Franklin Roosevelt and the Great Constitutional War

Author: Marian Cecilia McKenna
Publisher: Fordham Univ Press
ISBN: 9780823221547
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This new history of Franklin D. Roosevelt and the "Great Constitutional War" is a critical, revisionist portrayal of FDR's personal role in initiating, with the advice of his attorney general, Homer S. Cummings, a "reorganization of the federal judiciary," or what in fact constituted a bald-faced attempt to "pack" the Supreme Court in 1937. No issue in domestic politics ever aroused the country>'s anger as did the presidential proposal to increase the size of the Supreme Court to fifteen by giving the president power to appoint a new judge for every justice over the age of 70 who refused to resign or retire. For background, the case histories which led up to this bold stroke are, for the first time, chronicled and analyzed in a setting that places the stirring events which ensued in their proper perspective. The importance of the book's subject, the thorough documentation, its reasoned and reasonable criticism, all set forth in a lively, but lucid writing style should give this book a popular readership that reaches well beyond academia.

FDR v The Constitution

Author: Burt Solomon
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 9780802719577
Format: PDF, Docs
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In the wake of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's landslide re-election of 1936, the popular president-never anything but self-confident-unaccountably overreached. Deeply frustrated by a Supreme Court that had blocked many of his New Deal initiatives, FDR proposed to enlarge it from 9 justices to 15. The now-famous "court packing scheme" divided Roosevelt's own party and inflamed the country at large, and it failed-humiliatingly for FDR-because the president could persuade neither the public nor the Senate of its virtues. And yet, ironically, he could claim ultimate victory, for the Court that emerged from the revolution of 1937-its majority shifted from conservative to liberal-lasted for the next 68 years, until the recent Bush appointments have tilted it back. Historian Burt Solomon, deeply steeped in Washington's lore, skillfully chronicles one of the great set pieces in American history, illuminating the inner workings of the nation's capital as the three branches of our government squared off. The Supreme Court has generated many fascinating and dramatic stories, but none more so than that of the 168 days during which one of our greatest presidents attempted to outmaneuver the Constitution-an action that inevitably calls forth parallels with the present.

Law as a Means to an End

Author: Brian Z. Tamanaha
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139459228
Format: PDF, Docs
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The contemporary US legal culture is marked by ubiquitous battles among various groups attempting to seize control of the law and wield it against others in pursuit of their particular agenda. This battle takes place in administrative, legislative, and judicial arenas at both the state and federal levels. This book identifies the underlying source of these battles in the spread of the instrumental view of law - the idea that law is purely a means to an end - in a context of sharp disagreement over the social good. It traces the rise of the instrumental view of law in the course of the past two centuries, then demonstrates the pervasiveness of this view of law and its implications within the contemporary legal culture, and ends by showing the various ways in which seeing law in purely instrumental terms threatens to corrode the rule of law.

Unternehmensprivatsph re

Author: Valentin Pfisterer
Publisher: Mohr Siebeck
ISBN: 9783161532085
Format: PDF, Kindle
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English summary: Regulation is all the rage in Europe, and therefore, the European legislature has momentum. It obligates companies to disclose ever more business-derived information. Valentin Pfister investigates, with the comparative view, the situation in the United States of America in which the European constitutional law sets limits on the European legislature. As a result of that constitutional reality, Pfister attempts to measure anew the relationship of obligatory publication of information and the interests of business confidentiality in light of the public/private dichotomy. The author develops a plural concept of the private sphere of business, rooted in the basic law for the respect of private life. This concept provides a potentially effective instrument to constitutionally domesticate the obligatory provision of information and other forms of regulation. German description: Regulierung hat Konjunktur in Europa, der Europaische Gesetzgeber hat Ruckenwind. Er verpflichtet Unternehmen zur Offenlegung von immer mehr unternehmensbezogenen Informationen. Valentin Pfisterer analysiert mit einem vergleichenden Blick auf die Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika, welche Grenzen das Europaische Verfassungsrecht dem Europaischen Gesetzgeber dabei setzt. Hiervon ausgehend unternimmt er den Versuch, das Verhaltnis von Pflichtpublizitat und Vertraulichkeitsinteressen der Unternehmen im Lichte der Dichotomie Offentlichkeit/Privatheit neu zu vermessen. Der Autor entwickelt ein plurales Konzept von Unternehmensprivatsphare, verankert im Grundrecht auf Achtung des Privatlebens. Dieses Konzept bietet sich als ein potentiell wirkungsvolles Instrument an, um die verpflichtende Offenlegung - und andere Formen der Regulierung - verfassungsrechtlich zu domestizieren.

