Eruption The Untold Story of Mount St Helens

Author: Steve Olson
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393242803
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Survival narrative meets scientific, natural, and social history in the riveting story of a volcanic disaster. For months in early 1980, scientists, journalists, sightseers, and nearby residents listened anxiously to rumblings in Mount St. Helens, part of the chain of western volcanoes fueled by the 700-mile-long Cascadia fault. Still, no one was prepared when an immense eruption took the top off of the mountain and laid waste to hundreds of square miles of verdant forests in southwestern Washington State. The eruption was one of the largest in human history, deposited ash in eleven U.S. states and five Canadian provinces, and caused more than one billion dollars in damage. It killed fifty-seven people, some as far as thirteen miles away from the volcano’s summit. Shedding new light on the cataclysm, author Steve Olson interweaves the history and science behind this event with page-turning accounts of what happened to those who lived and those who died. Powerful economic and historical forces influenced the fates of those around the volcano that sunny Sunday morning, including the construction of the nation’s railroads, the harvest of a continent’s vast forests, and the protection of America’s treasured public lands. The eruption of Mount St. Helens revealed how the past is constantly present in the lives of us all. At the same time, it transformed volcanic science, the study of environmental resilience, and, ultimately, our perceptions of what it will take to survive on an increasingly dangerous planet. Rich with vivid personal stories of lumber tycoons, loggers, volcanologists, and conservationists, Eruption delivers a spellbinding narrative built from the testimonies of those closest to the disaster, and an epic tale of our fraught relationship with the natural world.

Eruption

Author: Steve Olson
Publisher: W. W. Norton
ISBN: 9780393353587
Format: PDF, Kindle
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For months in early 1980, scientists, journalists, and nearby residents listened anxiously to rumblings from Mount St. Helens in southwestern Washington State. Still, no one was prepared when a cataclysmic eruption blew the top off of the mountain, laying waste to hundreds of square miles of land and killing fifty-seven people. Steve Olson interweaves vivid personal stories with the history, science, and economic forces that influenced the fates and futures of those around the volcano. Eruption delivers a spellbinding narrative of an event that changed the course of volcanic science, and an epic tale of our fraught relationship with the natural world.

Mount St Helens

Author: Rob Carson
Publisher: Sasquatch Books
ISBN: 157061248X
Format: PDF
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Documents the events leading up to and following the eruption of Mount St. Helens in May 1980 as well as the twenty-year process of the mountain's ecological rebirth.

Footprints in the Ash

Author: John D. Morris
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780890514009
Format: PDF
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In the aftermath, amid the rivers of mud, blankets of ash, and eerie quiet, scientists made a startling discovery: nature was bringing life out of death, reclaiming from the destruction a teeming colony of plant and animal life. Most amazing of all, the geological upheavals had re-created the processes of old that had carved out such marvels as the Grand Canyon. Today, the site stands as a testament to the power of God, who upholds all of creation. In His infinite wisdom, He has shown the modern science of geology that the earth is much, much younger than many suspected.

Echoes of Fury

Author: Frank Parchman
Publisher: Epicenter Press
ISBN: 9780974501437
Format: PDF
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Finally comes the first complete account of the cataclysmic eruption of Mount St. Helens and its dramatic after-effects on the mountain and life around it for a quarter-century. Frank Parchman tells an epic story of eight people whose lives careen into dramatic new directions and who ultimately become bonded to one another and to the mountain in the aftermath of the volcanic fury in the southwest Washington state. Echoes of Fury is about nature's awesome dispay of raw-throated power; the heartbreak and anger of survivors whose lost loved ones were largely unaware of the danger, the thrill of scientific discovery, and ultimately the renewal of both nature and the human spirit.

Truman of St Helens The Man and His Mountain

Author: Shirley Rosen
Publisher: Discover Your Northwest
ISBN: 9780914019725
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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At 8:32am, Sunday, May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens erupted in Washington State with the explosive force of more than 20 million tons of TNT. It remains the most deadly and economically destructive volcanic eruption in the history of the United States. When author Shirley Rosen first heard the news, her immediate thoughts were of her 83-year-old uncle, Harry Truman, who owned the 50-acre Mt. St. Helens Lodge resort on the shores of Spirit Lake. Harry was his given name, but if anyone asked he'd say, "Just call me Truman." Drawing from interviews and memories of working at Truman's lodge, Shirley Rosen tells the story of this salty curmudgeon who became an American folk hero during the eruption of Mount St. Helens. When the mountain gave warnings of impending danger, Truman defiantly refused to leave his home of 55 years. His rugged independence, hard-nosed business sense, and infectious humor embodied the spirit of the nation, capturing its attention and its heart. In the end, the mountain he loved had the final word. Truman's story remains a Northwest original and is forever embedded within the dynamic slopes of Mount St. Helens.

