Firestorm at Peshtigo

Author: Denise Gess
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780805072938
Format: PDF
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Re-creates the events of the most devastating fire in American history, documenting the conflagration that swept through Peshtigo, Wisconsin, on October 8, 1871--the same night as the Great Chicago Fire--incinerating more than 2,400 square miles of land, obliterating Peshtigo, and killing more than two thousand people. Reprint. 17,500 first printing.

Firestorm at Peshtigo

Author: Denise Gess
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780805067804
Format: PDF
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Documents the conflagration that swept through Peshtigo, Wisconsin, on October 8, 1871--the same night as the Great Chicago Fire--incinerating more than 2,400 square miles of land and killing more than two thousand people.

The Great Peshtigo Fire

Author: Scott Knickelbine
Publisher: Wisconsin Historical Society
ISBN: 0870206028
Format: PDF, Kindle
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On the night of October 8, 1871, a whirlwind of fire swept through northeastern Wisconsin, destroying the bustling frontier town of Peshtigo. Trees, buildings, and people burst into flames. Metal melted. Sand turned into glass. People thought the end of the world had come. When the “tornado of fire” was over, 2,500 people were dead, and Peshtigo was nothing but a smoking ruin. It was the deadliest wildfire in U.S. history. The Great Peshtigo Fire: Stories and Science from America’s Deadliest Firestorm explores the history, science, and legacy of the 1871 Peshtigo Fire at a fourth-grade reading level. Readers will learn about the history of settlement, agriculture, and forestry in 19th-century Wisconsin. This illuminating text covers a diverse range of topics that will enrich the reader’s understanding of the Peshtigo Fire, including the building and land-use practices of the time that made the area ripe for such a fire, the weather patterns that fostered widespread fires throughout the upper Midwest in the summer and fall of 1871, and exciting first-person accounts that vividly bring the `victims’ stories to life. Connections made between the Peshtigo Fire and the history of fire prevention in the United States encourage critical thinking about issues that remain controversial to this day, such as planned burns and housing development restrictions near forested areas. The Great Peshtigo Fire: Stories and Science from America’s Deadliest Firestorm will inform and captivate its readers as it journeys through the horrifying history of the Peshtigo Fire.

The Great Peshtigo Fire

Author: Peter Pernin
Publisher: Wisconsin Historical Society
ISBN: 0870206842
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Reverend Peter Pernin was the parish priest for Peshtigo and nearby Marinette, whose churches burned to the ground. He published his account of the fire in 1874. The late William Converse Haygood served as editor of the Wisconsin Magazine of History from 1957 to 1975. He prepared this version of Father Pernin's account on the occasion of the Peshtigo Fire's centennial in 1971. Foreword writer Stephen J. Pyne is a professor at Arizona State University in Tempe and author of numerous books on wildland fire, including Fire in America.

The Peshtigo Fire of 1871

Author: Charles River Editors
Publisher: CreateSpace
ISBN: 9781500896911
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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*Includes pictures *Includes witness accounts of the fire *Includes a bibliography for further reading "Why is this story not known? You see endless stories about Johnstown. What happened at Peshtigo makes Johnstown look like a birdbath." - Bill Lutz, co-author of Firestorm at Peshtigo "The air burned hotter than a crematorium and the fire traveled at 90 mph. I read an account of a Civil War veteran who had been through some of the worst battles of the war. He described the sound - the roar - during the fire as 100 times greater than any artillery bombardment." - Bill Lutz In arguably the most famous fire in American history, a blaze in the southwestern section of Chicago began to burn out of control on the night of October 8, 1871. It had taken about 40 years for Chicago to grow from a small settlement of about 300 people into a thriving metropolis with a population of 300,000, but in just two days in 1871, much of that progress was burned to the ground. Due to the publicity generated by a fire that reduced most of a major American city to ash, the Peshtigo Fire of 1871 might fairly be called America's forgotten disaster. Overshadowed by the much better covered and publicized Great Chicago Fire that occurred on the same evening, the fire that started in the Wisconsin logging town of Peshtigo generated a firestorm unlike anything in American history. In addition to destroying a wide swath of land, it killed at least 1,500 people and possibly as many as 2,500, several times more than the number of casualties in Chicago. While people marveled at the fact that the Great Chicago Fire managed to jump a river, the Peshtigo fire was so intense that it was able to jump several miles across Green Bay. While wondering aloud about the way in which the Peshtigo fire has been overlooked, Bill Lutz noted, "Fires are normally very fascinating to people, but people seem resistant to Peshtigo. Maybe Peshtigo is on such a large scale that people can't comprehend it." Ironically, while Peshtigo is widely forgotten, the fire there is often cited as proof that the Great Chicago Fire was caused by natural phenomena, such as a comet or meteor shower. Those advocating such a theory think it's too coincidental that such disastrous fires were sparked in the same region on the same night, and they point to other fires across the Midwest. Of course, as with the Great Chicago Fire, contemporaries of the Peshtigo fire faulted human error and didn't necessarily link the two fires, if only because fires were a common problem in both Peshtigo and Chicago during the 19th century. The Peshtigo Fire of 1871 chronicles the story America's deadliest fire. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Peshtigo fire like never before, in no time at all.

