story of one city's history. It is a story built on the never-ending tension between urban growth and environmental sustainability - a tension that defines the fate not just of St. Louis, but of cities around the world. In these pages, geographers, archaeologists, and historians come together to consider the enduring ties between a city's diverse residents and the physical environment on which their well-being depends.

Transforming Environmentalism

Author: Eileen McGurty
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813546788
Format: PDF, Docs
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Transforming Environmentalism explores a moment central to the emergence of the environmental justice movement. In 1978, residents of predominantly African American Warren County, North Carolina, were that the state planned to build a land fill to hold forty thousand cubic yards of soil contaminated with PCBs from illegal dumping. They responded with a four-year resistance, ending in a month of protests with over 500 arrests from civil disobedience and disruptive actions. Eileen McGurty traces the evolving approaches residents took to contest environmental racism in their community and shows how activism in Warren County spurred greater political debate and became a model for communities across the nation.

Beyond Preservation

Author: Andrew Hurley
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 1439902305
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A framework for stabilizing and strengthening inner-city neighborhoods through the public interpretation of historic landscapes.

Crimes Against Nature

Author: Karl Jacoby
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520239098
Format: PDF, Docs
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"This insightful and lucid book combines social with environmental history, enriching both. . . . Timely, eloquent, and provocative, Crimes against Nature illuminates contemporary struggles, especially in the West, over our environment."--Alan Taylor, author of William Cooper's Town "A compelling new interpretation of early conservation history in the United States. . . . Powerfully argued and beautifully written, this book could hardly be more relevant to the environmental challenges we face today."--William Cronon, author of Nature's Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West "What a powerful and yet subtle tale of the fraught encounter between the conservationists' desire to 'engineer' wilderness with the property regime of the modern state and the unique, local, 'moral ecologies' of those who resisted! Rarely has this level of originality, close reasoning, and historical texture been brought into such harmony while preserving the whiff of lived experience."--James C. Scott, author of Seeing Like a State

The Deindustrialized World

Author: Steven High
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 077483496X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Since the 1970s, the closure of mines, mills, and factories has marked a rupture in working-class lives. The Deindustrialized World interrogates the process of industrial ruination, from the first impact of layoffs in metropolitan cities, suburban areas, and single-industry towns to the shock waves that rippled outward, affecting entire regions, countries, and beyond. Scholars from five nations share personal stories of ruin and ruination and ask others what it means to be working class in a postindustrial world. Together, they open a window on the lived experiences of people living at ground zero of deindustrialization, revealing its layered impacts and examining how workers, environmentalists, activists, and the state have responded to its challenges.

Capitalizing on Environmental Injustice

Author: Daniel Faber
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
ISBN: 0742563448
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Capitalizing on Environmental Injustice provides a comprehensive overview of the achievements and challenges confronting the environmental justice movement. Pressured by increased international competition and the demand for higher profits, industrial and political leaders are working to weaken many of America's most essential environmental, occupational, and consumer protection laws. In addition, corporate-led globalization exports many ecological hazards abroad. The result is a deepening of the ecological crisis in both the United States and the Global South. However, not all people are impacted equally. In this process of capital restructuring, it is the most marginalized segments of society -poor people of color and the working class-that suffer the greatest force of corporate environmental abuses. Daniel Faber, a leading environmental sociologist, analyzes the global political and economic forces that create these environmental injustices. With a multi-disciplinary approach, Faber presents both broad overviews and powerful insider case studies, examining the connections between many different struggles for change. Capitalizing on Environmental Injustice explores compelling movements to challenge the polluter-industrial complex and bring about meaningful social transformation.