Supreme Power Franklin Roosevelt vs the Supreme Court

Author: Jeff Shesol
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393079418
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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"A stunning work of history."—Doris Kearns Goodwin, author of No Ordinary Time and Team of Rivals Beginning in 1935, the Supreme Court's conservative majority left much of FDR's agenda in ruins. The pillars of the New Deal fell in short succession. It was not just the New Deal but democracy itself that stood on trial. In February 1937, Roosevelt struck back with an audacious plan to expand the Court to fifteen justices—and to "pack" the new seats with liberals who shared his belief in a "living" Constitution.

Wie Demokratien sterben

Author: Steven Levitsky
Publisher: DVA
ISBN: 3641222915
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Ausgezeichnet mit dem NDR Kultur Sachbuchpreis 2018 als bestes Sachbuch des Jahres Demokratien sterben mit einem Knall oder mit einem Wimmern. Der Knall, also das oft gewaltsame Ende einer Demokratie durch einen Putsch, einen Krieg oder eine Revolution, ist spektakulärer. Doch das Dahinsiechen einer Demokratie, das Sterben mit einem Wimmern, ist alltäglicher – und gefährlicher, weil die Bürger meist erst aufwachen, wenn es zu spät ist. Mit Blick auf die USA, Lateinamerika und Europa zeigen die beiden Politologen Steven Levitsky und Daniel Ziblatt, woran wir erkennen, dass demokratische Institutionen und Prozesse ausgehöhlt werden. Und sie sagen, an welchen Punkten wir eingreifen können, um diese Entwicklung zu stoppen. Denn mit gezielter Gegenwehr lässt sich die Demokratie retten – auch vom Sterbebett.

The Supreme Court Reborn

Author: William E. Leuchtenburg
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780198027157
Format: PDF, Kindle
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For almost sixty years, the results of the New Deal have been an accepted part of political life. Social Security, to take one example, is now seen as every American's birthright. But to validate this revolutionary legislation, Franklin Roosevelt had to fight a ferocious battle against the opposition of the Supreme Court--which was entrenched in laissez faire orthodoxy. After many lost battles, Roosevelt won his war with the Court, launching a Constitutional revolution that went far beyond anything he envisioned. In The Supreme Court Reborn, esteemed scholar William E. Leuchtenburg explores the critical episodes of the legal revolution that created the Court we know today. Leuchtenburg deftly portrays the events leading up to Roosevelt's showdown with the Supreme Court. Committed to laissez faire doctrine, the conservative "Four Horsemen"--Justices Butler, Van Devanter, Sutherland, and McReynolds, aided by the swing vote of Justice Owen Roberts--struck down one regulatory law after another, outraging Roosevelt and much of the Depression-stricken nation. Leuchtenburg demonstrates that Roosevelt thought he had the backing of the country as he prepared a scheme to undermine the Four Hoursemen. Famous (or infamous) as the "Court-packing plan," this proposal would have allowed the president to add one new justice for every sitting justice over the age of seventy. The plan picked up considerable momentum in Congress; it was only after a change in the voting of Justice Roberts (called "the switch in time that saved nine") and the death of Senate Majority Leader Joseph T. Robinson that it shuddered to a halt. Rosevelt's persistence led to one of his biggest legislative defeats. Despite the failure of the Court-packing plan, however, the president won his battle with the Supreme Court; one by one, the Four Horsemen left the bench, to be replaced by Roosevelt appointees. Leuchtenburg explores the far-reaching nature of FDR's victory. As a consequence of the Constitutional Revolution that began in 1937, not only was the New Deal upheld (as precedent after precedent was overturned), but also the Court began a dramatic expansion of Civil liberties that would culminate in the Warren Court. Among the surprises was Senator Hugo Black, who faced widespread opposition for his lack of qualifications when he was appointed as associate justice; shortly afterward, a reporter revealed that he had been a member of the Ku Klux Klan. Despite that background, Black became an articulate spokesman for individual liberty. William E. Leuchtenburg is one of America's premier historians, a scholar who combines depth of learning with a graceful style. This superbly crafted book sheds new light on the great Constitutional crisis of our century, illuminating the legal and political battles that created today's Supreme Court.

Landmark Debates in Congress

Author: Stephen W. Stathis
Publisher: CQ Press
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Docs
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Examines more than fifty significant congressional debates, arranged in chronological order and accompanied by introductory essays that outline the opposing forces and historical context of each debate.