Exploration and Meaning Making in the Learning of Science

Author: Bernard Zubrowski
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9789048124961
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Mountaineers, Rock Climbers, and Science Educators Around the 1920s, rock climbing separated from mountaineering to become a separate sport. At that time European climbers developed new equipment and techniques, enabling them to ascend mountain faces and to climb rocks, which were considered unassailable up to that time. American climbers went further by expanding and improving on the equipment. They even developed a system of quantification where points were given for the degree of difficulty of an ascent. This system focused primarily on the pitch of the mountain, and it even calculated up to de- mals to give a high degree of quantification. Rock climbing became a technical system. Csikszentmihaly (1976) observed that the sole interest of rock climbers at that time was to climb the rock. Rock climbers were known to reach the top and not even glance around at the scenery. The focus was on reaching the top of the rock. In contrast, mountaineers saw the whole mountain as a single “unit of perc- tion. ” “The ascent (to them) is a gestalt including the aesthetic, historical, personal and physical sensations” (Csikszentmihaly, 1976, p. 486). This is an example of two contrasting approaches to the same kind of landscape and of two different groups of people. Interestingly, in the US, Europe, and Japan a large segment of the early rock climbers were young mathematicians and theoretical physicists, while the mountaineers were a more varied lot.

Science Literacy in Primary Schools and Pre Schools

Author: Haim Eshach
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 140204674X
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This well-written and thought-provoking book presents the state-of-the-art in science education for kindergarten and primary schools. It begins with a thorough theoretical discussion on why it is incumbent on the science educator to teach science at first stages of childhood. It goes on to analyze and synthesize a broad range of educational approaches and themes. The book also presents novel strategies to science teaching.

Expanding Notions of Assessment for Learning

Author: Bronwen Cowie
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9462090610
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Assessment for learning [AfL] is bound up with students becoming autonomous lifelong learners who are active participants in the classroom and beyond. This book explores teacher and student experiences of AfL interactions in primary science and technology classrooms. Working from a sociocultural perspective, the book’s fundamental premise is that AfL has a contribution to make to students developing identities as accomplished learners and knowers. The focus is on understanding and enhancing teacher practices that align with the spirit of AfL. The following points are illustrated: • AfL interactions are multifaceted, multimodal and take place over multiple time scales. • Student learning autonomy is promoted when teachers provide opportunities for students to exercise agency within a system of accountabilities. • Teacher pedagogical content knowledge plays a pivotal role in teachers being able to respond to students. • Productive AfL interactions are reflective of the way a particular discipline generates and warrants knowledge. The book will be of interest to teachers and educational researchers who want to examine AfL from a theoretical and a practical perspective

International Handbook of Research on Environmental Education

Author: Robert B. Stevenson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136699317
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The environment and contested notions of sustainability are increasingly topics of public interest, political debate, and legislation across the world. Environmental education journals now publish research from a wide variety of methodological traditions that show linkages between the environment, health, development, and education. The growth in scholarship makes this an opportune time to review and synthesize the knowledge base of the environmental education (EE) field. The purpose of this 51-chapter handbook is not only to illuminate the most important concepts, findings and theories that have been developed by EE research, but also to critically examine the historical progression of the field, its current debates and controversies, what is still missing from the EE research agenda, and where that agenda might be headed. Published for the American Educational Research Association (AERA).

Imaginative Science Education

Author: Yannis Hadzigeorgiou
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319295268
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This book is about imaginative approaches to teaching and learning school science. Its central premise is that science learning should reflect the nature of science, and therefore be approached as an imaginative/creative activity. As such, the book can be seen as an original contribution of ideas relating to imagination and creativity in science education. The approaches discussed in the book are storytelling, the experience of wonder, the development of ‘romantic understanding’, and creative science, including science through visual art, poetry and dramatization. However, given the perennial problem of how to engage students (of all ages) in science, the notion of ‘aesthetic experience’, and hence the possibility for students to have more holistic and fulfilling learning experiences through the aforementioned imaginative approaches, is also discussed. Each chapter provides an in-depth discussion of the theoretical background of a specific imaginative approach (e.g., storytelling, ‘wonder-full’ science), reviews the existing empirical evidence regarding its role in the learning process, and points out its implications for pedagogy and instructional practices. Examples from physical science illustrating its implementation in the classroom are also discussed. In distinguishing between ‘participation in a science activity’ and ‘engagement with science ideas per se’, the book emphasizes the central role of imaginative engagement with science content knowledge, and thus the potential of the recommended imaginative approaches to attract students to the world of science.

