Hispanic Spaces Latino Places

Author: Daniel Arreola
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 029278399X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Hispanics/Latinos are the largest ethnic minority in the United States—but they are far from being a homogenous group. Mexican Americans in the Southwest have roots that extend back four centuries, while Dominicans and Salvadorans are very recent immigrants. Cuban Americans in South Florida have very different occupational achievements, employment levels, and income from immigrant Guatemalans who work in the poultry industry in Virginia. In fact, the only characteristic shared by all Hispanics/Latinos in the United States is birth or ancestry in a Spanish-speaking country. In this book, sixteen geographers and two sociologists map the regional and cultural diversity of the Hispanic/Latino population of the United States. They report on Hispanic communities in all sections of the country, showing how factors such as people's country/culture of origin, length of time in the United States, and relations with non-Hispanic society have interacted to create a wide variety of Hispanic communities. Identifying larger trends, they also discuss the common characteristics of three types of Hispanic communities—those that have always been predominantly Hispanic, those that have become Anglo-dominated, and those in which Hispanics are just becoming a significant portion of the population.

Cultures of Globalization

Author: Kevin Archer
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317996631
Format: PDF
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Much has been written about the economic and political implications of the contemporary process of globalization. Much less has been written about the specific cultural implications. Previously published as a special issue of Globalizations, this book seeks to add to our knowledge of the latter by bringing together researchers from different disciplines with the common goal of exploring the emerging cultural relations among groups and individuals in terms of coherence and hybridity, identity and allegiance, and cooperation and conflict. As the world’s peoples increasingly travel, work, trade, recreate, and otherwise communicate with each other, relative cultural isolation (and isolationism) is becoming less and less possible. What does this mean for cultural coherence, stability and identity across the planet? What have been the cultural implications of, and reactions to, this increasing global interdependence among peoples? From more global and theoretical perspectives to more empirical and case-specific approaches, the various authors attempt to come to terms with the ever evolving and complex cultural content of contemporary globalization.

Di logos Placemaking in Latino Communities

Author: Michael Rios
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136340742
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Latinos are one of the largest and fastest growing social groups in the United States, and their increased presence is profoundly shaping the character of urban, suburban, and rural places. This is a response to these developments and is the first book written for readers seeking to learn about, engage and plan with Latino communities. It considers how placemaking in marginalized communities sheds light on, and can inform, community-building practices of professionals and place dwellers alike. Diálogos: Placemaking in Latino Communities will help readers better understand the conflicts and challenges inherent in placemaking, and to make effective and sustainable choices for practice in an increasingly multi-ethnic world. The essays explore three aspects of place: the appropriation and territorialization of the built environment, the claiming of rights through collective action, and a sense of belonging through civic participation. The authors illustrate their ideas through case studies and explain the implications of their work for placemaking practice. A consistent theme about planning and design practice in Latino communities emerges throughout the book: placemaking happens with or without professional planners and designers. All of the essays in Diálogos demonstrate the need to not only imagine, build, and make places with local communities, but also to re-imagine how we practice democracy inclusive of cross-cultural exchange, understanding, and respect. This will require educators, students, and working professionals to incorporate the knowledge and skills of cultural competency into their everyday practices.

Contemporary Ethnic Geographies in America

Author: Ines M. Miyares
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
ISBN: 9780742568501
Format: PDF
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Ethnic diversity has marked the United States from its inception and is now experiencing watershed changes in its social, cultural, and ethnic/racial geographies. Considering the impact of these transformations, this unique text examines a range of ethnic groups in both historical and contemporary context. The contributors present a rich set of case studies of key ethnic and racial communities—including those of long-standing significance such as Native Americans, African Americans, and Mexican Americans, along with the Latin American and Asian groups that make up the vast majority of newer immigrants. Each case offers a brief historical overview of the group's immigration experience and settlement patterns and discusses how it has transformed—and been transformed by—the places in which they have settled. Exploring changing communities, places, and landscapes, this book offers a nuanced understanding of the evolution of America's ethnic geographies.

Latino Small Businesses and the American Dream

Author: Melvin Delgado
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231521782
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Latino small businesses provide social, economic, and cultural comfort to their communities. They are also excellent facilitators of community capacity—a major component of effective social work practice. Social work practitioners have a vested interest in seeing such businesses grow, not only among Latinos but all communities of color. Reviewing the latest research on formal and informal economies within urban communities of color, Melvin Delgado lays out the demographic foundations for a richer collaboration between theory and practice. Delgado deploys numerous case studies to cement the link between indigenous small businesses and community well-being. Whether regulated or unregulated, these establishments hire from within and promote immigrant self-employment. Latino small businesses often provide jobs for those whose criminal and mental health backgrounds intimidate conventional businesses. Recently estimated to be the largest group of color running small businesses in the United States, Latino owners top two million, with the number expected to double within the next few years. Joining an understanding of these institutions with the kind of practice that enables their social and economic improvement, Delgado explains how to identify and mobilize the kinds of resources that best spur their development.

Hispanic New York

Author: Claudio Iván Remeseira
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 023151977X
Format: PDF, Docs
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Over the past few decades, a wave of immigration has turned New York into a microcosm of the Americas and enhanced its role as the crossroads of the English- and Spanish-speaking worlds. Yet far from being an alien group within a "mainstream" and supposedly pure "Anglo" America, people referred to as Hispanics or Latinos have been part and parcel of New York since the beginning of the city's history. They represent what Walt Whitman once celebrated as "the Spanish element of our nationality." Hispanic New York is the first anthology to offer a comprehensive view of this multifaceted heritage. Combining familiar materials with other selections that are either out of print or not easily accessible, Claudio Iván Remeseira makes a compelling case for New York as a paradigm of the country's Latinoization. His anthology mixes primary sources with scholarly and journalistic essays on history, demography, racial and ethnic studies, music, art history, literature, linguistics, and religion, and the authors range from historical figures, such as José Martí, Bernardo Vega, or Whitman himself, to contemporary writers, such as Paul Berman, Ed Morales, Virginia Sánchez Korrol, Roberto Suro, and Ana Celia Zentella. This unique volume treats the reader to both the New York and the American experience, as reflected and transformed by its Hispanic and Latino components.

Latinos at the Golden Gate

Author: Tomás F. Summers Sandoval Jr.
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469607670
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Born in an explosive boom and built through distinct economic networks, San Francisco has a cosmopolitan character that often masks the challenges migrants faced to create community in the city by the bay. Latin American migrants have been part of the city's story since its beginning. Charting the development of a hybrid Latino identity forged through struggle--latinidad--from the Gold Rush through the civil rights era, Tomas F. Summers Sandoval Jr. chronicles the rise of San Francisco's diverse community of Latin American migrants. This latinidad, Summers Sandoval shows, was formed and made visible on college campuses and in churches, neighborhoods, movements for change, youth groups, protests, the Spanish-language press, and business districts. Using diverse archival sources, Summers Sandoval gives readers a panoramic perspective on the transformation of a multinational, multigenerational population into a visible, cohesive, and diverse community that today is a major force for social and political activism and cultural production in California and beyond.

Latino food culture

Author: Zilkia Janer
Publisher: Greenwood Pub Group
ISBN: 9780313340277
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Discusses the importance of food in Latino culture, presenting an historical overview, a listing of the major food groups and ingredients, recipes, various cooking methods, the importance of meals, and the special dishes prepared for festivals and holiday