From Savage to Negro

Author: Lee D. Baker
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520211681
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Explores ways in which anthropologists shaped racial politics in the United States, examining interactions between African-American intellectuals and such white anthropologists as Franz Boas, Frederic Ward Putnam, and Daniel G. Brinton.

From Savage to Negro

Author: Lee D. Baker
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520920198
Format: PDF, Docs
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Lee D. Baker explores what racial categories mean to the American public and how these meanings are reinforced by anthropology, popular culture, and the law. Focusing on the period between two landmark Supreme Court decisions—Plessy v. Ferguson (the so-called "separate but equal" doctrine established in 1896) and Brown v. Board of Education (the public school desegregation decision of 1954)—Baker shows how racial categories change over time. Baker paints a vivid picture of the relationships between specific African American and white scholars, who orchestrated a paradigm shift within the social sciences from ideas based on Social Darwinism to those based on cultural relativism. He demonstrates that the greatest impact on the way the law codifies racial differences has been made by organizations such as the NAACP, which skillfully appropriated the new social science to exploit the politics of the Cold War.

From Savage to Negro

Author: Lee D. Baker
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520211677
Format: PDF, Docs
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Explores ways in which anthropologists shaped racial politics in the United States, examining interactions between African-American intellectuals and such white anthropologists as Franz Boas, Frederic Ward Putnam, and Daniel G. Brinton.

Anthropology and the Racial Politics of Culture

Author: Lee D. Baker
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822392690
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In the late nineteenth century, if ethnologists in the United States recognized African American culture, they often perceived it as something to be overcome and left behind. At the same time, they were committed to salvaging “disappearing” Native American culture by curating objects, narrating practices, and recording languages. In Anthropology and the Racial Politics of Culture, Lee D. Baker examines theories of race and culture developed by American anthropologists during the late nineteenth century and early twentieth. He investigates the role that ethnologists played in creating a racial politics of culture in which Indians had a culture worthy of preservation and exhibition while African Americans did not. Baker argues that the concept of culture developed by ethnologists to understand American Indian languages and customs in the nineteenth century formed the basis of the anthropological concept of race eventually used to confront “the Negro problem” in the twentieth century. As he explores the implications of anthropology’s different approaches to African Americans and Native Americans, and the field’s different but overlapping theories of race and culture, Baker delves into the careers of prominent anthropologists and ethnologists, including James Mooney Jr., Frederic W. Putnam, Daniel G. Brinton, and Franz Boas. His analysis takes into account not only scientific societies, journals, museums, and universities, but also the development of sociology in the United States, African American and Native American activists and intellectuals, philanthropy, the media, and government entities from the Bureau of Indian Affairs to the Supreme Court. In Anthropology and the Racial Politics of Culture, Baker tells how anthropology has both responded to and helped shape ideas about race and culture in the United States, and how its ideas have been appropriated (and misappropriated) to wildly different ends.

Resisting Racism and Xenophobia

Author: Faye Venetia Harrison
Publisher: Rowman Altamira
ISBN: 9780759104822
Format: PDF
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Harrison's collection of essays focuses on the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, class, and (ethno)nation that influence the dynamics of human rights conflicts in different parts of the world. The authors investigate human rights conflicts in Europe, the Americas, Asia, Africa, and Australia, and reflect upon the political concerns and anxieties that have taken center stage since the catastrophe of 9/11. The contributors are an internationally diverse group of anthropologists and human rights activists concerned with global culturally diverse gendered experiences. This book will be valuable to instructors and applied professionals in anthropology, gender studies, ethnic studies, and international human rights.

African American Pioneers in Anthropology

Author: Ira E. Harrison
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252067365
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This pathbreaking collection of intellectual biographies is the first to probe the careers of thirteen early African-American anthropologists, detailing both their achievements and their struggle with the latent and sometimes blatant racism of the times. Invaluable to historians of anthropology, this collection will also be useful to readers interested in African-American studies and biography.

Culture power history

Author: Nicholas B. Dirks
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691021027
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Organized around these three concepts, Culture/ Power/History brings together both classic and new essays that address Foucault's "new economy of power relations" in a number of different, contestatory directions. Representing innovative work from various disciplines and sites of study, from taxidermy to Madonna, the book seeks to affirm the creative possibilities available in a time marked by growing uncertainty about established disciplinary forms of knowledge and by the increasing fluidity of the boundaries between them. The book is introduced by a major synthetic essay by the editors, which calls attention to the most significant issues enlivening theoretical discourse today. The editors seek not only to encourage scholars to reflect anew on the course of social theory, but also to orient newcomers to this area of inquiry.

Picturing Culture

Author: Jay Ruby
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226730998
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Here, Jay Ruby—a founder of visual anthropology—distills his thirty-year exploration of the relationship of film and anthropology. Spurred by a conviction that the ideal of an anthropological cinema has not even remotely begun to be realized, Ruby argues that ethnographic filmmakers should generate a set of critical standards analogous to those for written ethnographies. Cinematic artistry and the desire to entertain, he argues, can eclipse the original intention, which is to provide an anthropological representation of the subjects. The book begins with analyses of key filmmakers (Robert Flaherty, Robert Garner, and Tim Asch) who have striven to generate profound statements about human behavior on film. Ruby then discusses the idea of research film, Eric Michaels and indigenous media, the ethics of representation, the nature of ethnography, anthropological knowledge, and film and lays the groundwork for a critical approach to the field that borrows selectively from film, communication, media, and cultural studies. Witty and original, yet intensely theoretical, this collection is a major contribution to the field of visual anthropology.

Outsider Within

Author: Faye Venetia Harrison
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252074904
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Envisioning new directions for an inclusive anthropology

Unspeak

Author: Steven Poole
Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
ISBN: 1555848729
Format: PDF, Docs
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What do the phrases “pro-life,” “intelligent design,” and “the war on terror” have in common? Each of them is a name for something that smuggles in a highly charged political opinion. Words and phrases that function in this special way go by many names. Some writers call them “evaluative-descriptive terms.” Others talk of “terministic screens” or discuss the way debates are “framed.” Author Steven Poole calls them Unspeak. Unspeak represents an attempt by politicians, interest groups, and business corporations to say something without saying it, without getting into an argument and so having to justify itself. At the same time, it tries to unspeak — in the sense of erasing or silencing — any possible opposing point of view by laying a claim right at the start to only one way of looking at a problem. Recalling the vocabulary of George Orwell’s 1984, as an Unspeak phrase becomes a widely used term of public debate, it saturates the mind with one viewpoint while simultaneously makes an opposing view ever more difficult to enunciate. In this fascinating book, Poole traces modern Unspeak and reveals how the evolution of language changes the way we think.