Ethnic Minorities in 19th and 20th Century Germany

Author: Panikos Panayi
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317889754
Format: PDF, ePub
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This is the first book to trace the history of all ethnic minorities in Germany during the nineteenth and twentieth-centuries. It argues that all of the different types of states in Germany since 1800 have displayed some level of hostility towards ethnic minorities. While this reached its peak under the Nazis, the book suggests a continuity of intolerance towards ethnic minorities from 1800 that continued into the Federal Republic. During this long period German states were home to three different types of ethnic minorities in the form of- dispersed Jews and Gypsies; localised minorities such as Serbs, Poles and Danes; and immigrants from the 1880s. Taking a chronological approach that runs into the new Millennium, the author traces the history of all of these ethnic groups, illustrating their relationship with the German government and with the rest of the German populace. He demonstrates that Germany provides a perfect testing ground for examining how different forms of rule deal with minorities, including monarchy, liberal democracy, fascism and communism.

Ethnic minorities in nineteenth and twentieth century Germany

Author: Panikos Panayi
Publisher: Longman Pub Group
ISBN: 9780582267718
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This is the first book to trace the history of all ethnic minorities in Germany during the nineteenth and twentieth-centuries Ethnic Minorities in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Germany argues that all of the different types of states in Germany since 1800 have displayed some level of hostility towards ethnic minorities. While this reached its peak under the Nazis, the book suggests a continuity of intolerance towards ethnic minorities from 1800 that continued into the Federal Republic. During this long period German states were home to three different types of ethnic minorities in the form of: dispersed Jews and Gypsies; localized minorities such as Serbs, Poles and Danes; and immigrants from the 1880s. Taking a chronological approach that runs into the new Millennium, Panikos Panayi traces the history of all of these ethnic groups, illustrating their relationship with the German government and with the rest of the German populace. He demonstrates that Germany provides a perfect testing ground for examining how different forms of rule deal with minorities, including monarchy, liberal democracy, fascism and communism.

Fragmented Fatherland

Author: Alexander Clarkson
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 0857459597
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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1945 to 1980 marks an extensive period of mass migration of students, refugees, ex-soldiers, and workers from an extraordinarily wide range of countries to West Germany. Turkish, Kurdish, and Italian groups have been studied extensively, and while this book uses these groups as points of comparison, it focuses on ethnic communities of varying social structures-from Spain, Iran, Ukraine, Greece, Croatia, and Algeria-and examines the interaction between immigrant networks and West German state institutions as well as the ways in which patterns of cooperation and conflict differ. This study demonstrates how the social consequences of mass immigration became intertwined with the ideological battles of Cold War Germany and how the political life and popular movements within these immigrant communities played a crucial role in shaping West German society.

Enemy in our Midst

Author: Panikos Panayi
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 184788184X
Format: PDF, ePub
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With the approach of the First World War, the German community in Britain began to be assailed by a combination of government measures and popular hostility which resulted in attacks against individuals with German connections and confiscation of their property. From May 1915, a policy of wholesale internment and repatriation was to reduce the German population by more than half of its pre-war figure. The author of this study charts the growth of the German community in Britain before detailing the story of its destruction under the chauvinistic intolerance which gripped the country during the Great War.

Why should we teach about the Holocaust

Author: Jolanta Ambrosewicz-Jacobs
Publisher: Judaica Foundation Center for Jewish Culture
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub
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Collection of first-hand accounts of Holocaust survivors, teachers, administrators and polticicans.

The Origins of the Final Solution

Author: Christopher R. Browning
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803203921
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This groundbreaking work is the most detailed, carefully researched, and comprehensive analysis of the evolution of Nazi policy from the persecution and "ethnic cleansing" of Jews in 1939 to the Final Solution of the Holocaust in 1942.

Hitler s Willing Executioners

Author: Daniel Jonah Goldhagen
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 9780307426239
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This groundbreaking international bestseller lays to rest many myths about the Holocaust: that Germans were ignorant of the mass destruction of Jews, that the killers were all SS men, and that those who slaughtered Jews did so reluctantly. Hitler's Willing Executioners provides conclusive evidence that the extermination of European Jewry engaged the energies and enthusiasm of tens of thousands of ordinary Germans. Goldhagen reconstructs the climate of "eliminationist anti-Semitism" that made Hitler's pursuit of his genocidal goals possible and the radical persecution of the Jews during the 1930s popular. Drawing on a wealth of unused archival materials, principally the testimony of the killers themselves, Goldhagen takes us into the killing fields where Germans voluntarily hunted Jews like animals, tortured them wantonly, and then posed cheerfully for snapshots with their victims. From mobile killing units, to the camps, to the death marches, Goldhagen shows how ordinary Germans, nurtured in a society where Jews were seen as unalterable evil and dangerous, willingly followed their beliefs to their logical conclusion. "Hitler's Willing Executioner's is an original, indeed brilliant contribution to the...literature on the Holocaust."--New York Review of Books "The most important book ever published about the Holocaust...Eloquently written, meticulously documented, impassioned...A model of moral and scholarly integrity."--Philadelphia Inquirer From the Trade Paperback edition.

An Immigration History of Britain

Author: Panikos Panayi
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317864220
Format: PDF, ePub
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Immigration, ethnicity, multiculturalism and racism have become part of daily discourse in Britain in recent decades – yet, far from being new, these phenomena have characterised British life since the 19th century. While the numbers of immigrants increased after the Second World War, groups such as the Irish, Germans and East European Jews have been arriving, settling and impacting on British society from the Victorian period onwards. In this comprehensive and fascinating account, Panikos Panayi examines immigration as an ongoing process in which ethnic communities evolve as individuals choose whether to retain their ethnic identities and customs or to integrate and assimilate into wider British norms. Consequently, he tackles the contradictions in the history of immigration over the past two centuries: migration versus government control; migrant poverty versus social mobility; ethnic identity versus increasing Anglicisation; and, above all, racism versus multiculturalism. Providing an important historical context to contemporary debates, and taking into account the complexity and variety of individual experiences over time, this book demonstrates that no simple approach or theory can summarise the migrant experience in Britain.