Love of Country

Author: Madeleine Bunting
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022647173X
Format: PDF, Docs
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Few landscapes are as striking as that of the Hebrides, the hundreds of small islands that speckle the waters off Scotland’s northwest coast. The jagged, rocky cliffs and roiling waves serve as a reminder of the islands’ dramatic geological history, inspiring awe and dread in those drawn there. With Britain at their back and facing the Atlantic, the Hebrides were at the center of ancient shipping routes and have a remarkable cultural history as well, as a meeting place for countless cultures that interacted with a long, rich Gaelic tradition. After years of hearing about Scotland as a place deeply interwoven with the story of her family, Madeleine Bunting was driven to see for herself this place so symbolic and full of history. Most people travel in search of the unfamiliar, to leave behind the comfort of what’s known to explore some suitably far-flung corner of the globe. From the first pages, it’s clear that Madeleine Bunting’s Love of Country marks a different kind of journey—one where all paths lead to a closer understanding of home, but a home bigger than Bunting’s corner of Britain, the drizzly, busy streets of London with their scream of sirens and high-rise developments crowding the sky. Over six years, Bunting returned again and again to the Hebrides, fascinated by the question of what it means to belong there, a question that on these islands has been fraught with tenacious resistance and sometimes tragedy. With great sensitivity, she takes readers through the Hebrides’ history of dispossession and displacement, a history that can be understand only in the context of Britain’s imperial past, and she shows how the Hebrides have been repeatedly used to define and imagine Britain. In recent years, the relationship between Britain and Scotland has been subject to its most testing scrutiny, and Bunting’s travels became a way to reflect on what might be lost and what new possibilities might lie ahead. For all who have wondered how it might feel to stand face-out at the edge of home, Love of Country is a revelatory journey through one of the world’s most remote, beautiful landscapes that encourages us to think of the many identities we wear as we walk our paths, and how it is possible to belong to many places while at the same time not wholly belonging to any.

Hebrides

Author: Peter May
Publisher: Quercus
ISBN: 1623657946
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Since the publication of The Blackhouse in 2011, the books of Peter May's groundbreaking Lewis Trilogy have enthralled millions of readers around the world with powerfully evocative descriptions of the Outer Hebrides. From its peat bogs and heather-coated hills, from its weather-beaten churches and crofters cottages to its cold clear rills choked with rainwater, the islands off the northwest coast of Scotland have been brought to vivid life by this accomplished novelist. Now, Peter May and photographer David Wilson present a photographic record of the countless locations around the Hebridean archipelago that so inspired May when he was bringing the islands of detective Fin McLeod's childhood to the page. From the tiny southern island of Barra to the largest and most northern island of Lewis, travel the storm-whipped North Atlantic scenery with May as he once again strolls the wild and breathtaking countryside that gave birth to his masterful trilogy of novels.

The Hebridean Way

Author: Richard Barrett
Publisher: Cicerone Press Limited
ISBN: 1783625066
Format: PDF, ePub
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Officially launched in 2017, the Hebridean Way offers walkers the opportunity to experience the magic of Scotland's Outer Hebrides in one inspirational journey. The waymarked route stretches 247km (155 miles) from Vatersay to Stornaway, linking ten major islands of the archipelago by means of causeways and two ferry crossings: Vatersay, Barra, Eriskay, South Uist, Benbecula, Grimsay, North Uist, Berneray, Harris and Lewis. Suitable for most walkers with a moderate level of fitness, it can be completed in 8-14 days and is rich in natural, historical and cultural interest. This guidebook presents the Hebridean Way in 10 stages of 16-35km (10-22 miles), plus two additional stages to extend the route to the Butt of Lewis in line with future plans. Detailed route description is accompanied by 1:50,000 OS mapping, stunning photography to whet your appetite and a wealth of information about local points of interest. The introduction offers an overview of the islands' geology, history, plants and wildlife as well as comprehensive practical advice for walking the route, such as when to go, how to get there (and back) and what to take. Accommodation listings can be found in the appendices. The route is a celebration of the diverse landscapes of the Hebrides, from dazzling white shell beaches to wild moorland and flower-strewn machair. It visits Neolithic and Bronze Age remains, ruined forts and castles and monuments commemorating Bonnie Prince Charlie and the Highland Land Struggle. The islands are also a great location to spot seabirds, raptors and a number of migratory species. Informative and inspiring, Richard Barrett's guidebook is an ideal companion to discovering this captivating route.

