How Chinese Teach Mathematics

Author: Lianghuo Fan
Publisher: World Scientific
ISBN: 9814415839
Format: PDF, ePub
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This unique book represents another concerted research effort concerning Chinese mathematics education, with contributions from the world's leading scholars and most active researchers. The book presents the latest original research work with a particular focus on the "teaching" side of Chinese mathematics education to a wide international audience. There are mainly three sections in the book. The first section introduces readers to a historical and contemporary perspective, respectively, on traditional mathematical teaching in ancient China and on how modern Chinese mathematics teachers teach and pursue their pre-service training and in-service professional development. The second section presents studies investigating a wide range of issues at both the macro- and micro-levels on how Chinese mathematics teachers teach mathematics. The third section focuses on Chinese mathematics teachers, investigating issues about their knowledge, belief, teacher training and professional development. Like its predecessor, How Chinese Learn Mathematics: Perspectives from Insiders, this book is a must for educational researchers, practitioners, and policy-makers who are interested in knowing more about mathematics teaching, teachers, teacher education and professional development concerning Chinese teachers and learners. Contents:Focusing on Chinese Mathematics Teaching, Teachers and Teacher Education: An IntroductionHistorical and Contemporary Perspectives:The Wisdom of Traditional Mathematical Teaching in China (DAI Qin and CHEUNG Ka Luen) How Chinese Teachers Teach Mathematics and Pursue Professional Development: Perspectives from ContemporaryInternational Research (FAN Lianghuo, MIAO Zhenzhen and MOK Ah Chee Ida) Understanding the Chinese Ways of Teaching Mathematics: Mathematics Teaching in a Chinese Classroom: A Hybrid-Model Analysis of Opportunities for Students' Learning (HUANG Rongjin, MILLER L Diane and TZUR Ron)Achieving Coherence in the Mathematics Classroom: Toward a Framework for Examining Instructional Coherence (WANG Tao, CAI Jinfa and HWANG Stephen) Elementary School Teachers' Instruction in Measurement: Cases of Classroom Teaching of Spatial Measurement in Taiwan (HUANG Hsin-Mei E) Pedagogical and Curriculum Potentials of Homework: A Case Study about Geometric Proofs in Shanghai (FANG Yanping) Teaching Calculation of Time Intervals: Comparing Mathematics Competence of Students in Macau, Hong Kong and the Netherlands (LI Titus Siu Pang) Teaching Number Sense via Interactive Multimedia in a Primary School in Taiwan (YANG Der-Ching, CHEN Pei-Chieh, TSAI Yi Fang and HSIEH Tien-Yu)Teaching Geometrical Theorems in Grade 8 Using the “Shen Tou” Method: A Case Study in Shanghai (DING Liping, JONES Keith and ZHANG Dianzhou) Implementation of Objectives Based on the Curriculum Standards: A Case of Teaching Using Letter to Represent Number at a Chinese Primary School in Chinese Mainland (HUANG Xingfeng, YANG Jinglei and LI Shiqi) Chinese Project-based Classroom Practices: Promoting Students' Engagement in Mathematical Activities (XU Binyan and ZHU Guangtian)A Large-Scale Video Survey on Taiwanese Fourth-Grade Classrooms of Mathematical Teaching Behaviors (LEE Yuan-Shun and LIN Fou-Lai) Features of Exemplary Lessons under the Curriculum Reform in Chinese Mainland: A Study of Thirteen Elementary Mathematics Lessons (MA Yunpeng and ZHAO Dongchen) Qingpu Mathematics Teaching Reform and Its Impact on Student Learning (GU Lingyuan, YANG Yudong and HE Zhenzhen)Chinese Mathematics Teachers, Teacher Education and Teacher Professional Development:Beliefs, Knowledge and Teaching: A Series of Studies about Chinese Mathematics Teachers (ZHANG Qiaoping and WONG Ngai-Ying)What Makes a Master Teacher? A Study of Thirty-One Mathematics Master Teachers in Chinese Mainland (FAN Lianghuo, ZHU Yan and TANG Caibin)Chinese Teachers' Mathematics Beliefs in the Context of Curriculum Reform (CHEN Qian and LEUNG Koon Shing Frederick) "Same Content Different Designs" Activities and Their Impact on Prospective Mathematics Teachers' Professional Development: The Case of Nadine (YUAN Zhiqiang and LI Xuhui)Exploration into Chinese Mathematics Teachers' Perceptions of Concept Map (JIN Haiyue, LU Jun and ZHONG Zhihua) Assisting Teachers in Maintaining High-Level Cognitive Demands of Mathematical Tasks in Classroom Practices: A Training Course in Taiwan (LIN Pi-Jen and TSAI Wen-Huan) The Relationships between Religious Beliefs and Teaching among Mathematics Teachers in Chinese Mainland, Taiwan and Hong Kong (LEU Yuh-Chyn, CHAN Yip-Cheung and WONG Ngai-Ying)Epilogue: Why the Interest in the Chinese Learner? (FAN Lianghuo, WONG Ngai-Ying, CAI Jinfa and LI Shiqi) Readership: Researchers, educators, lecturers, and graduate students in mathematics and education. Keywords:Mathematics;Mathematics Teaching and Learning;Mathematics Education;Chinese Education;China Study;Asian EducationKey Features:Concerted research effort. The book is well-planned, structured, and organizedUnique treatment of the topic: comprehensive and in-depth coverage on teaching, teacher, and teacher education for a wide range of international readersProminent authors and contributors: Many of them are the world's leading scholars or most active researchers

