Gramsci s Common Sense

Author: Kate Crehan
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822373742
Format: PDF, ePub
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Acknowledged as one of the classics of twentieth-century Marxism, Antonio Gramsci's Prison Notebooks contains a rich and nuanced theorization of class that provides insights that extend far beyond economic inequality. In Gramsci's Common Sense Kate Crehan offers new ways to understand the many forms that structural inequality can take, including in regards to race, gender, sexual orientation, and religion. Presupposing no previous knowledge of Gramsci on the part of the reader, she introduces the Prison Notebooks and provides an overview of Gramsci’s notions of subalternity, intellectuals, and common sense, putting them in relation to the work of thinkers such as Bourdieu, Arendt, Spivak, and Said. In the case studies of the Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street movements, Crehan theorizes the complex relationships between the experience of inequality, exploitation, and oppression, as well as the construction of political narratives. Gramsci's Common Sense is an accessible and concise introduction to a key Marxist thinker whose works illuminate the increasing inequality in the twenty-first century.

Gramsci s Common Sense

Author: Kate Crehan
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780822362197
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Kate Crehan applies Antonio Gramsci's concepts of subalternity, intellectuals, and common sense to offer new ways to understand the many forms that structural inequality can take and the relationships between the experience of inequality, exploitation, and oppression as well as the construction of political narratives.

Gramsci Culture and Anthropology

Author: Kate A. F. Crehan
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520236028
Format: PDF, ePub
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Gramsci, Culture and Anthropology provides an in-depth guide to Gramsci's theories on culture, and their significance for contemporary anthropologists.

Gramsci

Author: Michael Ekers
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118295609
Format: PDF
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This unique collection is the first to bring attention to Antonio Gramsci’s work within geographical debates. Presenting a substantially different reading to Gramsci scholarship, the collection forges a new approach within human geography, environmental studies and development theory. Offers the first sustained attempt to foreground Antonio Gramsci’s work within geographical debates Demonstrates how Gramsci articulates a rich spatial sensibility whilst developing a distinctive approach to geographical questions Presents a substantially different reading of Gramsci from dominant post-Marxist perspectives, as well as more recent anarchist and post-anarchist critiques Builds on the emergence of Gramsci scholarship in recent years, taking this forward through studies across multiple continents, and asking how his writings might engage with and animate political movements today Forges a new approach within human geography, environmental studies and development theory, building on Gramsci’s innovative philosophy of praxis

Unravelling Gramsci

Author: Adam David Morton
Publisher: Pluto Pr
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Examines Gramsci’s understanding of hegemony within the context of uneven development and its links to the global political economy.

California Red

Author: Dorothy Healey
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252062780
Format: PDF, ePub
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Taming Tibet

Author: Emily T. Yeh
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801469775
Format: PDF, ePub
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The violent protests in Lhasa in 2008 against Chinese rule were met by disbelief and anger on the part of Chinese citizens and state authorities, perplexed by Tibetans’ apparent ingratitude for the generous provision of development. In Taming Tibet, Emily T. Yeh examines how Chinese development projects in Tibet served to consolidate state space and power. Drawing on sixteen months of ethnographic fieldwork between 2000 and 2009, Yeh traces how the transformation of the material landscape of Tibet between the 1950s and the first decade of the twenty-first century has often been enacted through the labor of Tibetans themselves. Focusing on Lhasa, Yeh shows how attempts to foster and improve Tibetan livelihoods through the expansion of markets and the subsidized building of new houses, the control over movement and space, and the education of Tibetan desires for development have worked together at different times and how they are experienced in everyday life. The master narrative of the PRC stresses generosity: the state and Han migrants selflessly provide development to the supposedly backward Tibetans, raising the living standards of the Han’s “little brothers.” Arguing that development is in this context a form of “indebtedness engineering,” Yeh depicts development as a hegemonic project that simultaneously recruits Tibetans to participate in their own marginalization while entrapping them in gratitude to the Chinese state. The resulting transformations of the material landscape advance the project of state territorialization. Exploring the complexity of the Tibetan response to—and negotiations with—development, Taming Tibet focuses on three key aspects of China’s modernization: agrarian change, Chinese migration, and urbanization. Yeh presents a wealth of ethnographic data and suggests fresh approaches that illuminate the Tibet Question.