Harlem in the Twentieth Century

Author: Noreen Mallory
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1614234094
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Harlem is one of the best-known neighborhoods in the U.S., and it's also one of the nation's most vibrant cultural hubs. Though its reputation has been tarnished at times by economic depressions and crime, its loyal community has created a unique history and culture. Much of this history took place during the twentieth century, which included an influx African American residents, an unparalleled artistic, literary and musical movement known as the Harlem Renaissance, deteriorating economic conditions, and finally a thrilling resurgence. This new book presents the grand story of Harlem's twentieth century history as never before.

Race and Nature from Transcendentalism to the Harlem Renaissance

Author: P. Outka
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230614493
Format: PDF, ePub
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Drawing on theories of sublimity, trauma, and ecocriticism, this book examines how the often sharp division between European American and African American experiences of the natural world developed in American culture and history, and how those natural experiences, in turn, shaped the construction of race.

Bengali Harlem and the Lost Histories of South Asian America

Author: Vivek Bald
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674070402
Format: PDF, Docs
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Nineteenth-century Muslim peddlers arrived at Ellis Island, bags heavy with embroidered silks from their villages in Bengal. Demand for “Oriental goods” took these migrants on a curious path, from New Jersey’s boardwalks into the segregated South. Bald’s history reveals cross-racial affinities below the surface of early twentieth-century America.

Becoming African Americans

Author: Clare Corbould
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674032620
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Africa has always played a role in black identity, but it was in the tumultuous period between the two world wars that black Americans first began to embrace a modern African American identity. Throwing off the legacy of slavery and segregation, black intellectuals, activists, and organizations sought a prouder past in ancient Egypt and forged links to contemporary Africa. Their consciousness of a dual identity anticipated the hyphenated identities of new immigrants in the years after World War II, and an emerging sense of what it means to be a modern American.

Encyclopedia of American Poetry The Twentieth Century

Author: Eric L. Haralson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131776322X
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The Encyclopedia of American Poetry: The Twentieth Century contains over 400 entries that treat a broad range of individual poets and poems, along with many articles devoted to topics, schools, or periods of American verse in the century. Entries fall into three main categories: poet entries, which provide biographical and cultural contexts for the author's career; entries on individual works, which offer closer explication of the most resonant poems in the 20th-century canon; and topical entries, which offer analyses of a given period of literary production, school, thematically constructed category, or other verse tradition that historically has been in dialogue with the poetry of the United States.

The New Negro in the Old South

Author: Gabriel A. Briggs
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813574803
Format: PDF
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Standard narratives of early twentieth-century African American history credit the Great Migration of southern blacks to northern metropolises for the emergence of the New Negro, an educated, upwardly mobile sophisticate very different from his forebears. Yet this conventional history overlooks the cultural accomplishments of an earlier generation, in the black communities that flourished within southern cities immediately after Reconstruction. In this groundbreaking historical study, Gabriel A. Briggs makes the compelling case that the New Negro first emerged long before the Great Migration to the North. The New Negro in the Old South reconstructs the vibrant black community that developed in Nashville after the Civil War, demonstrating how it played a pivotal role in shaping the economic, intellectual, social, and political lives of African Americans in subsequent decades. Drawing from extensive archival research, Briggs investigates what made Nashville so unique and reveals how it served as a formative environment for major black intellectuals like Sutton Griggs and W.E.B. Du Bois. The New Negro in the Old South makes the past come alive as it vividly recounts little-remembered episodes in black history, from the migration of Colored Infantry veterans in the late 1860s to the Fisk University protests of 1925. Along the way, it gives readers a new appreciation for the sophistication, determination, and bravery of African Americans in the decades between the Civil War and the Harlem Renaissance.

Gastropolis

Author: Annie Hauck-Lawson
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231136528
Format: PDF, Mobi
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An irresistible sampling of the city's rich food heritage, Gastropolis explores the personal and historical relationship between New Yorkers and food. Beginning with the origins of New York's fusion cuisine, such as Mt. Olympus bagels and Puerto Rican lasagna, the book describes the nature of food and drink before the arrival of Europeans in 1624 and offers a history of early farming practices. Specially written essays trace the function of place and memory in Asian cuisine, the rise of Jewish food icons, the evolution of food enterprises in Harlem, the relationship between restaurant dining and identity, and the role of peddlers and markets in guiding the ingredients of our meals. They share spice-scented recollections of Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx, and colorful vignettes of the avant-garde chefs, entrepreneurs, and patrons who continue to influence the way New Yorkers eat.

The New Negro

Author: Alain Locke
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 147677305X
Format: PDF
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From the man known as the father of the Harlem Renaissance comes a powerful, provocative, and affecting anthology of writers who shaped the Harlem Renaissance movement and who help us to consider the evolution of the African American in society. With stunning works by seminal black voices such as Zora Neale Hurston, Countee Cullen, and W.E.B. DuBois, Locke has constructed a vivid look at the new negro, the changing African American finding his place in the ever shifting sociocultural landscape that was 1920s America. With poetry, prose, and nonfiction essays, this collection is widely praised for its literary strength as well as its historical coverage of a monumental and fascinating time in the history of America.

Feminist Political Ecology

Author: Dianne E. Rocheleau
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415120265
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This book explores the gendered relations of ecologies, economies and politics in communities as diverse as the rubbertappers in the Amazon to activist groups fighting racism in New York and bridges the gap between rural and urban movements.