Law the State and the International Community

Author: James Brown Scott
Publisher: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.
ISBN: 158477178X
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Scott, James Brown. Law, The State, and the International Community. New York: Columbia University Press, 1939. Two volumes. Reprinted 2002 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. LCCN 2001018648. ISBN 1-58477-178-X. Cloth. $175. * Volume One: A Commentary on the Development of Legal, Political and International Ideals. Volume Two: Extracts Illustrating the Growth of Theories, and Principles of Jurisprudence, Government, and The Law of Nations. "This is a work of ambitious scope and conspicuous industry. It attempts a survey of the chief currents of political and juridical speculation from classical times to the end of the 16th century. The author divides his subject into six main periods: The Greek Background, The Roman Heritage, The Christian Heritage (Ancient and Medieval), The Transition from Medieval to Modern Thought, The Era of Reform, The Beginning of the Modern Age. The terminus is Richard Hooker on the brink of the 17th century. From the Dark Ages onwards, the teachings of twenty celebrated theological, political, and international savants are analyzed and presented in concentrated form. (...) One of Professor Scott's best chapters is on Francisco de Vittoria (c. 1483-1546), who is of particular interest for his influence on Grotius, and to whose remarkable Relectio de Indis Professor Scott has devoted special research." Marke, A Catalogue of the Law Collection at New York University (1953) 926.

Historical Introduction to the Roman Law Classic Reprint

Author: Frederick Parker Walton
Publisher: Forgotten Books
ISBN: 9780266998068
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Excerpt from Historical Introduction to the Roman Law In a general course upon the Roman Law, I do not find it profitable to devote any large proportion of the lectures to its history. There are two methods of teaching the Roman Law, both of which have dis tinguished supporters. One is to present it as a thing apart, without reference to the present. The student is left to make any applications which he may see fit. The other method is to Show the way in which the Roman Law has grown into the modern Civil Law. In a country like England the former method is the more natural, because the Roman Law and the English Law are essentially different systems. In a country of the Civil Law, like the Province of Quebec, the latter method is, I think, the more useful. Between the ancient and the modern law, there is no breach of continuity; the one has grown out of the other. Whichever method we adopt, the law cannot be made intelligible to the student. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

What s Divine about Divine Law

Author: Christine Hayes
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400866413
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In the thousand years before the rise of Islam, two radically diverse conceptions of what it means to say that a law is divine confronted one another with a force that reverberates to the present. What's Divine about Divine Law? untangles the classical and biblical roots of the Western idea of divine law and shows how early adherents to biblical tradition—Hellenistic Jewish writers such as Philo, the community at Qumran, Paul, and the talmudic rabbis—struggled to make sense of this conflicting legacy. Christine Hayes shows that for the ancient Greeks, divine law was divine by virtue of its inherent qualities of intrinsic rationality, truth, universality, and immutability, while for the biblical authors, divine law was divine because it was grounded in revelation with no presumption of rationality, conformity to truth, universality, or immutability. Hayes describes the collision of these opposing conceptions in the Hellenistic period, and details competing attempts to resolve the resulting cognitive dissonance. She shows how Second Temple and Hellenistic Jewish writers, from the author of 1 Enoch to Philo of Alexandria, were engaged in a common project of bridging the gulf between classical and biblical notions of divine law, while Paul, in his letters to the early Christian church, sought to widen it. Hayes then delves into the literature of classical rabbinic Judaism to reveal how the talmudic rabbis took a third and scandalous path, insisting on a construction of divine law intentionally at odds with the Greco-Roman and Pauline conceptions that would come to dominate the Christianized West. A stunning achievement in intellectual history, What's Divine about Divine Law? sheds critical light on an ancient debate that would shape foundational Western thought, and that continues to inform contemporary views about the nature and purpose of law and the nature and authority of Scripture.

The Juridical Review

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Covers general areas of Scottish law including criminal, commercial, contract, delict, environmental, family, administrative, and socio-legal issues. Also includes some articles on comparative law, plus book reviews and case notes.