European Comparative Company Law

Author: Mads Tønnesson Andenæs
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521842190
Format: PDF, Kindle
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An examination of important aspects of the company laws of seven European countries.

Comparative Company Law

Author: Mathias Siems
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1509909354
Format: PDF
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As attention moves rapidly towards comparative approaches, the research and teaching of company law has somehow lagged behind. The overall purpose of this book is therefore to fill a gap in the literature by identifying whether conceptual differences between countries exist. Rather than concentrate on whether the institutional structure of the corporation varies across jurisdictions, the objective of this book will be pursued by focusing on specific cases and how different countries might treat each of these cases. The book also has a public policy dimension, because the existence or absence of differences may lead to the question of whether formal harmonisation of company law is necessary. The book covers 12 legal systems from different legal traditions and from different parts of the world (though with a special emphasis on European countries). In alphabetical order, those countries are: Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Latvia, the Netherlands, Poland, South Africa, Spain, the UK, and the US. All of these jurisdictions are subjected to scrutiny by deploying a comparative case-based study. On the basis of these case solutions, various conclusions are reached, some of which challenge established orthodoxies in the field of comparative company law.

Comparative Company Law

Author: Andreas Cahn
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107186358
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Presents in-depth, comparative analyses of German, UK and US company laws illustrated by leading cases, with German cases in English translation.

European Company Law

Author: Nicola de Luca
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107184185
Format: PDF
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Taking a text, cases and materials approach, this is the first and only student textbook on European company law, providing an insight into the subject and shedding light on its future development. Textboxes for explanatory commentary, cases and materials - such as EU legislation, official documents and excerpts from scholarly papers - are clearly differentiated from the text, allowing the student to quickly identify sources. Each chapter also includes suggestions for further reading. Structured in seven parts, the book explores a diversity of topics, from what European company law is, the common rules for establishing, financing and accounting a company, and corporate governance, to the structure of the Societas Europaeca Statute, EU company law directives, capital markets and takeover law, and insolvency. An essential resource for the growing number of graduate courses on European company law, European business law, and comparative corporate law.

Harmonization of company law in Europe

Author: Jochen Müller
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 3638515346
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Seminar paper from the year 2002 in the subject Law - Comparative Legal Systems, Comparative Law, grade: ECTS-Note A (Excellent), University of Bergen (Juristische Fakultät), course: Comparative Company Law, 9 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: European law is a daily reality. The legislation and, correspondingly, the extend of regulations given by the written primary and secondary European Union (EU) law becomes so densely, meanwhile almost as densely as it was hitherto only known from the national regulations system. Consequently, e.g. in Germany, more than 50 per cent of all administrative decisions on federal, state or communal level are taken on basis of regulations coming from Brussels - not everybody is aware of this development yet. From a theoretical point of view, this EU-legislation can be divided into two different types of rules. One type, of course, are the rules passed by the EU-legislator which create new fields of law. This is regularly then the case if supranational European institutions are founded. The by far bigger part of EU-legislation is, however, that type which consists of rules created to harmonize the regulations already existing on national level in the Member States in order to lighten the burden of friction caused by 12 different (not to talk about the future developments, namely the East-Enlargement of the European Union) systems within the EU in the age of globalization, especially seen from an economical point of few. Again, from a theoretical point of view, the legislative instrument of harmonization can be divided into two categories. The first can be described as assimilation and adjustment. It is meant to bring the differing national regulations in one subject of matter, e.g. company law, in a kind of mainstream, i.e. to co-ordinate and to make them similar but not necessarily uniform. The Commission in that case normally uses directives for harmonization of law. The Member States then are obliged to set up their own legislation in a manner that the principle of effectiveness of the EU-rules is not infringed but promoted. Nevertheless, there is room for keeping alive typical and traditional national characteristics of legislation. The second category of harmonization can be described as standardization or, even stronger, unification of law. In that case the means of EU-regulation is used. It takes away the freedom of the Member States to design and set up harmonized rules in their own responsibility. An EU-regulation is binding upon every Member State and it has immediate validity. Thus, unlimited availability of the same law throughout the whole Community is, ideally, being achieved.

