Government Schools and the Law

Author: Paul Meredith
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113495882X
Format: PDF, Docs
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First published in 1992. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

School Law

Author: Lexisnexis
Publisher: Lexis Nexis Matthew Bender
ISBN: 9781422467992
Format: PDF
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The Color of Law A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America

Author: Richard Rothstein
Publisher: Liveright Publishing
ISBN: 1631492861
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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"Rothstein has presented what I consider to be the most forceful argument ever published on how federal, state, and local governments gave rise to and reinforced neighborhood segregation." —William Julius Wilson In this groundbreaking history of the modern American metropolis, Richard Rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, explodes the myth that America’s cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation—that is, through individual prejudices, income differences, or the actions of private institutions like banks and real estate agencies. Rather, The Color of Law incontrovertibly makes clear that it was de jure segregation—the laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal governments—that actually promoted the discriminatory patterns that continue to this day. Through extraordinary revelations and extensive research that Ta-Nehisi Coates has lauded as "brilliant" (The Atlantic), Rothstein comes to chronicle nothing less than an untold story that begins in the 1920s, showing how this process of de jure segregation began with explicit racial zoning, as millions of African Americans moved in a great historical migration from the south to the north. As Jane Jacobs established in her classic The Death and Life of Great American Cities, it was the deeply flawed urban planning of the 1950s that created many of the impoverished neighborhoods we know. Now, Rothstein expands our understanding of this history, showing how government policies led to the creation of officially segregated public housing and the demolition of previously integrated neighborhoods. While urban areas rapidly deteriorated, the great American suburbanization of the post–World War II years was spurred on by federal subsidies for builders on the condition that no homes be sold to African Americans. Finally, Rothstein shows how police and prosecutors brutally upheld these standards by supporting violent resistance to black families in white neighborhoods. The Fair Housing Act of 1968 prohibited future discrimination but did nothing to reverse residential patterns that had become deeply embedded. Yet recent outbursts of violence in cities like Baltimore, Ferguson, and Minneapolis show us precisely how the legacy of these earlier eras contributes to persistent racial unrest. “The American landscape will never look the same to readers of this important book” (Sherrilyn Ifill, president of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund), as Rothstein’s invaluable examination shows that only by relearning this history can we finally pave the way for the nation to remedy its unconstitutional past.

Failing Law Schools

Author: Brian Z. Tamanaha
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226923622
Format: PDF, Kindle
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On the surface, law schools today are thriving. Enrollments are on the rise, and their resources are often the envy of every other university department. Law professors are among the highest paid and play key roles as public intellectuals, advisers, and government officials. Yet behind the flourishing facade, law schools are failing abjectly. Recent front-page stories have detailed widespread dubious practices, including false reporting of LSAT and GPA scores, misleading placement reports, and the fundamental failure to prepare graduates to enter the profession. Addressing all these problems and more in a ringing critique is renowned legal scholar Brian Z. Tamanaha. Piece by piece, Tamanaha lays out the how and why of the crisis and the likely consequences if the current trend continues. The out-of-pocket cost of obtaining a law degree at many schools now approaches $200,000. The average law school graduate’s debt is around $100,000—the highest it has ever been—while the legal job market is the worst in decades, with the scarce jobs offering starting salaries well below what is needed to handle such a debt load. At the heart of the problem, Tamanaha argues, are the economic demands and competitive pressures on law schools—driven by competition over U.S. News and World Report ranking. When paired with a lack of regulatory oversight, the work environment of professors, the limited information available to prospective students, and loan-based tuition financing, the result is a system that is fundamentally unsustainable. Growing concern with the crisis in legal education has led to high-profile coverage in the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times, and many observers expect it soon will be the focus of congressional scrutiny. Bringing to the table his years of experience from within the legal academy, Tamanaha has provided the perfect resource for assessing what’s wrong with law schools and figuring out how to fix them.

The Law

Author: Frederic Bastiat
Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.
ISBN: 1596059648
Format: PDF, Mobi
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French political libertarian and economist CLAUDE FRDRIC BASTIAT (1801-1850) was one of the most eloquent champions of the concept that property rights and individual freedoms flowed from natural law. Here, in this 1850 classic, a powerful refutation of Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto, published two years earlier, Bastiat discusses: . what is law? . why socialism constitutes legal plunder . the proper function of the law . the law and morality . "the vicious circle of socialism" . the basis for stable government . and more.

