For the Love of Texas

Author: Betsy Christian
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1625846150
Format: PDF, ePub
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Before Texas was a state in the United States, it was a state of Mexico called Coahuila y Tejas. Texans then--like Texans today--didn't like being told what to do. So in 1835, the land now known as Texas organized a revolt and fought for freedom from Mexico and for an independent Texas--that's right, Texas was a country But before it could gain independence, for over six months, Mexican troops under Santa Anna battled against the Texas colonists in a bloody war with effects Texans can still find today. Saddle up with Betsy and George Christian for an interactive, fun chapter in Texas history for kids that challenges them to ask questions about the history they're told and the world in which they live..

Friedrichsburg

Author: Friedrich Armand Strubberg
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292742916
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Founded in 1846, Fredericksburg, Texas, was established by German noblemen who enticed thousands of their compatriots to flee their overcrowded homeland with the prospect of free land in a place that was portrayed as a new Garden of Eden. Few of the settlers, however, were prepared for the harsh realities of the Texas frontier or for confrontation with the Comanche Indians. In his 1867 novel Friedrichsburg, Friedrich Armand Strubberg, a.k.a. Dr. Schubbert, interwove his personal story with a fictional romance to capture the flavor of Fredericksburg, Texas, during its founding years when he served as the first colonial director. Now available in a contemporary translation, Friedrichsburg brings to life the little-known aspects of life among these determined but often ill-equipped settlers who sought to make the transition to a new home and community on the Texas frontier. Opening just as a peace treaty is being negotiated between the German newcomers and the Comanches, the novel describes the unlikely survival of these fledgling homesteads and provides evidence that support from the Delaware Indians, as well as the nearby Mormon community of Zodiac, was key to the Germans’ success. Along the way, Strubberg also depicts the laying of the cornerstone to the Vereinskirche, the blazing of an important new road to Austin, exciting hunting scenes, and an admirable spirit of cultural cohesion and determined resilience. In so doing, he resurrects a fascinating lost world.

Austin s Old Three Hundred

Author: Decendants of Austin's Old Three Hundred
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781571682017
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The Texas Equivalent of the Mayflower adventures, the three hundred families who settled Stephen F. Austin, s original colony formed the foundation on which a republic and then a state was built. In this revised and expanded edition of the book first published in 1991, many stories of those early Texians are told by their decendents.

The Lost Colony of the Confederacy

Author: Eugene C. Harter
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 9781585441020
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The Lost Colony of the Confederacy is the story of a grim, quixotic journey of twenty thousand Confederates to Brazil at the end of the American Civil War. Although it is not known how many Confederates migrated to South America-estimates range from eight thousand to forty thousand-their departure was fueled by bitterness over a lost cause and a distaste for an oppressive victor. Encouraged by Emperor Dom Pedro, most of these exiles settled in Brazil. Although at the time of the Civil War the exodus was widely known and discussed as an indicator of the resentment against the Northern invaders and strict governmental measures, The Lost Colony of the Confederacy is the first book to focus on this mass migration. Eugene Harter vividly describes the lives of these last Confederates who founded their own city and were called Os Confederados. They retained much of their Southernness and lent an American flavor to Brazilian culture. First published in 1985, this work details the background of the exodus and describes the life of the twentiethcentury descendants, who have a strong link both to Southern history and to modern Brazil. The fires have cooled, but it is useful to understand the intense feelings that sparked the migration to Brazil. Southern ways have melded into Brazilian, and both are linked by the unbreakable bonds of history, as shown in this revealing account. The late EUGENE C. HARTER retired from the U.S. Senior Foreign Service and lived in Chestertown, Maryland, until his death in 2010. He was the grandson and greatgrandson of Confederates who left Texas and Mississippi as a part of the great Confederate migration in the late 1860s. Harter is buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

Kentucky Colonization in Texas

Author: Seymour V. Connor
Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com
ISBN: 0806310324
Format: PDF, Docs
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Founded by W. S. Peters and a group of Kentucky businessmen, the Peters Colony provided for the settlement of vast tracts of land in northeastern Texas during the years 1842 to 1848, primarily in the present-day counties of Collin, Cooke, Dallas, Denton, Ellis, Grayson, and Tarrant. The majority of the 2,000 persons who took up land there were from Kentucky and surrounding states.In this publication the author has furnished a history of the Peters Colony as well as a list of the colonists themselves. In this list the genealogist is given full scope for his researches, as each of the 2,000 settlers is positively identified with regard to the following information: name, marital status, occupation, age, year of migration to Texas, county of settlement, state of birth, and state from which he migrated.

Love and Hate in Jamestown

Author: David A. Price
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 030742670X
Format: PDF
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A New York Times Notable Book and aSan Jose Mercury News Top 20 Nonfiction Book of 2003In 1606, approximately 105 British colonists sailed to America, seeking gold and a trade route to the Pacific. Instead, they found disease, hunger, and hostile natives. Ill prepared for such hardship, the men responded with incompetence and infighting; only the leadership of Captain John Smith averted doom for the first permanent English settlement in the New World.The Jamestown colony is one of the great survival stories of American history, and this book brings it fully to life for the first time. Drawing on extensive original documents, David A. Price paints intimate portraits of the major figures from the formidable monarch Chief Powhatan, to the resourceful but unpopular leader John Smith, to the spirited Pocahontas, who twice saved Smith’s life. He also gives a rare balanced view of relations between the settlers and the natives and debunks popular myths about the colony. This is a superb work of history, reminding us of the horrors and heroism that marked the dawning of our nation. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Freedom Colonies

Author: Thad Sitton
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292777811
Format: PDF, ePub
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In the decades following the Civil War, nearly a quarter of African Americans achieved a remarkable victory—they got their own land. While other ex-slaves and many poor whites became trapped in the exploitative sharecropping system, these independence-seeking individuals settled on pockets of unclaimed land that had been deemed too poor for farming and turned them into successful family farms. In these self-sufficient rural communities, often known as "freedom colonies," African Americans created a refuge from the discrimination and violence that routinely limited the opportunities of blacks in the Jim Crow South. Freedom Colonies is the first book to tell the story of these independent African American settlements. Thad Sitton and James Conrad focus on communities in Texas, where blacks achieved a higher percentage of land ownership than in any other state of the Deep South. The authors draw on a vast reservoir of ex-slave narratives, oral histories, written memoirs, and public records to describe how the freedom colonies formed and to recreate the lifeways of African Americans who made their living by farming or in skilled trades such as milling and blacksmithing. They also uncover the forces that led to the decline of the communities from the 1930s onward, including economic hard times and the greed of whites who found legal and illegal means of taking black-owned land. And they visit some of the remaining communities to discover how their independent way of life endures into the twenty-first century.

Castro s Colony

Author: Bobby D. Weaver
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 9781585445189
Format: PDF, ePub
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In 1842, French banker Henri Castro secured a colonization grant and recruited more than two thousand Europeans to immigrate to Texas and populate his colony. The author describes the empresario system under which this community, now known as Castroville, was formed and considers the life of its founder.