How Chinese Learn Mathematics

Author: Fan Lianghuo
Publisher: World Scientific
ISBN: 9814481998
Format: PDF, ePub
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' The book has been written by an international group of very active researchers and scholars who have a passion for the study of Chinese mathematics education. It aims to provide readers with a comprehensive and updated picture of the teaching and learning of mathematics involving Chinese students from various perspectives, including the ways in which Chinese students learn mathematics in classrooms, schools and homes, the influence of the cultural and social environment on Chinese students' mathematics learning, and the strengths and weaknesses of the ways in which Chinese learn mathematics. Furthermore, based on the relevant research findings, the book explores the implications for mathematics education and offers sound suggestions for reform and improvement. This book is a must for anyone who is interested in the teaching and learning of mathematics concerning Chinese learners. Contents:Overview and International Perspectives:How Have Chinese Students Performed in Mathematics? A Perspective from Large-Scale International Comparisons (L-H Fan & Y Zhu)The Mathematics Curriculum: Toward Globalization or Westernization? (N-Y Wong et al.)Thinking Mathematically by Chinese Learners: A Cross-National Comparative Perspective (J-F Cai & V Cifarelli)An Examination of Coherence in a Chinese Mathematics Classroom (T Wang & J Murphy)A Chinese Cultural Model of Learning (J Li)Official Curriculum in Mathematics in Ancient China: How Did Candidates Study for the Examination? (M K Siu)Context and Teaching Materials:The “Two Basics”: Mathematics Teaching and Learning in Mainland China (D-Z Zhang et al.)A Comparative Study on Composite Difficulty between New and Old Chinese Mathematics Textbooks (J-S Bao)Textbook Use Within and Beyond Chinese Mathematics Classrooms: A Study of 12 Secondary Schools in Kunming and Fuzhou of China (L-H Fan et al.)Thorough Understanding of the Textbook: A Significant Feature of Chinese Teacher Manuals (J-H Li)Effects of Cram Schools on Children's Mathematics Learning (H M Huang)Pedagogy and Learning Processes:Teaching with Variation: A Chinese Way of Promoting Effective Mathematics Learning (L-Y Gu et al.)Cracking the Paradox of Chinese Learners: Looking into the Mathematics Classrooms in Hong Kong and Shanghai (R-J Huang & K S Leung)Identifying a Pattern of Teaching: An Analysis of a Shanghai Teacher's Lessons (F Lopez-Real et al.)Differences Within Communalities: How Is Mathematics Taught in Rural and Urban Regions in Mainland China? (Y-P Ma et al.)Teaching Approach: Theoretical or Experimental? (J Li)Capturing the Chinese Way of Teaching: The Learning-Questioning and Learning-Reviewing Instructional Model (S-H An)The Effects of Different Representations on Mathematics Learning of Chinese Children (B-Y Xu)Inspiration and Future Directions:The CHC Learner's Phenomenon: Its Implications on Mathematics Education (N-Y Wong)How Do Chinese Learn Mathematics? Some Evidence-Based Insights and Needed Directions (J-F Cai et al.) Readership: Researchers, educators, lecturers, and graduate students in mathematics and education. Keywords:Chinese Education;Chinese Learners;Mathematics Education;Cultural Influence;Teaching and Learning;Chinese ClassroomsKey Features:Represents a concerted research effort in mathematics education of Chinese learners, the first of its kindContains contributions from the world's leading scholars and most active researchers in this area and beyondProvides comprehensive coverage and insiders' perspectives on relevant issuesReviews: “A noteworthy feature of the book is that eleven of the chapter authors work in mainland China … The edited collection is a significant contribution to the research literature and provides an important resource in the field.” Research in Mathematics Education “In a context of revolving reforms of the mathematical curricula in the West, the research presented in How Chinese Learn Mathematics certainly gives a lot of food for thought about effectively combining a problem-oriented approach to basic mathematical knowledge and skills with a conceptual and abstract representation of mathematical objects.”EASTM “The book copes with the issue of mathematics education in a culturally attentive way and offer hints to reconsider policies on mathematics education in the Western world. Hence, it should be present in the library of each education department.”EMS Newsletter '

