Great River

Author: Paul Horgan
Publisher: Wesleyan University Press
ISBN: 0819562513
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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An epic history of the American southwest.

Lamy of Santa Fe

Author: Paul Horgan
Publisher: Wesleyan University Press
ISBN: 0819573590
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for History (1976) Originally published in 1975, this Pulitzer Prize for History-winning biography chronicles the life of Archbishop Jean Baptiste Lamy (1814-1888), New Mexico’s first resident bishop and the most influential, reform-minded Catholic official in the region during the late 1800s. Lamy’s accomplishments, including the endowing of hospitals, orphanages, and English-language schools and colleges, formed the foundation of modern-day Santa Fe and often brought him into conflict with corrupt local priests. His life story, also the subject of Willa Cather’s Death Comes for the Archbishop, describes a pivotal period in the American Southwest, as Spanish and Mexican rule gave way to much greater influence from the U.S. and Europe. Historian and consummate stylist Paul Horgan has given us a chronicle filled with hardy, often extraordinary adventure, and sustained by Lamy’s magnificent strength of character.

Rio Grande

Author: Jan Reid
Publisher: Univ of Texas Pr
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Docs
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Reid has assembled writings by an astonishing array of leading authors--Larry McMurtry, Woody Guthrie, and more--to explore the politicization, culture, history, and ecology of the vital river.

Great River

Author: Paul Horgan
Publisher: Wesleyan University Press
ISBN: 0819573604
Format: PDF, Docs
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Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for History (1954) Winner of the Bancroft Prize in History (1954) Winner of both the Pulitzer Prize and Bancroft Prize for History, Great River was hailed as a literary masterpiece and enduring classic when it first appeared in 1954. It is an epic history of four civilizations—Native American, Spanish, Mexican, and Anglo-American—that people the Southwest through ten centuries. With the skill of a novelist, the veracity of a scholar, and the love of a long-time resident, Paul Horgan describes the Rio Grande, its role in human history, and the overlapping cultures that have grown up alongside it or entered into conflict over the land it traverses. Now in its fourth revised edition, Great River remains a monumental part of American historical writing.

A Distant Trumpet

Author: Paul Horgan
Publisher: David R. Godine Publisher
ISBN: 9780879238636
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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A magnificently sweeping tale of the American West in the aftermath of the Civil War that is heroic in scale, rich in dramatic action, and filled with brilliant characterizations. Horgan's three-dimensional pageant of the daring and dangerous frontier life has been termed "the finest historical novel in American literature" (Gorham Munson) and "the finest novel yet on the Southwest" (New York Times).Originally published in 1960 ? selling half a million copies at the time ? and first reissued as a Nonpareil paperback in 1991, this immensely popular work of fiction has attracted, informed, and been embraced by a whole new generation of readers.

Winter in Taos

Author: Mabel Dodge Luhan
Publisher: Sunstone Press
ISBN: 1611391377
Format: PDF
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"Winter in Taos" starkly contrasts Luhan's memoirs, published in four volumes and inspired by Marcel Proust's "Remembrances of Things Past." They follow her life through three failed marriages, numerous affairs, and ultimately a feeling of "being nobody in myself," despite years of psychoanalysis and a luxurious lifestyle on two continents among the leading literary, art and intellectual personalities of the day. "Winter in Taos" unfolds in an entirely different pattern, uncluttered with noteworthy names and ornate details. With no chapters dividing the narrative, Luhan describes her simple life in Taos, New Mexico, this "new world" she called it, from season to season, following a thread that spools out from her consciousness as if she's recording her thoughts in a journal. "My pleasure is in being very still and sensing things," she writes, sharing that pleasure with the reader by describing the joys of adobe rooms warmed in winter by aromatic cedar fires; fragrant in spring with flowers; and scented with homegrown fruits and vegetables being preserved and pickled in summer. Having wandered the world, Luhan found her home at last in Taos. "Winter in Taos" celebrates the spiritual connection she established with the "deep living earth" as well as the bonds she forged with Tony Luhan, her "mountain." This moving tribute to a land and the people who eked a life from it reminds readers that in northern New Mexico, where the seasons can be harshly beautiful, one can bathe in the sunshine until "'untied are the knots in the heart,' for there is nothing like the sun for smoothing out all difficulties." Born in 1879 to a wealthy Buffalo family, Mabel Dodge Luhan earned fame for her friendships with American and European artists, writers and intellectuals and for her influential salons held in her Italian villa and Greenwich Village apartments. In 1917, weary of society and wary of a world steeped in war, she set down roots in remote Taos, New Mexico, then publicized the tiny town's inspirational beauty to the world, drawing a steady stream of significant guests to her adobe estate, including artist Georgia O'Keeffe, poet Robinson Jeffers, and authors D.H. Lawrence and Willa Cather. Luhan could be difficult, complex and often cruel, yet she was also generous and supportive, establishing a solid reputation as a patron of the arts and as an author of widely read autobiographies. She died in Taos in 1962.