Flexible Learning in Action

Author: Hudson, Rachel
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135366942
Format: PDF, ePub
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First Published in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Developing Effective Part time Teachers in Higher Education

Author: Fran Beaton
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0415517087
Format: PDF, Docs
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Part-time teachers have become an increasing part of the workforce in universities throughout the world. They work in a sector undergoing enormous change and debate about the purposes of the university for individuals, societies and economies. As part-time employees, however, they are not necessarily offered the same level of support or recognition as full-time lecturers. This book, drawing on the voices of part-time teachers and the expertise of those who support them, considers whole-institution strategies to promote individual and collective professional development. Utilising real action research undertaken by expert practitioners from Australia, New Zealand and the UK, this book explains: What motivates part-time teachers; Developing effective policy and practice to support part-time teachers; What part-time teachers' voices tell us about the content and delivery of induction programmes and ongoing support; The implications of change and future directions of Higher Education and part-time educators; How to build sustainable frameworks for the professional development of part-time staff. Developing Effective Part-time Teachers in Higher Education explores the extent to which part-time staff are utilised, the effectiveness of their teaching, their integration into the broader teaching environment, and their training and development. This international text will prove an invaluable source for anyone involved in academic and educational staff development in Higher or Further Education, and is essential reading for Human Resources directors and managers, senior academics and all part-time teachers.

Understanding Undergraduates

Author: Celia Popovic
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136725423
Format: PDF, Docs
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Most university teachers have ideas about the typical good or not-so-good student in their classes, but rarely do they share these thoughts with others. By keeping quiet about the preconceptions – or stereotypes – they harbour, teachers put themselves at risk of missing key evidence to help them revise their beliefs; more importantly, they may fail to notice students in real need of their support and encouragement. In this unique work, the authors explore UK and US university teachers’ beliefs about their students’ performance and reveal which beliefs are well-founded, which are mistaken, which mask other underlying factors, and what they can do about them. So is it true, for instance, that British Asian students find medicine more difficult than their white counterparts, or that American students with sports scholarships take their studies less seriously? Is it the case that students who sit at the front of the lecture hall get better grades than those who sit at the back? By comparing students’ demographic data and their actual performance with their teachers’ expectations, the authors expose a complex picture of multiple factors affecting performance. They also contrast students’ comments about their own study habits with their views on what makes a good learner. For each preconception, they offer clear advice on how university teachers can redesign their courses, introduce new activities and assignments and communicate effective learning strategies that students will be able to put into practice. Finally, the authors explore the ramifications of teachers’ beliefs and suggest actions that can be taken at the level of the institution, department or programme and in educational development events, designed to level the playing field so that students have a more equitable chance of success. Ideal for both educational developers and university teachers, this book: reveals general tendencies and findings that will inform developers’ own work with university teachers, provides practical guidance and solutions for university teachers to be able to identify and address students’ actual – rather than assumed – needs, explores means of addressing and challenging people’s natural tendency to rely on preconceived ideas and stereotypes, and explains an action research method that educational developers can use on their own campuses to unravel some of the local preconceptions that may be hampering student success.

Universit t in Zeiten von Bologna

Author: Brigitte Kossek
Publisher: V&R unipress GmbH
ISBN: 3847100378
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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From the establishment of the standard European Higher Education Area in the late 1990s until today, polyphonic discourses have accompanied universities in the age of Bologna reform. This anthology provides thorough analyses of seemingly natural university structures and illustrates ways in which teaching and learning cultures in the age of Bologna can be made constructive, innovative and practice-oriented. The focus is thereby on the ambitious realisation of the principle of standardized research and teaching as well as the principles of student-centred teaching and learning. The contributions of the authors - researchers and teachers at different European universities (Austria, Germany, Switzerland, United Kingdom) - are based on the Friday lectures held at the University of Vienna. Responses by academics, teachers and students at the University of Vienna complement the contributions, critically reviewing the relevance of the contributions for teaching and studying from a practical perspective. With contributions by Ronald Barnett, Reinhard Brandt, Hans Pechar, Otto Kruse, Karin Reiber, Florian H. Muller, Gabi Reinmann, Jon Nixon, Ruth Becker, Leah Carola Czollek, Gudrun Perko, Wolfgang Nowak, Lee Harvey, Dietmar Chur and Celia Whitchurch.