Franklin D Roosevelt and American Foreign Policy 1932 1945

Author: Robert Dallek
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199826667
Format: PDF, Docs
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Since the original publication of this classic book in 1979, Roosevelt's foreign policy has come under attack on three main points: Was Roosevelt responsible for the confrontation with Japan that led to the attack at Pearl Harbor? Did Roosevelt "give away" Eastern Europe to Stalin and the U.S.S.R. at Yalta? And, most significantly, did Roosevelt abandon Europe's Jews to the Holocaust, making no direct effort to aid them? In a new Afterword to his definitive history, Dallek vigorously and brilliantly defends Roosevelt's policy. He emphasizes how Roosevelt operated as a master politician in maintaining a national consensus for his foreign policy throughout his presidency and how he brilliantly achieved his policy and military goals.

Peaceful War

Author: Patrick Mendis
Publisher: University Press of America
ISBN: 0761861882
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Peaceful War is an epic narrative of the unfolding drama between the inevitable forces of the “Chinese dream” and the American destiny set in motion by Presidents Barack Obama and Xi Jinping.

Roosevelt s Second Act

Author: Richard Moe
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199981914
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Discusses President Franklin D. Roosevelt's decision to defy one hundred fifty years of tradition and seek a third term in office.

Roosevelt s Road to Russia

Author: George N. Crocker
Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing
ISBN: 1789122813
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Many people will be made angry by this book. They will be angry first at its author for daring to attack the memory of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Then, as they read with an increasing sense of shame this shocking story of the summit conferences of World War II, they will be moved to anger at F.D.R. himself. The trust which the American people bestowed in the leadership of Roosevelt is a matter of historical record. The manner in which the four-times President used that trust is only little by little coming to be realized. The truth is that ever since “victory” was won, western civilization has been at bay, with men everywhere preparing for new wars. What went wrong? Was there a monstrous miscalculation? Bad faith in high places? Incompetence? What really happened at the fateful summit conferences of World War II? The documents, notes, and memoirs of men who were there—at Casablanca, Teheran, and Yalta and the others—how now dredged up the pieces of a horrendous jigsaw puzzle. ROOSEVELT’S ROAD TO RUSSIA, for the first time, puts the pieces together. “Crocker has presented this sad epoch in American history more interestingly and more competently than any previous writer...[he] gives the first complete picture of just how and why we lost the peace...[it] is an important contribution to the history of our times. We are in danger of being deceived by Khrushchev as Roosevelt was deceived by Stalin. Let us read this record as Crocker has faithfully compiled it and heed the warning!”—H. V. Kaltenhorn “A tale of colossal incompetence, monstrous misunderstanding, outrages of freedom...it should be read by everyone who wants to understand the world today.”—The Chicago Tribune “...a scholarly brief with all the logic and persuasion of a grand jury presentation...”—Columbus Dispatch

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Military and Diplomatic History

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN: 0199759251
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The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Military and Diplomatic History, a two-volume set, will offer both assessment and analysis of the key episodes, issues and actors in the military and diplomatic history of the United States. At a time of war, in which ongoing efforts to recalibrate American diplomacy are as imperative as they are perilous, the Oxford Encyclopedia will present itself as the first recourse for scholars wishing to deepen their understanding of the crucial features of the historical and contemporary foreign policy landscape and its perennially martial components. Entries will be written by the top diplomatic and military historians and key scholars of international relations from within the American academy, supplemented, as is appropriate for an encyclopedia of diplomacy, with entries from foreign-based academics, in the United Kingdom and elsewhere. The crucial importance of the subject is reflected in the popularity of university courses dedicated to diplomatic and military history and the enduring appeal of international relations (IR) as a political science discipline drawing on both. The Oxford Encyclopedia will be a basic reference tool across both disciplines - a potentially very significant market.

New Deal Cowboy

Author: Michael Duchemin
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806156708
Format: PDF
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Best known to Americans as the “singing cowboy,” beloved entertainer Gene Autry (1907–1998) appeared in countless films, radio broadcasts, television shows, and other venues. While Autry’s name and a few of his hit songs are still widely known today, his commitment to political causes and public diplomacy deserves greater appreciation. In this innovative examination of Autry’s influence on public opinion, Michael Duchemin explores the various platforms this cowboy crooner used to support important causes, notably Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal and foreign policy initiatives leading up to World War II. As a prolific performer of western folk songs and country-western music, Autry gained popularity in the 1930s by developing a persona that appealed to rural, small-town, and newly urban fans. It was during this same time, Duchemin explains, that Autry threw his support behind the thirty-second president of the United States. Drawing on a wealth of primary sources, Duchemin demonstrates how Autry popularized Roosevelt’s New Deal policies and made them more attractive to the American public. In turn, the president used the emerging motion picture industry as an instrument of public diplomacy to enhance his policy agendas, which Autry’s films, backed by Republic Pictures, unabashedly endorsed. As the United States inched toward entry into World War II, the president’s focus shifted toward foreign policy. Autry responded by promoting Americanism, war preparedness, and friendly relations with Latin America. As a result, Duchemin argues, “Sergeant Gene Autry” played a unique role in making FDR’s internationalist policies more palatable for American citizens reluctant to engage in another foreign war. New Deal Cowboy enhances our understanding of Gene Autry as a western folk hero who, during critical times of economic recovery and international crisis, readily assumed the role of public diplomat, skillfully using his talents to persuade a marginalized populace to embrace a nationalist agenda. By drawing connections between western popular culture and American political history, the book also offers valuable insight concerning the development of leisure and western tourism, the information industry, public diplomacy, and foreign policy in twentieth-century America.

