How the Irish Became White

Author: Noel Ignatiev
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135070695
Format: PDF, Mobi
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'...from time to time a study comes along that truly can be called ‘path breaking,’ ‘seminal,’ ‘essential,’ a ‘must read.’ How the Irish Became White is such a study.' John Bracey, W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies, University of Massachussetts, Amherst The Irish came to America in the eighteenth century, fleeing a homeland under foreign occupation and a caste system that regarded them as the lowest form of humanity. In the new country – a land of opportunity – they found a very different form of social hierarchy, one that was based on the color of a person’s skin. Noel Ignatiev’s 1995 book – the first published work of one of America’s leading and most controversial historians – tells the story of how the oppressed became the oppressors; how the new Irish immigrants achieved acceptance among an initially hostile population only by proving that they could be more brutal in their oppression of African Americans than the nativists. This is the story of How the Irish Became White.

Migration and Performance in Contemporary Ireland

Author: Charlotte McIvor
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137469730
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This book investigates Ireland’s translation of interculturalism as social policy into aesthetic practice and situates the wider implications of this ‘new interculturalism’ for theatre and performance studies at large. Offering the first full-length, post-1990s study of the effect of large-scale immigration and interculturalism as social policy on Irish theatre and performance, McIvor argues that inward-migration changes most of what can be assumed about Irish theatre and performance and its relationship to national identity. By using case studies that include theatre, dance, photography, and activist actions, this book works through major debates over aesthetic interculturalism in theatre and performance studies post-1970s and analyses Irish social interculturalism in a contemporary European social and cultural policy context. Drawing together the work of professional and community practitioners who frequently identify as both artists and activists, Migration and Performance in Contemporary Ireland proposes a new paradigm for the study of Irish theatre and performance while contributing to the wider investigation of migration and performance.

Rubric Nation

Author: Michelle TenamZemach
Publisher: IAP
ISBN: 1623969638
Format: PDF, Mobi
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What is a rubric and how are they being used in teacher education and evaluation? When did rubrics become ubiquitous in the field of education? What impact do rubrics have on students, teachers, teacher educators, and the educational enterprise? This book is an edited volume of essays that critically examine the phenomenon of rubrics in teacher education, evaluation and education more broadly. Rubrics have seen a dramatic rise in use and presence over the past twentyfive years in colleges of education and districts across the country. Although there is a wealth of literature about how to make rubrics, there is scant literature that explores the strengths and weaknesses of rubrics and the impact the rubric phenomenon is having in reshaping education. The chapters included in this edited volume will critically reflect on the contemporary contexts of rubrics and the uses and impact of rubrics in education. Since rubrics have become indelible in education, it is necessary for a fuller, nuanced discussion of the phenomenon. Creating a book that explores these aspects of rubrics is timely and fundamental to expanding the discourse on this ubiquitous evaluation tool. This book is not meant to be a series of chapters dedicated to best practices for creating rubrics, nor is this text meant to present all sides of the rubric discussion. Rather, this text intends to offer critical polemics about rubrics that can spur greater critical discussion about a phenomenon in education that has largely been unquestioned in the literature.

Screen Saviors

Author: Hernán Vera
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
ISBN: 1461642868
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Screen Saviors studies how the self of whites is imagined in Hollywood movies—by white directors featuring white protagonists interacting with people of another color. This collaboration by a sociologist and a film critic, using the new perspective of critical "white studies," offers a bold and sweeping critique of almost a century's worth of American film, from Birth of Nation (1915) through Black Hawk Down (2001). Screen Saviors studies the way in which the social relations that we call "race" are fictionalized and pictured in the movies . It argues that films are part of broader projects that lead us to ignore or deny the nature of the racial divide in which Americans live. Even as the images of racial and ethnic minorities change across the twentieth century, Hollywood keeps portraying the ideal white American self as good-looking, powerful, brave, cordial, kind, firm, and generous: a natural-born leader worthy of the loyalty of those of another color.

Nordic Exposures

Author: Arne Lunde
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295990457
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This series offers interdisciplinary approaches to the study of the Nordic region of Scandinavia and the Baltic States and their cultural connections in North America. By redefining the boundaries of Scandinavian studies to include the Baltic States and Scandinavian America, the series presents books that focus on the study of the culture, history, literature, and politics of the North.

