Female imperialism and national identity

Author: Katie Pickles
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 1847795625
Format: PDF, ePub
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Through a study of the British Empire's largest women's patriotic organisation, formed in 1900, and still in existence, this book examines the relationship between female imperialism and national identity. It throws new light on women's involvement in imperialism; on the history of 'conservative' women's organisations; on women's interventions in debates concerning citizenship and national identity; and on the history of women in white settler societies. After placing the IODE (Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire) in the context of recent scholarly work in Canadian, gender, imperial history and post-colonial theory, the book follows the IODE's history through the twentieth century. Tracing the organisation into the postcolonial era, where previous imperial ideas are outmoded, it considers the transformation from patriotism to charity, and the turn to colonisation at home in the Canadian North.

Women and the Orange Order

Author: D MacPherson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 1526113562
Format: PDF, Docs
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Women and the Orange Order examines the growth and activism of Orange women in England, Scotland and Canada since the mid-nineteenth century and argues that they were central to the development of Orange associational culture up to the Second World War. This study also explores how women were key participants in the formation of diasporic connections throughout the British world, building on links created by migration and the Empire. It reveals that the ordinary - and largely working-class - women who joined the Orange Order eagerly engaged in the public lives of their communities, in conservative politics and in upholding the ideologies of the British Empire. In its examination of gender, ethnicity, class and imperialism, Women and the Orange Order will appeal to readers interested in the history of the Irish diaspora, women's public activism and the British Empire.

A Great Rural Sisterhood

Author: Linda M. Ambrose
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442669020
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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As the founding president of the Associated Country Women of the World (ACWW), Madge Robertson Watt (1868–1948) turned imperialism on its head. During the First World War, Watt imported the “made-in-Canada” concept of Women’s Institutes – voluntary associations of rural women – to the British countryside. In the interwar years, she capitalized on the success of the Institutes to help create the ACWW, a global organization of rural women. A feminist imperialist and a liberal internationalist, Watt was central to the establishment of two organizations which remain active around the world today. In A Great Rural Sisterhood, Linda M. Ambrose uses a wealth of archival materials from both sides of the Atlantic to tell the story of Watt’s remarkable life, from her early years as a Toronto journalist to her retirement and memorialization after the Second World War.

Contesting Bodies and Nation in Canadian History

Author: Patrizia Gentile
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442663162
Format: PDF, Kindle
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From fur coats to nude paintings, and from sports to beauty contests, the body has been central to the literal and figurative fashioning of ourselves as individuals and as a nation. In this first collection on the history of the body in Canada, an interdisciplinary group of scholars explores the multiple ways the body has served as a site of contestation in Canadian history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Showcasing a variety of methodological approaches, Contesting Bodies and Nation in Canadian History includes essays on many themes that engage with the larger historical relationship between the body and nation: medicine and health, fashion and consumer culture, citizenship and work, and more. The contributors reflect on the intersections of bodies with the concept of nationhood, as well as how understandings of the body are historically contingent. The volume is capped off with a critical introductory chapter by the editors on the history of bodies and the development of the body as a category of analysis.

Female Embodiment and Subjectivity in the Modernist Novel

Author: Renée Dickinson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136603522
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This study considers the work of two experimental British women modernists writing in the tumultuous interwar period--Virginia Woolf and Olive Moore--by examining four crucial incarnations of female embodiment and subjectivity: female bodies, geographical imagery, national ideology and textual experimentation. Dickinson proposes that the ways Mrs. Dalloway, and The Waves by Virginia Woolf and Spleen and Fugue by Olive Moore reflect, expose and criticize physical, geographical and national bodies in the narrative and form of their texts reveal the authors’ attempts to try on new forms and experiment with new possibilities of female embodiment and subjectivity.

Body Knowledge

Author: Mary Simonson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199898030
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This book traces the deployment of intermedial aesthetics in the works of early twentieth-century female performers. By destabilizing medial and genre boundaries, these women created compelling and meaningful performances that negotiated turn-of-the-century American social and cultural issues.

Edwardian Ladies and Imperial Power

Author: Julia Bush
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 9780718500610
Format: PDF
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Bush (arts and social sciences, Nene University College, Northampton) analyzes aristocratic and upper-middle-class women's involvement in imperialist associations, and investigates their relationship with male imperialist leaders and the male-dominated patriotic leagues during the early 20th century. She also looks at their work with female emigration, education, colonial hospitality, and imperial race- thinking. She concludes that personal motivation, organizational methods, and patriotic faith were embedded in a social and political context that empowered elite women in selective, gender-related ways.

Sociological Abstracts

Author: Leo P. Chall
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub
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CSA Sociological Abstracts abstracts and indexes the international literature in sociology and related disciplines in the social and behavioral sciences. The database provides abstracts of journal articles and citations to book reviews drawn from over 1,800+ serials publications, and also provides abstracts of books, book chapters, dissertations, and conference papers.

Gatekeepers

Author: Franca Iacovetta
Publisher: Between the Lines(CA)
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Docs
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An in-depth study of European immigrants to Canada during the Cold War, Gatekeepers explores the interactions among these immigrants and the "gatekeepers"-mostly middle-class individuals and institutions whose definitions of citizenship significantly shaped the immigrant experience. Iacovetta's deft discussion examines how dominant bourgeois gender and Cold War ideologies of the day shaped attitudes towards new Canadians. She shows how the new comers themselves were significant actors who influenced Canadian culture and society, even as their own behaviour was being modified. Generously illustrated, Gatekeepers explores a side of Cold War history that has been left largely untapped. It offers a long overdue Canadian perspective on one of the defining eras of the last century. Click the 'Review Quote' link below to read reviews and endorsements of Gatekeepers