Equal Time

Author: Aniko Bodroghkozy
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252093784
Format: PDF, ePub
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Equal Time: Television and the Civil Rights Movement explores the crucial role of network television in reconfiguring new attitudes in race relations during the civil rights movement. Due to widespread coverage, the civil rights revolution quickly became the United States' first televised major domestic news story. This important medium unmistakably influenced the ongoing movement for African American empowerment, desegregation, and equality. Aniko Bodroghkozy brings to the foreground network news treatment of now-famous civil rights events including the 1965 Selma voting rights campaign, integration riots at the University of Mississippi, and the March on Washington, including Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech. She also examines the most high-profile and controversial television series of the era to feature African American actors--East Side/West Side, Julia, and Good Times--to reveal how entertainment programmers sought to represent a rapidly shifting consensus on what "blackness" and "whiteness" meant and how they now fit together.

Framing the South

Author: Allison Graham
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 9780801874451
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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"In a series of interlocking essays, Graham deftly explores the ways Hollywood filmmakers and television producers tried to reformulate stock southern characters in light of rapidly changing social relations... A fascinating and compelling cultural history that should be of use to a wide array of scholars." -- American Studies

Africana Race and Communication

Author: James L. Conyers Jr.
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 149853855X
Format: PDF
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Africana Race and Communication: A Social Study of Film, Communication, and Social Media focuses on the areas of History, Ethos, Motif, and Mythology-Philosophy. This study is an interdisciplinary study, which surveys the collection, interpretation, and analysis of Black communication and culture. Likewise, the intellectual dexterity of Africana Studies as an interdisciplinary body of knowledge postures alternative ways of probing Africana phenomena. This volume provides a categorical lens matrix of Africana Studies to locate race and communication in place, space, and time. Thus, it provides readers with a compilation of literary, historical, philosophical, and communicative essays that attempt to describe and evaluate the Africana experience from a centered perspective.

Newspaper Wars

Author: Sid Bedingfield
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252099834
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Against all odds, the seeds of social change found purchase in mid-twentieth century South Carolina. Newspaperman John McCray and his allies at the Lighthouse and Informer challenged readers to "rebel and fight"--to reject the "slavery of thought and action" and become "progressive fighters" for equality. Newspaper Wars traces the role journalism played in the fight for civil rights in South Carolina from the 1930s through the 1960s. Moving the press to the center of the political action, Sid Bedingfield tells the stories of the long-overlooked men and women on the front lines of a revolution. African American progress sparked a battle to shape South Carolina's civic life, with civil rights activists arrayed against white journalists determined to preserve segregation through massive resistance. As that strategy failed, white newspapers turned to overt political action and crafted the still-prevalent narratives that aligned southern whites with the national conservative movement. A fascinating portrait of a defining time, Newspaper Wars analyzes the role journalism played--and still can play--during times of social, cultural, and political change.

Rediscovering U S Newsfilm

Author: Mark Garrett Cooper
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315516713
Format: PDF
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The twentieth century generated tens of thousands of hours of American newsfilm but not the scholarly apparatus necessary to analyze and contextualize them. Assembling new approaches to the study of U.S. newsfilm in cinema and television, this book makes a long overdue critical intervention in the field of film and media studies by addressing the format’s inherent intermediality; its mediation of "events" for local, national, and transnational communities; its distinctive archival legacies; and, consequently, its integral place in film and television studies more broadly. This collection brings fresh, contemporary methodologies and analysis to bear on a vast amount of material that has languished in relative obscurity for far too long.

Living with Lynching

Author: Koritha Mitchell
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252093526
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Living with Lynching: African American Lynching Plays, Performance, and Citizenship, 1890–1930 demonstrates that popular lynching plays were mechanisms through which African American communities survived actual and photographic mob violence. Often available in periodicals, lynching plays were read aloud or acted out by black church members, schoolchildren, and families. Koritha Mitchell shows that African Americans performed and read the scripts in community settings to certify to each other that lynch victims were not the isolated brutes that dominant discourses made them out to be. Instead, the play scripts often described victims as honorable heads of household being torn from model domestic units by white violence. In closely analyzing the political and spiritual uses of black theatre during the Progressive Era, Mitchell demonstrates that audiences were shown affective ties in black families, a subject often erased in mainstream images of African Americans. Examining lynching plays as archival texts that embody and reflect broad networks of sociocultural activism and exchange in the lives of black Americans, Mitchell finds that audiences were rehearsing and improvising new ways of enduring in the face of widespread racial terrorism. Images of the black soldier, lawyer, mother, and wife helped readers assure each other that they were upstanding individuals who deserved the right to participate in national culture and politics. These powerful community coping efforts helped African Americans band together and withstand the nation's rejection of them as viable citizens.

The Long Reconstruction

Author: Frank J. Wetta
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136331867
Format: PDF, Kindle
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A century and a half after the Civil War, Americans are still dealing with the legacies of the conflict and Reconstruction, including the many myths and legends spawned by these events. The Long Reconstruction: The Post-Civil War South in History, Film, and Memory brings together history and popular culture to explore how the events of this era have been remembered. Looking at popular cinema across the last hundred years, The Long Reconstruction uncovers central themes in the history of Reconstruction, including violence and terrorism; the experiences of African Americans and those of women and children; the Lost Cause ideology; and the economic reconstruction of the American South. Analyzing influential films such as The Birth of a Nation and Gone with the Wind, as well as more recent efforts such as Cold Mountain and Lincoln, the authors show how the myths surrounding Reconstruction have impacted American culture. This engaging book is essential reading for anyone interested in the history of Reconstruction, historical memory, and popular culture.

The Race Beat

Author: Gene Roberts
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307455947
Format: PDF, ePub
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An unprecedented examination of how news stories, editorials and photographs in the American press—and the journalists responsible for them—profoundly changed the nation’s thinking about civil rights in the South during the 1950s and ‘60s. Roberts and Klibanoff draw on private correspondence, notes from secret meetings, unpublished articles, and interviews to show how a dedicated cadre of newsmen—black and white—revealed to a nation its most shameful shortcomings that compelled its citizens to act. Meticulously researched and vividly rendered, The Race Beat is an extraordinary account of one of the most calamitous periods in our nation’s history, as told by those who covered it. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Child of the Civil Rights Movement

Author: Paula Young Shelton
Publisher: Dragonfly Books
ISBN: 0385376065
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The author, the daughter of Andrew Young, describes the participation of Martin Luther King, Jr., along with her father and others, in the civil rights movement and in the historic march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, in 1965.

Violence in American Popular Culture 2 volumes

Author: David Schmid
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440832064
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This timely collection provides a historical overview of violence in American popular culture from the Puritan era to the present and across a range of media. • Provides a narrative of the development of violence in American popular culture, illustrating both continuity and change • Combines an overview of each essay's subject matter with in-depth analysis of specific examples • Features discussion of well-known portrayers of violence, such as film and television, as well as lesser-known sources—for example, murder ballads and Puritan sermons—helping readers place contemporary concerns and examples into a detailed historical context • Suggests directions for future research and other developments in the field • Includes a keyword index to enable readers to track continuities across the various essays