First Person

Author: Noah Wardrip-Fruin
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262232326
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The relationship between story and game, and related questions of electronic writing and play, examined through a series of discussions among new media creators and theorists.

First Person

Author: Noah Wardrip-Fruin
Publisher: MIT Press (MA)
ISBN: 9780262731751
Format: PDF, Docs
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Electronic games have established a huge international market, significantly outselling non-digital games; people spend more money on The Sims than on "Monopoly" or even on "Magic: the Gathering." Yet it is widely believed that the market for electronic literature -- predicted by some to be the future of the written word -- languishes. Even bestselling author Stephen King achieved disappointing results with his online publication of "Riding the Bullet" and "The Plant."Isn't it possible, though, that many hugely successful computer games -- those that depend on or at least utilize storytelling conventions of narrative, character, and theme -- can be seen as examples of electronic literature? And isn't it likely that the truly significant new forms of electronic literature will prove to be (like games) so deeply interactive and procedural that it would be impossible to present them as paper-like "e-books"? The editors of First Person have gathered a remarkably diverse group of new media theorists and practitioners to consider the relationship between "story" and "game," as well as the new kinds of artistic creation (literary, performative, playful) that have become possible in the digital environment.This landmark collection is organized as a series of discussions among creators and theorists; each section includes three presentations, with each presentation followed by two responses. Topics considered range from "Cyberdrama" to "Ludology" (the study of games), to "The Pixel/The Line" to "Beyond Chat." The conversational structure inspired contributors to revise, update, and expand their presentations as they prepared them for the book, and the panel discussions have overflowed into a First Person web site (created in conjunction with the online journal Electronic Book Review).

First Person

Author: Noah Wardrip-Fruin
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780262335201
Format: PDF
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"Electronic games have established a huge international market, significantly outselling non-digital games; people spend more money on The Sims than on 'Monopoly' or even on 'Magic: the Gathering.' Yet it is widely believed that the market for electronic literature—predicted by some to be the future of the written word—languishes. Even bestselling author Stephen King achieved disappointing results with his online publication of 'Riding the Bullet' and 'The Plant.' Isn’t it possible, though, that many hugely successful computer games--those that depend on or at least utilize storytelling conventions of narrative, character, and theme--can be seen as examples of electronic literature? And isn’t it likely that the truly significant new forms of electronic literature will prove to be (like games) so deeply interactive and procedural that it would be impossible to present them as paper-like 'e-books'? The editors of First Person have gathered a remarkably diverse group of new media theorists and practitioners to consider the relationship between 'story' and 'game,' as well as the new kinds of artistic creation (literary, performative, playful) that have become possible in the digital environment"--Provider website.

The NewMediaReader

Author: Noah Wardrip-Fruin
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262232272
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A sourcebook of historical written texts, video documentation, and working programs that form the foundation of new media.

Expressive Processing

Author: Noah Wardrip-Fruin
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262302683
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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What matters in understanding digital media? Is looking at the external appearance and audience experience of software enough -- or should we look further? In Expressive Processing, Noah Wardrip-Fruin argues that understanding what goes on beneath the surface, the computational processes that make digital media function, is essential. Wardrip-Fruin looks at "expressive processing" by examining specific works of digital media ranging from the simulated therapist Eliza to the complex city-planning game SimCity. Digital media, he contends, offer particularly intelligible examples of things we need to understand about software in general; if we understand, for instance, the capabilities and histories of artificial intelligence techniques in the context of a computer game, we can use that understanding to judge the use of similar techniques in such higher-stakes social contexts as surveillance.

Twisty Little Passages

Author: Nick Montfort
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262633185
Format: PDF, Kindle
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An introduction to interactive fiction, exploring the form from gaming and literary perspectives.

Gaming

Author: Alexander R. Galloway
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 1452908680
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Video games have been a central feature of the cultural landscape for over twenty years and now rival older media like movies, television, and music in popularity and cultural influence. Yet there have been relatively few attempts to understand the video game as an independent medium. Most such efforts focus on the earliest generation of text-based adventures (Zork, for example) and have little to say about such visually and conceptually sophisticated games as Final Fantasy X, Shenmue, Grand Theft Auto, Halo, and The Sims, in which players inhabit elaborately detailed worlds and manipulate digital avatars with a vast—and in some cases, almost unlimited—array of actions and choices. In Gaming, Alexander Galloway instead considers the video game as a distinct cultural form that demands a new and unique interpretive framework. Drawing on a wide range of disciplines, particularly critical theory and media studies, he analyzes video games as something to be played rather than as texts to be read, and traces in five concise chapters how the “algorithmic culture” created by video games intersects with theories of visuality, realism, allegory, and the avant-garde. If photographs are images and films are moving images, then, Galloway asserts, video games are best defined as actions. Using examples from more than fifty video games, Galloway constructs a classification system of action in video games, incorporating standard elements of gameplay as well as software crashes, network lags, and the use of cheats and game hacks. In subsequent chapters, he explores the overlap between the conventions of film and video games, the political and cultural implications of gaming practices, the visual environment of video games, and the status of games as an emerging cultural form. Together, these essays offer a new conception of gaming and, more broadly, of electronic culture as a whole, one that celebrates and does not lament the qualities of the digital age. Alexander R. Galloway is assistant professor of culture and communication at New York University and author of Protocol: How Control Exists after Decentralization.

My Avatar My Self

Author: Zach Waggoner
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786454091
Format: PDF, Docs
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With videogames now one of the world’s most popular diversions, the virtual world has increasing psychological influence on real-world players. This book examines the relationships between virtual and non-virtual identity in visual role-playing games. Utilizing James Gee’s theoretical constructs of real-world identity, virtual-world identity, and projective identity, this research shows dynamic, varying and complex relationships between the virtual avatar and the player’s sense of self and makes recommendations of terminology for future identity researchers.

Gameplay Mode

Author: Patrick Crogan
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 1452932700
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Understanding the military logics that created and continue to inform computer games

Pervasive Games

Author: Markus Montola
Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann
ISBN: 0123748534
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Quickly emerging from the fast-paced growth of mobile communications and wireless technologies, pervasive games take gaming away from the computer screen and back to the three-dimensional world. Now games can be designed to be played in public spaces like shopping malls, conferences, museums and other non-traditional game venues. Game designers need to understand how to use the world as a gamespace-and both the challenges and advantages of doing so. This book shows how to change the face of play-who plays, when and where they play and what that play means to all involved. The authors explore aspects of pervasive games that concern game designers: what makes these games compelling, what makes them possible today and how they are made. For game researchers, it provides a solid theoretical, philosophical and aesthetic understanding of the genre. Pervasive Games covers everything from theory and design to history and marketing.