How Chinese Teach Mathematics and Improve Teaching

Author: Yeping Li
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136273557
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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How Chinese Teach Mathematics and Improve Teaching builds upon existing studies to examine mathematics classroom instruction in China. It combines contributions from Chinese scholars with commentary from key Western scholars to offer multiple perspectives in viewing and learning about some important and distinctive features of mathematics classroom instruction. Viewing classroom instruction as part of teachers’ instructional practices, this book goes beyond teachers’ in-classroom instructional practice by also examining Chinese teachers’ approaches and practices in developing and improving teaching. Through this unique approach, How Chinese Teach Mathematics and Improve Teaching expands and unpacks the otherwise fragmented knowledge about Chinese practices in developing and carrying out mathematics classroom instruction. This book is indispensible reading for those interested in Chinese practices in mathematics teaching, and is a key book for teacher educators, school administrators and policy makers in expanding ways of supporting and helping mathematics teachers in instructional development and improvement.

Mathematics Classrooms in Twelve Countries

Author: David Clarke
Publisher: Sense Publishers
ISBN: 907787495X
Format: PDF, ePub
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This book reports the accounts of researchers investigating the eighth grade mathematics classrooms of teachers in Australia, China, the Czech Republic, Germany, Israel, Japan, Korea, The Philippines, Singapore, South Africa, Sweden and the USA. This combination of countries gives good representation to different European and Asian educational traditions, affluent and less affluent school systems, and mono-cultural and multi-cultural societies. Researchers within each local group focused their analyses on those aspects of practice and meaning most closely aligned with the concerns of the local school system and the theoretical orientation of the researchers. Within any particular educational system, the possibilities for experimentation and innovation are limited by more than just methodological and ethical considerations: they are limited by our capacity to conceive possible alternatives. They are also limited by our assumptions regarding acceptable practice. These assumptions are the result of a long local history of educational practice, in which every development was a response to emergent local need and reflective of changing local values. Well-entrenched practices sublimate this history of development. The Learner's Perspective Study is guided by a belief that we need to learn from each other. The resulting chapters offer deeply situated insights into the practices of mathematics classrooms in twelve countries: an insider's perspective. The Project The Learner's Perspective Study aims to juxtapose the observable practices of the classroom and the meanings attributed to those practices by classroom participants. The LPS research design documents sequences of at least ten lessons, using three video cameras, supplemented by the reconstructive accounts of classroom participants obtained in post-lesson video-stimulated interviews, and by test and questionnaire data, and copies of student written material. In each participating country, data generation focuses on the classrooms of three teachers, identified by the local mathematics education community as competent, and situated in demographically different school communities within the one major city. The large body of complex data supports both the characterisation of practice in the classrooms of competent teachers and the development of theory.

Prospective Mathematics Teachers Knowledge of Algebra

Author: Rongjin Huang
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 3658036729
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Rongjin Huang examines teachers’ knowledge of algebra for teaching, with a particular focus on teaching the concept of function and quadratic relations in China and the United States. 376 Chinese and 115 U.S.A. prospective middle and high school mathematics teachers participated in this survey. Based on an extensive quantitative and qualitative data analysis the author comes to the following conclusions: The Chinese participants demonstrate a stronger knowledge of algebra for teaching and the Chinese participants’ structure of knowledge of algebra for teaching is much more interconnected. Chinese participants show flexibility in choosing appropriate perspectives of the function concept and in selecting multiple representations. Finally, the number of college mathematics and mathematics education courses taken impacts the teachers’ knowledge of algebra for teaching.

The Teacher Development Continuum in the United States and China

Author: National Research Council
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 9780309163569
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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In 1999, Liping Ma published her book Knowing and Teaching Elementary Mathematics: Teachers' Understanding of Fundamental Mathematics in the United States and China, which probed the kinds of knowledge that elementary school teachers need to convey mathematical concepts and procedures effectively to their students. Later that year, Roger Howe, a member of the U.S. National Commission on Mathematics Instruction (USNC/MI), reviewed the book for the Notices of the American Mathematical Society, concluding that it 'has lessons for all educational policymakers.' Intrigued by the idea of superrank teachers, the USNC/MI sponsored a workshop entitled 'The Teacher Development Continuum in the United States and China'. The purpose of the workshop was to examine the structure of the mathematics teaching profession in the United States and China. The main presentations and discussion from the workshop are summarized in this volume.

Shadow Education

Author: Mark Bray
Publisher: Asian Development Bank
ISBN: 9290926597
Format: PDF, ePub
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In all parts of Asia, households devote considerable expenditures to private supplementary tutoring. This tutoring may contribute to students' achievement, but it also maintains and exacerbates social inequalities, diverts resources from other uses, and can contribute to inefficiencies in education systems. Such tutoring is widely called shadow education, because it mimics school systems. As the curriculum in the school system changes, so does the shadow. This study documents the scale and nature of shadow education in different parts of the region. Shadow education has been a major phenomenon in East Asia and it has far-reaching economic and social implications.