Count Down

Author: Steve Olson
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 9780618562121
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Follows six American high school students on the quest for glory in the Olympics of math competitions--The International Mathematical Olympiad.

Portrait of Mount St Helens

Author: Chuck Williams
Publisher: Graphic Arts Books
ISBN: 9781558683105
Format: PDF
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View the grandeur and the intimate detail of this beloved mountain as seen by 19th-century painters and pioneers as well as contemporary photographers.

The Eruption of Mount St Helens

Author: Charles River Editors
Publisher: CreateSpace
ISBN: 9781500617585
Format: PDF
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*Includes pictures *Includes eyewitness accounts of the eruption *Includes a bibliography for further reading “One big 'Aha!' for geologists was that an entire mountain could collapse.” – Peter Frenzen “Mount St. Helens certainly reminds us of the power of nature, and we can certainly see that in the evidence of the 1980 eruption that's all around us. And here we just have an opportunity to see sort of another chapter in its history and to understand the forces that lie beneath our feet.” – Peter Frenzen In 1980, the United States suffered the deadliest and most destructive volcanic eruption in its history when Mount St. Helens literally blew its lid off, the result of seismic activity during the eruption. What made the eruption all the more remarkable is that a fair amount of preparations had gone into anticipating it after an earthquake in the area a few months earlier alerted federal geologists to the possibility of activity there. In fact, Mount St. Helens had been the cause of the earthquake itself, the result of its own lava flows under the surface. Despite the warning signs, the volcanic eruption wound up being so powerful that it devastated hundreds of square miles around it, along with spewing volcanic ash in a giant plume that managed to scatter and deposit ash across 11 different states. Furthermore, another earthquake on May 18 managed to make the north face of the mountain collapse, shocking observers and scientists as it created the largest landslide ever recorded. Taken together, Mount St. Helens ultimately inflicted over $1 billion in damage and killed 57 people, including U.S. scientists studying the volcano on the day it exploded. When President Carter saw the area, he remarked, “Someone said this area looked like a moonscape. But the moon looks more like a golf course compared to what's up there." The 1980 eruption is why so many Americans are familiar with Mount St. Helens today, but it remains an active volcano and was known for volcanic activity back when the Native Americans lived around it. In fact, Native Americans had oral legends to explain the origins of Mount St. Helens, and European explorers and settlers also observed its eruptions in the 19th century. As scientist Peter Frenzen noted, “There's absolutely no question that Mount St. Helens will erupt again. The question is when.” The Eruption of Mount St. Helens chronicles the history of America's most famous volcano and the destruction it wreaked in 1980. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the volcano like never before, in no time at all.

No Apparent Danger

Author: Victoria Bruce
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062011685
Format: PDF, Kindle
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On January 14, 1993, a team of scientists descended into the crater of Galeras, a restless Andean volcano in southern Colombia, for a day of field research. As the group slowly moved across the rocky moonscape of the caldera near the heart of the volcano, Galeras erupted, its crater exploding in a barrage of burning rocks and glowing shrapnel. Nine men died instantly, their bodies torn apart by the blast. While others watched helplessly from the rim, Colombian geologist Marta Calvache raced into the rumbling crater, praying to find survivors. This was Calvache's second volcanic disaster in less than a decade. In 1985 Calvache was part of a group of Colombia's brightest young scientists that had been studying activity at Nevado del Ruiz, a volcano three hundred miles north of Galeras. They had warned of the dire consequences of an eruption for months, but their fledgling coalition lacked the resources and muscle to implement a plan of action or sway public opinion. When Nevado del Ruiz erupted suddenly in November 1985, it wiped the city of Armero off the face of the earth and killed more than twenty-three thousand people -- one of the worst natural disasters of the twentieth century. No Apparent Danger links the characters and events of these two eruptions to tell a riveting story of scientific tragedy and human heroism. In the aftermath of Nevado del Ruiz, volcanologists from all over the world came to Galeras -- some to ensure that such horrors would never be repeated, some to conduct cutting-edge research, and some for personal gain. Seismologists, gas chemists, geologists, and geophysicists hoped to combine their separate areas of expertise to better understand and predict the behavior of monumental forces at work deep within the earth. And yet, despite such expertise, experience, and training, crucial data were ignored or overlooked, essential safety precautions were bypassed, and fifteen people descended into a death trap at Galeras. Incredibly, expedition leader Stanley Williams was one of five who survived, aided bravely by Marta Calvache and her colleagues. But nine others were not so lucky. Expertly detailing the turbulent history of Colombia and the geology of its snow-peaked volcanoes, Victoria Bruce weaves together the stories of the heroes, victims, survivors, and bystanders, evoking with great sensitivity what it means to live in the shadow of a volcano, a hair's-breadth away from unthinkable natural calamity, and shows how clashing cultures and scientific arrogance resulted in tragic and unnecessary loss of life.