From Tribute to Communal Sovereignty

Author: Andrew Roth-Seneff
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 0816535493
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From Tribute to Communal Sovereignty examines both continuity and change over the last five centuries for the indigenous peoples of central western Mexico, providing the first sweeping and comprehensive history of this important region in Mesoamerica. The continuities elucidated concern ancestral territorial claims that date back centuries and reflect the stable geographic locations occupied by core populations of indigenous language–speakers in or near their pre-Columbian territories since the Postclassical period, from the thirteenth to late fifteenth centuries. A common theme of this volume is the strong cohesive forces present, not only in the colonial construction of Christian village communities in Purhépecha and Nahuatl groups in Michoacán but also in the demographically less inclusive Huichol (Wixarika), Cora, and Tepehuan groups, whose territories were more extensive. The authors review a cluster of related themes: settlement patterns of the last five centuries in central western Mexico, language distribution, ritual representation of territoriality, processes of collective identity, and the forms of participation and resistance during different phases of Mexican state formation. From such research, the question arises: does the village community constitute a unique level of organization of the experience of the original peoples of central western Mexico? The chapters address this question in rich and complex ways by first focusing on the past configurations and changes in lifeways during the transition from pre-Columbian to Spanish rule in tributary empires, then examining the long-term postcolonial process of Mexican independence that introduced the emerging theme of the communal sovereignty.

Recovering History Constructing Race

Author: Martha Menchaca
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292778481
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The history of Mexican Americans is a history of the intermingling of races—Indian, White, and Black. This racial history underlies a legacy of racial discrimination against Mexican Americans and their Mexican ancestors that stretches from the Spanish conquest to current battles over ending affirmative action and other assistance programs for ethnic minorities. Asserting the centrality of race in Mexican American history, Martha Menchaca here offers the first interpretive racial history of Mexican Americans, focusing on racial foundations and race relations from prehispanic times to the present. Menchaca uses the concept of racialization to describe the process through which Spanish, Mexican, and U.S. authorities constructed racial status hierarchies that marginalized Mexicans of color and restricted their rights of land ownership. She traces this process from the Spanish colonial period and the introduction of slavery through racial laws affecting Mexican Americans into the late twentieth-century. This re-viewing of familiar history through the lens of race recovers Blacks as important historical actors, links Indians and the mission system in the Southwest to the Mexican American present, and reveals the legal and illegal means by which Mexican Americans lost their land grants.

Encyclopedia of Stateless Nations

Author: James B. Minahan
Publisher: Greenwood
ISBN: 9781610699532
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book addresses the numerous national movements of ethnic groups around the world seeking independence, more self-rule, or autonomy—movements that have proliferated exponentially in the 21st century.

Not by Faith Alone

Author: Julie Adkins
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739146580
Format: PDF, Docs
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"Any person who wants to understand how faith-based organizations provide care for needy people in America must read this book. Based on a large set of case studies written by authors from various disciplines, Not by Faith A/one presents the full picture of how faith-based organizations act as a substitute for public care in America. The editors provide an insightful introduction that helps us understand the dynamics of local care by organizations of various faith traditions."ùRam A. Cnaan, University of Pennsylvania "Not by Faith Atone demonstrates that faith-based organizations (FBOs) play a major role in contemporary American life, from California to New England, from the Dakotas to the Texas border. The authors address a broad range of significant and controversial social and economic issuesùcommunity services, community development, education, homelessness assistance, refugee services, and drug addiction/rehabilitation programs. The volume's chapters emphasize an anthropological and ethnographic approach to FBOs while showing awareness of the contributions from other disciplines. Especially valuable is the editors' introduction, in which they offer an excellent history of 'faithful service' in America in light of several typologies for understanding the diversity of FBOs in the United States and abroad. This volume will be of great value to scholars and to practitioners and will serve as a landmark collection for appreciating the important role of faith-based organizations in American society."ùRobert V. Kemper, Southern Methodist University This edited collection provides an in-depth ethnographic study of faith-based development organizations in the United States, shining a much-needed critical light onto these organizations and their role by exploring the varied ways that faith-based organizations attempt to mend the fissures and mitigate the effects of neoliberal capitalism, poverty, and the social service sector on the poor and powerless. In doing so, Not by Faith A/one generates provocative and sophisticated analyses grounded in empirical case studies of such topics as the meaning of "faith-based" development, evaluations of faith-based versus secular approaches, the influence of faith orientation on program formulation and delivery, and examinations of faith-based organizations' impacts on structural inequality and poverty alleviation. Taken together, the chapters in this book demonstrate the vital importance of ethnography for understanding the particular role of faith-based agencies in development. The contributors demonstrate the importance of grounded analysis of the specific discourses, practices, and beliefs that imbue faith-based development with such power and reveal both the promise and the limitations of this particular vehicle of service delivery. Julie Adkins is adjunct lecturer in the Department of Anthropology and the Perkins School of Theology at Southern Methodist University. Laurie Occhipinti is associate professor in the Department of Anthropology, Geography, and Earth Sciences at Clarion University. Tara Herreran is visiting assistant professor in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work at Central Michigan University.

Bridging the Gaps

Author: Tara Hefferan
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 9780739132876
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This edited collection provides an in-depth study of faith-based development organizations in Latin America and the Caribbean. With both analytical rigor and ethnographic awareness, the essays explore faith-based organizations as a possible model for economic development.

Another Jerusalem

Author: José-Juan López-Portillo
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004341455
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Part I. New Spain's original sin -- Tlatocayotl and Hidalguia -- Original sin: -- Part II. Courtly government -- Viceroys and magnates -- Republic of Spaniards -- Republic of Indios -- Part III. "Another Jerusalem" -- Political ideals -- Constructing New Spain

Radical Territories in the Brazilian Amazon

Author: Laura Zanotti
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 0816533547
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Radical territories in the Brazilian Amazon sheds light on the creative and groundbreaking efforts Kayapao peoples deploy to protect their lands and livelihoods in Brazil.

Professional Lives Personal Struggles

Author: Randall Amster
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739174290
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This is the first book published that specifically examines questions of ethics and advocacy that arise in conducting research on homelessness, exploring the issues through the deeply personal experiences of some of the field’s leading scholars. By examining the central queries from a broad range of perspectives, the authors presented here draw upon years of rich investigations to generate a framework that will be instructive for researchers across a wide spectrum of areas of inquiry.

Deadly Desires

Author: Julie Lokis-Adkins
Publisher: Karnac Books
ISBN: 1781812241
Format: PDF, Mobi
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During the fin-de-siecle, stories about hysterical women filled the air of Paris and the novels emerging during this era conveyed this hysteria and openly portrayed the symptoms of the women being treated at the Salpetiere. This book examines the emergence of hysterical discourse and its influence on women's writing, specifically focusing on the presentation of female sexuality in three different narratives.

Transatlantic Voices

Author: Elvira Pulitano
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803256453
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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A collection of critical essays by European scholars on contemporary Native North American literatures. Devoted to the primary genres of Native literature - fiction, nonfiction, drama, poetry - these essays chart the course of theories of Native literature, and delineate the crosscurrents in the history of Native literature studies.