Geocomplexity and the Physics of Earthquakes

Author: John Rundle
Publisher: American Geophysical Union
ISBN: 0875909787
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Published by the American Geophysical Union as part of the Geophysical Monograph Series, Volume 120. Earthquakes in urban centers are capable of causing enormous damage. The January 16, 1995 Kobe, Japan earthquake was only a magnitude 6.9 event and yet produced an estimated $200 billion loss. Despite an active earthquake prediction program in Japan, this event was a complete surprise. Similar scenarios are possible in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, and other urban centers around the Pacific plate boundary. The development of forecast or prediction methodologies for these great damaging earthquakes has been complicated by the fact that the largest events repeat at irregular intervals of hundreds to thousands of years, resulting in a limited historical record that has frustrated phenomenological studies. The papers in this book describe an emerging alternative approach, which is based on a new understanding of earthquake physics arising from the construction and analysis of numerical simulations. With these numerical simulations, earthquake physics now can be investigated in numerical laboratories. Simulation data from numerical experiments can be used to develop theoretical understanding that can be subsequently applied to observed data. These methods have been enabled by the information technology revolution, in which fundamental advances in computing and communications are placing vast computational resources at our disposal.

Geocomplexity and the Physics of Earthquakes

Author: John Rundle
Publisher: American Geophysical Union
ISBN: 0875909787
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
Published by the American Geophysical Union as part of the Geophysical Monograph Series, Volume 120. Earthquakes in urban centers are capable of causing enormous damage. The January 16, 1995 Kobe, Japan earthquake was only a magnitude 6.9 event and yet produced an estimated $200 billion loss. Despite an active earthquake prediction program in Japan, this event was a complete surprise. Similar scenarios are possible in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, and other urban centers around the Pacific plate boundary. The development of forecast or prediction methodologies for these great damaging earthquakes has been complicated by the fact that the largest events repeat at irregular intervals of hundreds to thousands of years, resulting in a limited historical record that has frustrated phenomenological studies. The papers in this book describe an emerging alternative approach, which is based on a new understanding of earthquake physics arising from the construction and analysis of numerical simulations. With these numerical simulations, earthquake physics now can be investigated in numerical laboratories. Simulation data from numerical experiments can be used to develop theoretical understanding that can be subsequently applied to observed data. These methods have been enabled by the information technology revolution, in which fundamental advances in computing and communications are placing vast computational resources at our disposal.

Computational Earthquake Physics Simulations Analysis and Infrastructure

Author: Xiang-chu Yin
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 3764381310
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This second part of a two-volume work contains 22 research articles on various aspects of computational earthquake physics. Coverage includes the promising earthquake forecasting model LURR (Load-Unload Response Ratio); pattern informatics and phase dynamics and their applications; computational algorithms, including continuum damage models and visualization and analysis of geophysical datasets; and assimilation of data.

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN: 1119325838
Format: PDF, ePub
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Earthquakes

Author: Rachel Abercrombie
Publisher: American Geophysical Union
ISBN: 9780875904351
Format: PDF, ePub
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Published by the American Geophysical Union as part of the Geophysical Monograph Series. Earthquakes, from the smallest to the largest, release elastic strain energy. Where does this energy go? How much is radiated and how much is expended in other source processes, such as overcoming fault friction? Do large and small earthquakes differ with regard to rupture physics? This book examines such questions and current debates from five vantage points: How we measure earthquake energy Effects of earthquake size and tectonic setting Insights from numerical simulations Geological fault zone research The efficiency of the "earthquake machine" in terms of fault rupture, friction, and seismic phenomena Earthquakes: Radiated Energy and the Physics of Faulting is the first book to present a systematic approach to understanding the energy changes associated with earthquakes. Solid Earth scientists, researchers and students-especially those who work in seismology, tectonophysics, rock mechanics and geodesy-will find this book an essential resource, now and into the future.