Under a Flaming Sky

Author: Daniel Brown
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1493022016
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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On September 1, 1894 two forest fires converged on the town of Hinckley, Minnesota, trapping over 2,000 people. Daniel J. Brown recounts the events surrounding the fire in the first and only book on to chronicle the dramatic story that unfolded. Whereas Oregon's famous "Biscuit" fire in 2002 burned 350,000 acres in one week, the Hinckley fire did the same damage in five hours. The fire created its own weather, including hurricane-strength winds, bubbles of plasma-like glowing gas, and 200-foot-tall flames. In some instances, "fire whirls," or tornadoes of fire, danced out from the main body of the fire to knock down buildings and carry flaming debris into the sky. Temperatures reached 1,600 degrees Fahrenheit--the melting point of steel. As the fire surrounded the town, two railroads became the only means of escape. Two trains ran the gauntlet of fire. One train caught on fire from one end to the other. The heroic young African-American porter ran up and down the length of the train, reassuring the passengers even as the flames tore at their clothes. On the other train, the engineer refused to back his locomotive out of town until the last possible minute of escape. In all, more than 400 people died, leading to a revolution in forestry management practices and federal agencies that monitor and fight wildfires today. Author Daniel Brown has woven together numerous survivors' stories, historical sources, and interviews with forest fire experts in a gripping narrative that tells the fascinating story of one of North America's most devastating fires and how it changed the nation.

Colors of the Firestorm

Author: Linda Brieno
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781432770174
Format: PDF, Kindle
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THE FIREIt was the deadliest fire in North America. In less than 16 hours, 1.8 million acres2,400 square milesburned. People fled. There was no time to react. Thousands of lives were lost. But no help came. THE HEROESJean Pierre and Father Peter Pernin. A half-breed Indian and a priest. Two contrasting characters collide, Native American vs. Catholic beliefs, destined to lead the people through. THE MYSTERYWhy did it happen? The Great Peshtigo Fire of 1871 is lost somewhere in history even though it is still listed among Americas top ten worst natural disasters. Nobody ever determined the cause. Theories exist, yet none can match the vivid descriptions of actual eye witnesses.

Ghosts of the Fireground

Author: Peter M. Leschak
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062517783
Format: PDF
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A firefighter's remarkable first–hand account of the lessons of tragedy, courage and faith in the epic struggle between man and fire. In April of 2000, on the brink of one of the most ferocious fire seasons ever recorded, Peter Leschak discovers the diary of Father Pernin, one of the few survivors of a wildfire that hit Peshtigo, Wisconsin, in 1871. Throughout this harrowing summer, Leschak takes us through Pernin's dangerous clash with the Great Peshtigo Fire while reflecting on his own journey from the ministry to fireground leader. In so doing, Leschak captures the sacred and mysterious pull of the fireground and breathes life into one of the most astounding and little–known disasters to ever hit this country. Ghosts of the Fireground weaves seamlessly between Father Pernin's struggle with an inferno so hot that not even the Peshtigo River guaranteed safety to Peter Leschak's breathtaking frontline battles 130 years later, offering a compelling look at the courageous and noble pursuit that is wildland firefighting.

Chicago Death Trap

Author: Nat Brandt
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 080932721X
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A blow-by-blow account of the deadliest fire in American history retraces the final days of the Iroquois Theatre in Chicago, a supposedly indestructible building that burned killing more than six hundred people.

Disasters and Tragic Events An Encyclopedia of Catastrophes in American History 2 volumes

Author: Mitchell Newton-Matza
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1610691660
Format: PDF, Docs
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From the Salem Witch Trials of 1692 to the Sandy Hook school massacre of 2012, this two-volume encyclopedia surveys tragic events—natural and man-made, famous and forgotten—that helped shape American history. • Covers a wide range of topics, from the infamous to the obscure • Places each event in context, giving it deeper meaning and showing its impact • Includes primary source material from U.S. Supreme Court cases, presidential speeches, eyewitness accounts, state and federal legislation, and federal government investigations • Brings the events it covers to life through photos and illustrations