A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Author: Heather Fry
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317650220
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This entirely new edition of a very successful book focuses on developing professional academic skills for supporting and supervising student learning and effective teaching. It is built on the premise that the roles of those who teach in higher education are complex and multi-faceted. A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education is sensitive to the competing demands of teaching, research, scholarship, and academic management. The new edition reflects and responds to the rapidly changing context of higher education and to current understanding of how to best support student learning. Drawing together a large number of expert authors, it continues to feature extensive use of case studies that show how successful teachers have implemented these ideas. It includes key topics such as student engagement and motivation, internationalisation, employability, inclusive strategies for teaching, effective use of technology and issues relating to postgraduate students and student retention. Part 1 explores a number of aspects of the context of UK higher education that affect the education of students, looking at the drivers of institutional behaviours and how to achieve success as a university teacher. Part 2 examines learning, teaching and supervising in higher education and includes chapters on working with diversity, encouraging independent learning and learning gain. Part 3 considers approaches to teaching and learning in different disciplines, covering a full range including arts and humanities, social sciences, experimental sciences through to medicine and dentistry. Written to support the excellence in teaching and learning design required to bring about student learning of the highest quality, this will be essential reading for all new lecturers, particularly anyone taking an accredited course in teaching and learning in higher education, as well as those experienced lecturers who wish to improve their teaching practice. Those working in adult learning and educational development will also find the book to be a particularly useful resource. In addition it will appeal to staff who support learning and teaching in various other roles.

Progressing Science Education

Author: Keith S. Taber
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 904812431X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Exploring one of the central themes in science education theory, this volume examines how science education can be considered as a scientific activity within a broad post-positivist notion of science. Many students find learning science extremely problematic, whatever level of education they have reached. At the end of the 1970s a new approach to tackling learning difficulties in science was developed, drawing on ideas from psychology and cognitive science, and centred on the way students build up new knowledge in reference to their existing ideas. ‘Constructivism’ became the dominant paradigm in science education research for two decades, spawning a vast body of literature reporting aspects of learners’ ideas in different science topics. However, Constructivism came under fire as it was recognised that the research did not offer immediate and simple prescriptions for effective science teaching. The whole approach was widely criticised, in particular by those who saw it as having ‘anti-science’ leanings. In this book, the notion of scientific research programmes is used to understand the development, limitations and potential of constructivism. It is shown that constructivist work in science education fits into a coherent programme exploring the contingencies of learning science. The author goes further to address criticisms of constructivism; evaluate progress in the field; and suggest directions for future research. It is concluded that constructivism has provided the foundations for a progressive research programme that continues to guide enquiry into learning and teaching science.

Educational Effectiveness and Ineffectiveness

Author: Jaap Scheerens
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9401774595
Format: PDF, Docs
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This book is a critical assessment of the knowledge base on educational effectiveness, covering a period of five decades of research. It formulates a “lean” theory of good schooling, and identifies and explains instances of “ineffectiveness”, such as low effect sizes of malleable conditions, for which expectations are highly strung. The book presents a systemic outlook on educational effectiveness and improvement, as it starts out from an integrated multi-level model that comprises system level, school level and instructional conditions. It offers a classification of school improvement strategies and scenarios for system level educational improvement. Above all, the analysis is very systematic, comprehensive and strongly grounded in theory. The book includes a case study analysis of various strands of improvement-oriented educational policy in the Netherlands as an illustration of some of the arguments used.

Video Research in the Learning Sciences

Author: Ricki Goldman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135604053
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Video Research in the Learning Sciences is a comprehensive exploration of key theoretical, methodological, and technological advances concerning uses of digital video-as-data in the learning sciences as a way of knowing about learning, teaching, and educational processes. The aim of the contributors, a community of scholars using video in their own work, is to help usher in video scholarship and supportive technologies, and to mentor video scholars, so that video research will meet its maximum potential to contribute to the growing knowledge base about teaching and learning. This volume contributes deeply to both to the science of learning through in-depth video studies of human interaction in learning environments—whether classrooms or other contexts—and to the uses of video for creating descriptive, explanatory, or expository accounts of learning and teaching. It is designed around four themes—each with a cornerstone chapter that introduces and synthesizes the cluster of chapters related to it: Theoretical frameworks for video research; Video research on peer, family, and informal learning; Video research on classroom and teacher learning; and Video collaboratories and technological futures. Video Research in the Learning Sciences is intended for researchers, university faculty, teacher educators, and graduate students in education, and for anyone interested in how knowledge is expanded using video-based technologies for inquiries about learning and teaching. Visit the Web site affiliated with this book: www.videoresearch.org

French and Creole in Louisiana

Author: Albert Valdman
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1475752784
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Leading specialists on Cajun French and Louisiana Creole examine dialectology and sociolinguistics in this volume, the first comprehensive treatment of the linguistic situation of francophone Louisiana and its relation to the current development of French in North America outside of Quebec. Topics discussed include: language shift and code mixing speaker attitudes the role of schools and media in the maintenance of these languages and such language planning initiatives as the CODOFIL program to revive the sue of French in Louisiana. £/LIST£