The Banking Crisis of 1933

Author: Susan Estabrook Kennedy
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 0813163307
Format: PDF, Docs
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On March 6, 1933, Franklin D. Roosevelt, less than forty-eight hours after becoming president, ordered the suspension of all banking facilities in the United States. How the nation had reached such a desperate situation and how it responded to the banking "holiday" are examined in this book, the first full-length study of the crisis. Although the 1920s had witnessed a wave of bank failures, the situation worsened after the 1929 stock market crash, and by the winter of 1932-1933, complete banking collapse threatened much of the nation. President Hoover's stopgap measures proved totally inadequate, the author shows, and by March 4, the day of Roosevelt's inauguration, thirty-four states had declared banking moratoriums. Of special interest in this study is Ms. Kennedy's examination of relations between Herbert Hoover and Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Yalta

Author: S. M. Plokhy
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101189924
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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A major new history of the eight days in February 1945 when FDR, Churchill, and Stalin decided the fate of the world Imagine you could eavesdrop on a dinner party with three of the most fascinating historical figures of all time. In this landmark book, a gifted Harvard historian puts you in the room with Churchill, Stalin, and Roosevelt as they meet at a climactic turning point in the war to hash out the terms of the peace. The ink wasn't dry when the recriminations began. The conservatives who hated Roosevelt's New Deal accused him of selling out. Was he too sick? Did he give too much in exchange for Stalin's promise to join the war against Japan? Could he have done better in Eastern Europe? Both Left and Right would blame Yalta for beginning the Cold War. Plokhy's conclusions, based on unprecedented archival research, are surprising. He goes against conventional wisdom-cemented during the Cold War- and argues that an ailing Roosevelt did better than we think. Much has been made of FDR's handling of the Depression; here we see him as wartime chief. Yalta is authoritative, original, vividly- written narrative history, and is sure to appeal to fans of Margaret MacMillan's bestseller Paris 1919.

Black Culture and the New Deal Large Print 16pt

Author: Sklaroff
Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com
ISBN: 1458782328
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In the 1930s, the Roosevelt administration--unwilling to antagonize a powerful southern congressional bloc--refused to endorse legislation that openly sought to improve political, economic, and social conditions for African Americans. Instead, as historian Lauren Rebecca Sklaroff shows, the administration recognized and celebrated African Americans by offering federal support to notable black intellectuals, celebrities, and artists. Sklaroff illustrates how programs within the Federal Arts Projects and several war agencies gave voice to such notable African Americans as Lena Horne, Joe Louis, Duke Ellington, and Richard Wright, as well as lesser-known figures. She argues that these New Deal programs represent a key moment in the history of American race relations, as the cultural arena provided black men and women with unique employment opportunities and new outlets for political expression. Equally important, she contends that these cultural programs were not merely an attempt to appease a black constituency but were also part of the New Deal's larger goal of promoting a multiracial nation. Yet, while federal projects ushered in creativity and unprecedented possibilities, they were also subject to censorship, bigotry, and political machinations. With numerous illustrations, Black Culture and the New Deal offers a fresh perspective on the New Deal's racial progressivism and provides a new framework for understanding black culture and politics in the Roosevelt era.

Apartheid s Reluctant Uncle

Author: Thomas Borstelmann
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0195079426
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Despite the unsavory racism of Malan's government - Borstelmann shows that Pretoria fomented violence among black groups in the late 1940s, just as it has done recently between the ANC and Inkatha - the U.S. saw South Africa as a dependable and important ally. In addition, America was almost completely dependent on southern Africa for its uranium supply, and was willing to go to great lengths to secure the critical fuel for its nuclear arsenal. Borstelmann also notes that race relations in the segregated U.S. played a role in Washington's policies, with few white Americans greatly disturbed by the establishment of apartheid. As South Africa finally nears an end to almost fifty years of formal apartheid (and as Truman nears canonization, following the recent presidential election), Borstelmann's account comes as a startling reminder of America's early links to Pretoria's racist system