The Anatomy of Corporate Law

Author: Ezra Ripley Thayer Professor of Law Reinier Kraakman
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019873963X
Format: PDF, ePub
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This is the long-awaited third edition of this highly regarded comparative overview of corporate law. This edition has been comprehensively revised and updated to reflect the profound changes in corporate law and governance practices that have taken place since the previous edition. These include numerous regulatory changes following the financial crisis of 2007-09 and the changing landscape of governance, especially in the US, with the ever more central role of institutional investors as (active) owners of corporations. The geographic scope of the coverage has been broadened to include an important emerging economy, Brazil. In addition, the book now incorporates analysis of the burgeoning use of corporate law to protect the interests of "external constituencies" without any contractual relationship to a company, in an attempt to tackle broader social and economic problems. The authors start from the premise that corporations (or companies) in all jurisdictions share the same key legal attributes: legal personality, limited liability, delegated management, transferable shares, and investor ownership. Businesses using the corporate form give rise to three basic types of agency problems: those between managers and shareholders as a class; controlling shareholders and minority shareholders; and shareholders as a class and other corporate constituencies, such as corporate creditors and employees. After identifying the common set of legal strategies used to address these agency problems and discussing their interaction with enforcement institutions, The Anatomy of Corporate Law illustrates how a number of core jurisdictions around the world deploy such strategies. In so doing, the book highlights the many commonalities across jurisdictions and reflects on the reasons why they may differ on specific issues. The analysis covers the basic governance structure of the corporation, including the powers of the board of directors and the shareholder meeting, both when management and when a dominant shareholder is in control. It then analyses the role of corporate law in shaping labor relationships, protection of external stakeholders, relationships with creditors, related-party transactions, fundamental corporate actions such as mergers and charter amendments, takeovers, and the regulation of capital markets. The Anatomy of Corporate Law has established itself as the leading book in the field of comparative corporate law. Across the world, students and scholars at various stages in their careers, from undergraduate law students to well-established authorities in the field, routinely consult this book as a starting point for their inquiries.

Comparative Corporate Governance

Author: Petri Mäntysaari
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9783540264606
Format: PDF
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An analytical overview of the regulation of shareholder activism in the UK and Germany. The book shows how the comparative legal method can be used in the study of the corporate governance systems of different countries. It deals with the regulation of the governance of listed companies within a wide framework that recognises the importance of company law, securities markets law, standards and internal rule-making.

Corporate Boards in European Law

Author: Paul Davies
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198705158
Format: PDF, Docs
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This book analyses corporate boards; their regulation in law and codes, and their actual operation in ten European countries in a functional and comparative method. Issues addressed include: board structure, composition and functioning, enforcement by liability rules, incentive structures and shareholder activism.

The Control of Non Cash Contributions to Companies

Author: Yitayal Mekonnen Ayalew
Publisher: GRIN Verlag
ISBN: 3640710274
Format: PDF, ePub
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Master's Thesis from the year 2010 in the subject Business economics - Law, grade: A, Central European University Budapest (Law Faculty), course: Law of Corporations, language: English, abstract: Abstract The capital of a company is considered as security for creditors and legal systems provide the framework to safeguard this security. This paper demonstrates overvaluation of non-cash contributions as a risk this security is to be safeguarded from. It outlines what a cmprehensive control system on non-cash contributions looks like and comparatively assesses the laws of the EC, Germany, France, England, and Ethiopia as to the mechanisms they provide to control this form of contribution. The paper shows that the three member states of of the EC have transposed the Community law on the subject of control of non-cash contributions in a similar fashion and that they converge on a number of areas regarding their approaches to controlling non-cash contributions like definition of valid forms of tnon-cash contributions and the expert valuation , payment and disclosure requirements. The above three legal systems are selected because of their relevance to the Ethiopian law for they are the sources of the latter’s Commercial Code. Compared to these legal systems, the control system over non-csh-contributions under the Ethiopian law involves a number of matters that need addressed through amendement of the law.

The Governing Law of Companies in EU Law

Author: Justin Borg-Barthet
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1847319270
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The manner in which the governing law of companies is determined has attracted much attention from academics and practitioners alike ever since the European Court of Justice began receiving references for preliminary rulings regarding the compatibility of protective conflict of corporate law norms with the EC Treaty provisions concerning freedom of establishment. Although recent developments have been less controversial than the ground-breaking judgment in Centros, they have not only consolidated the general thrust of liberalisation occasioned by the Court of Justice, but have added new dimensions to the regulatory landscape. These developments include amendments to the European constitutional order enshrined in the Lisbon Treaty, European legislation on cross-border mergers, the proposed statute for a European Private Company, the judgment of the Court of Justice in Cartesio and a Commission communication that contemplates the introduction of legislation on the governing law of companies. This book examines these recent developments and appraises the current law, as well as the foreseeable trajectory of the law, within a theoretical setting that addresses the socio-economic and legal-theoretical concerns associated with choices of the governing law of companies. In addition to considering the present and probable future state of EU law, the book also develops new theoretical perspectives and proposes novel solutions to long-standing dilemmas. In particular, it suggests that the use of information technology may render possible previously impossible compromises between party autonomy and the proper locus of prescriptive sovereignty.