The Schoolhouse Gate

Author: Justin Driver
Publisher: Pantheon
ISBN: 1101871660
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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An award-winning constitutional law scholar at the University of Chicago (who clerked for Judge Merrick B. Garland, Justice Stephen Breyer, and Justice Sandra Day O’Connor) gives us an engaging and alarming book that aims to vindicate the rights of public school stu­dents, which have so often been undermined by the Supreme Court in recent decades. Judicial decisions assessing the constitutional rights of students in the nation’s public schools have consistently generated bitter controversy. From racial segregation to un­authorized immigration, from antiwar protests to compul­sory flag salutes, from economic inequality to teacher-led prayer—these are but a few of the cultural anxieties dividing American society that the Supreme Court has addressed in elementary and secondary schools. The Schoolhouse Gate gives a fresh, lucid, and provocative account of the historic legal battles waged over education and illuminates contemporary disputes that continue to fracture the nation. Justin Driver maintains that since the 1970s the Supreme Court has regularly abdicated its responsibility for protecting students’ constitutional rights and risked trans­forming public schools into Constitution-free zones. Students deriving lessons about citizenship from the Court’s decisions in recent decades would conclude that the following actions taken by educators pass constitutional muster: inflicting severe corporal punishment on students without any proce­dural protections, searching students and their possessions without probable cause in bids to uncover violations of school rules, random drug testing of students who are not suspected of wrongdoing, and suppressing student speech for the view­point it espouses. Taking their cue from such decisions, lower courts have upheld a wide array of dubious school actions, including degrading strip searches, repressive dress codes, draconian “zero tolerance” disciplinary policies, and severe restrictions on off-campus speech. Driver surveys this legal landscape with eloquence, highlights the gripping personal narratives behind landmark clashes, and warns that the repeated failure to honor students’ rights threatens our basic constitutional order. This magiste­rial book will make it impossible to view American schools—or America itself—in the same way again.

Maryland School Law Deskbook

Author: Edmund J. O'Meally
Publisher: LexisNexis
ISBN: 1522140212
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Maryland School Law Deskbook is a concise and accessible guide written by experienced education law attorneys, and published in cooperation with the Maryland Association of Boards of Education (MABE). It offers current and authoritative information on legal issues facing schools within the context of state and federal education law. This is the essential desk reference for school administrators, school board members, superintendents, education professionals, and attorneys. The Deskbook includes 16 chapters on key topics such as: • Local School Board Roles and Responsibilities • State Role in Education • Federal Role in Education • Budget and Finance • School Facilities, Student Transportation, and Health and Safety • Employee Relations and Rights • Employee Discipline and Dismissal • No Child Left Behind Act • Tort, Liability and Insurance Issues • Student Attendance, Instruction, and Records • Student Discipline/Search and Seizure • Student Speech, Press and Dress • Church/State Relations and Equal Access Act • Student Classifications and Diversity Issues • Educating Students with Disabilities • Public Charter Schools and Public School Alternatives

American Public School Law

Author: Kern Alexander
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 049591049X
Format: PDF, Docs
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Alexander and Alexander’s best-selling AMERICAN PUBLIC SCHOOL LAW sets the standard for books in educational law, an increasingly vital area of expertise for today’s school and district administrators. Now in its Eighth Edition, this combined textbook/casebook provides an authoritative and comprehensive view of the law that governs the public school system of the United States, including common law, statutes, and constitutional laws as they affect students, teachers, and administrators. Featuring civil and criminal cases selected from hundreds of jurisdictions and newly updated to reflect the latest legal trends and precedents, the book reviews key laws and relevant court decisions. The case method offers ample opportunity for discussions aimed at discovering and exposing the underlying rules and reasoning, and the text actively encourages readers to relate factual situations to the law while anticipating similar experiences they may have as practicing teachers and administrators. Written in an engaging and accessible style, AMERICAN PUBLIC SCHOOL LAW, Eighth Edition, explains even complex points of law clearly and effectively for non-lawyers, and the authors maintain a diligent focus on the unique needs of professional educators preparing for successful careers in administration. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

The Law of Employment in North Carolina s Public Schools

Author: Robert P. Joyce
Publisher: University of North Carolina Inst of
ISBN: 9781560113034
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"School boards, school administrators and school board attorneys are fortunate to have such a wonderful resource authored by one of the state's leading public employment attorneys. This authoritative treatise on public school employment law provides school personnel with information they need to ensure school system personnel practices and decisions are consistent with legal requirements. I know that I will use this book often and that it will provide to be invaluable in my work with school systems."-Allison Schafer, Legal Counsel/Director of Policy, North Carolina School Boards Association "The most comprehensive book on educaion law in North Carolina. A must for attorneys and others who work in this area."-Tom Stern, Attorneys for the North Carolina Association of Educators "For years, school administrators have asked for a single source summarizing the various state and federal laws and State Board policies that govern employment in North Carolina's schools. Well, it has finally arrived, and its author is Bob Joyce: often quoted, highly respected, and one of the North Carolina's favorite experts in this area. The Law of Employment in North Carolina's Public Schools is a complete source of vital information presented in clear, understandable language. This volume is an absolute necessity for every school administrator who wants accurate information about benefits and employment close at hand!"-Linda Suggs, North Carolina Association of School Administrators A reference guide for school personnel administrators, school attorneys, and school employees, this book explains both the employment powers and responsibilities of school employers and the rights of school employees. It covers aspects of federal law, North Carolina statutory and common law, state board of education regulations, local board of education policies, and policy for specific positions.