From Savage to Negro

Author: Lee D. Baker
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520211681
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Explores ways in which anthropologists shaped racial politics in the United States, examining interactions between African-American intellectuals and such white anthropologists as Franz Boas, Frederic Ward Putnam, and Daniel G. Brinton.

From Savage to Negro

Author: Lee D. Baker
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520920198
Format: PDF, ePub
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Lee D. Baker explores what racial categories mean to the American public and how these meanings are reinforced by anthropology, popular culture, and the law. Focusing on the period between two landmark Supreme Court decisions—Plessy v. Ferguson (the so-called "separate but equal" doctrine established in 1896) and Brown v. Board of Education (the public school desegregation decision of 1954)—Baker shows how racial categories change over time. Baker paints a vivid picture of the relationships between specific African American and white scholars, who orchestrated a paradigm shift within the social sciences from ideas based on Social Darwinism to those based on cultural relativism. He demonstrates that the greatest impact on the way the law codifies racial differences has been made by organizations such as the NAACP, which skillfully appropriated the new social science to exploit the politics of the Cold War.

From Savage to Negro

Author: Lee D. Baker
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520211677
Format: PDF
Download Now
Explores ways in which anthropologists shaped racial politics in the United States, examining interactions between African-American intellectuals and such white anthropologists as Franz Boas, Frederic Ward Putnam, and Daniel G. Brinton.

Anthropology and the Racial Politics of Culture

Author: Lee D. Baker
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822392690
Format: PDF
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In the late nineteenth century, if ethnologists in the United States recognized African American culture, they often perceived it as something to be overcome and left behind. At the same time, they were committed to salvaging “disappearing” Native American culture by curating objects, narrating practices, and recording languages. In Anthropology and the Racial Politics of Culture, Lee D. Baker examines theories of race and culture developed by American anthropologists during the late nineteenth century and early twentieth. He investigates the role that ethnologists played in creating a racial politics of culture in which Indians had a culture worthy of preservation and exhibition while African Americans did not. Baker argues that the concept of culture developed by ethnologists to understand American Indian languages and customs in the nineteenth century formed the basis of the anthropological concept of race eventually used to confront “the Negro problem” in the twentieth century. As he explores the implications of anthropology’s different approaches to African Americans and Native Americans, and the field’s different but overlapping theories of race and culture, Baker delves into the careers of prominent anthropologists and ethnologists, including James Mooney Jr., Frederic W. Putnam, Daniel G. Brinton, and Franz Boas. His analysis takes into account not only scientific societies, journals, museums, and universities, but also the development of sociology in the United States, African American and Native American activists and intellectuals, philanthropy, the media, and government entities from the Bureau of Indian Affairs to the Supreme Court. In Anthropology and the Racial Politics of Culture, Baker tells how anthropology has both responded to and helped shape ideas about race and culture in the United States, and how its ideas have been appropriated (and misappropriated) to wildly different ends.

Outsider Within

Author: Faye Venetia Harrison
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252074904
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Envisioning new directions for an inclusive anthropology

Life in America

Author: Lee Baker
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
ISBN: 9781405105644
Format: PDF, ePub
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Life in America: Identity and Everyday Experience is a fascinating collection of readings that explores how people negotiate identity in the United States today. Brings together readings that provide a thoroughly engaging and fascinating look at central issues of identity and what it means to be American. Explores the tension between identity and identification to help readers begin to understand how people creatively confront the perks and perils of identity in the United States. Offers a look at a wide range of subjects including: violence and video games, queer pilgrimages to San Francisco, Filipina critiques of "sleeping around," and the significance of "lowriders" in Hispano/Chicano culture.

Nigger Heaven

Author: Carl Van Vechten
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252068607
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Here upper-class elites discuss art in well-appointed drawing rooms; rowdy and lascivious drunks spend long nights in jazz clubs and speakeasies; and politically conscious young intellectuals drink coffee and debate "the race problem" in walkup apartments. At the center of the story, two young people - a quiet, serious librarian and a volatile aspiring writer - struggle to love each other as their dreams are slowly suffocated by racism.

Virginia Hasn t Always Been for Lovers

Author: Phyl Newbeck
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 9780809328574
Format: PDF
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Explores the history of the laws banning interracial marriage in the United States, discussing how they came about, how they were perpetuated, and how they were struck down, with an emphasis on the case of Richard and Mildred Loving, a couple convicted for the crime of marrying across racial lines by the state of Virginia in the late 1950s.

Black Americans in the Roosevelt Era

Author: John B. Kirby
Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press
ISBN: 9780870493492
Format: PDF
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This original and vital study enriches our understanding of the New Deal, the African American experience, and liberal reform.

Race

Author: Peter Wade
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316351971
Format: PDF, Docs
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Taking a comparative approach, this textbook is a concise introduction to race. Illustrated with detailed examples from around the world, it is organised into two parts. Part I explores the historical changes in ideas about race from the ancient world to the present day, in different corners of the globe. Part II outlines ways in which racial difference and inequality are perceived and enacted in selected regions of the world. Examining how humans have used ideas of physical appearance, heredity and behaviour as criteria for categorising others, the text guides students through provocative questions such as: what is race? Does studying race reinforce racism? Does a colour-blind approach dismantle, or merely mask, racism? How does biology feed into concepts of race? Numerous case studies, photos, figures and tables help students to appreciate the different meanings of race in varied contexts, and end-of-chapter research tasks provide further support for student learning.