Outer Hebrides

Author: Mark Rowe
Publisher: Bradt Travel Guides
ISBN: 1784770361
Format: PDF, Kindle
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adt's new guide to the Outer Hebrides: The Western Isles of Scotland, from Lewis to Barra, by experienced writer and journalist Mark Rowe is the only full-size guide to focus solely on the islands of Lewis, Harris, St Kilda, North Uist, Benbecula, South Uist, Eriskay, Barra and Vatersay. Masses of background information is included, from geography and geology to art and architecture, with significant coverage of wildlife, too, as well as all the practical details you could need: when to visit, suggested itineraries, public holidays and festivals, local culture, plus accommodation and where to eat and drink. Walkers, bird-watchers, wildlife photographers, beach lovers and genealogists are all catered for, and this is an ideal guide for those who travel simply with curious minds to discover far-flung places of great cultural, historical and wildlife interest. The Outer Hebrides is an archipelago of 15 inhabited islands and more than 50 others that are free of human footprint. Huge variations in landscape are found across the islands, from Lewisian gneiss, which dates back almost three billion years, to rugged Harris with its magnificent sands running down its western flanks and the windswept, undulating flatness and jagged sea lochs of the Uists. This is a land where Gaelic is increasingly spoken and ancient monuments abound, where stunning seabird colonies and birds of prey can be watched, and where the grassy coastal zones known as the machair are transformed into glorious carpets of wildfllowers in late spring and summer. Whether visiting the Standing Stones of Callanish, the Uig peninsula, Barra's Castle Bay, or historic St Kilda, or if you just want to experience the romance of the Sound of Harris, one of the most beautiful ferry journeys in the world, Bradt's Outer Hebrides: The Western Isles of Scotland, from Lewis to Barra has all the information you need.

The Hebrides

Author: J. M. Boyd
Publisher: Collins
ISBN: 9780007308514
Format: PDF, Docs
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A complete natural history of the Hebrides - an area of great natural beauty, which draws back thousands of visitors year after year to its wonderful scenery and abundant wildlife. This edition is exclusive to newnaturalists.com The Hebrides is an area of great natural beauty, which draws back thousands of visitors year after year to its wonderful scenery and abundant wildlife. Yet, until now, there has been no up-to-date, complete natural history for its many followers to refer to. This new title fills the gap. In a style at once both readable and informative the Drs. J. M. and I. L. Boyd cover every aspect of the islands. Starting with a clear explanation of the geology, climate and hydrography, they move on to a fascinating description of the many varies habitats, from the sea and inland waters through to woodlands and moor and hill. Part II deals with the characteristics of individual islands and their species, while in part III the islands are discussed in the context of their relation to people - starting with the old naturalists, and ending on a topical note with the current interest in conservation.

The Hebrides

Author: Paul Murton
Publisher: Birlinn
ISBN: 9781780274676
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Paul Murton has spent half-a lifetime exploring some of the most beautiful islands in the world - the Hebrides. He has travelled the length and breadth of the Scotland's rugged, six-thousand-mile coast line, and sailed to over eighty islands.In this book Paul visits each of the Hebridean islands in turn, introducing their myths anc legends, history, culture and extraordinary natural beauty. In addition he also meets the people who live there and learns their story. He has met crofters, fishermen, tweed weavers, Gaelic singers, clan chiefs, artists, postmen and bus drivers - people from every walk of life who make the islands tick. This blend of the contemporary and the traditional creates a vivid account of the Hebrides and serves as unique guide to the less well known aspects of life among the islands.