The Organic Globalizer

Author: Christopher Malone
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1628920084
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The Organic Globalizer is a collection of critical essays which takes the position that hip-hop holds political significance through an understanding of its ability to at once raise cultural awareness, expand civil society's focus on social and economic justice through institution building, and engage in political activism and participation. Collectively, the essays assert hip hop's importance as an "organic globalizer:†? no matter its pervasiveness or reach around the world, hip-hop ultimately remains a grassroots phenomenon that is born of the community from which it permeates. Hip hop, then, holds promise through three separate but related avenues: (1) through cultural awareness and identification/recognition of voices of marginalized communities through music and art; (2) through social creation and the institutionalization of independent alternative institutions and non-profit organizations in civil society geared toward social and economic justice; and (3) through political activism and participation in which demands are articulated and made on the state. With editorial bridges between chapters and an emphasis on interdisciplinary and diverse perspectives, The Organic Globalizer is the natural scholarly evolution in the conversation about hip-hop and politics.

The Elusive Dream

Author: Korie L. Edwards
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199886172
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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It is communion Sunday at a mixed-race church. A black pastor and white head elder stand before the sanctuary as lay leaders pass out the host. An African-American woman sings a gospel song as a woman of Asian descent plays the piano. Then a black woman in the congregation throws her hands up and yells, over and over, "Thank you Lawd!" A few other African-Americans in the pews say "Amen," while white parishioners sit stone-faced. The befuddled white head elder reads aloud from the Bible, his soft voice drowned out by the shouts of praise. Even in this proudly interracial church, America's racial divide is a constant presence. In The Elusive Dream, Korie L. Edwards presents the surprising results of an in-depth study of interracial churches: they help perpetuate the very racial inequality they aim to abolish. To arrive at this conclusion, she combines a nuanced analysis of national survey data with an in-depth examination of one particular church. She shows that mixed-race churches adhere strongly to white norms. African Americans in multiracial settings adapt their behavior to make white congregants comfortable. Behavior that white worshipers perceive as out of bounds is felt by blacks as too limiting. Yet to make interracial churches work, blacks must adjust their behavior to accommodate the predilections of whites. They conform to white expectations in church just as they do elsewhere. Thorough, incisive, and surprising, The Elusive Dream raises provocative questions about the ongoing problem of race in the national culture.

Forgeries of Memory and Meaning

Author: Cedric J. Robinson
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469606755
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Cedric J. Robinson offers a new understanding of race in America through his analysis of theater and film of the early twentieth century. He argues that economic, political, and cultural forces present in the eras of silent film and the early "talkies" firmly entrenched limited representations of African Americans. Robinson grounds his study in contexts that illuminate the parallel growth of racial beliefs and capitalism, beginning with Shakespearean England and the development of international trade. He demonstrates how the needs of American commerce determined the construction of successive racial regimes that were publicized in the theater and in motion pictures, particularly through plantation and jungle films. In addition to providing new depth and complexity to the history of black representation, Robinson examines black resistance to these practices. Whereas D. W. Griffith appropriated black minstrelsy and romanticized a national myth of origins, Robinson argues that Oscar Micheaux transcended uplift films to create explicitly political critiques of the American national myth. Robinson's analysis marks a new way of approaching the intellectual, political, and media racism present in the beginnings of American narrative cinema.

White Liberal Identity Literary Pedagogy and Classic American Realism

Author: Phillip Barrish
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780814251454
Format: PDF, ePub
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White Liberal Identity, Literary Pedagogy, and Classic American Realism brings literary works from the turn of the last century face to face with some of the dilemmas and paradoxes that currently define white liberal identity in the United States. Phillip Barrish develops fresh analytic and pedagogical tools for probing contemporary white liberalism, while also offering new critical insights and classroom approaches to American literary realism. New ground is broken by using bold close analysis of works by canonical American realist writers such as Henry James, Edith Wharton, Mark Twain, and Kate Chopin. These contexts include an affirmative-action court case, the liberal arts classroom, and the "war on drugs," as well as current debates about the United States' role on the international scene. Invoking a methodology that he calls "critical presentism," Barrish's book offers a fresh response to that perennial classroom question, often posed most forcefully by students committed to progressive political agendas: why devote so much time and effort to detailed analyses of canonical American literature? This book makes specific contributions not only to American literary and cultural studies, but also to critical race theory, masculinity studies, and critical pedagogy. Book jacket.

Theatre and Globalization

Author: Patrick Lonergan
Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan
ISBN: 9780230214286
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This publication considers the impact of globalisation on contemporary theatre, with particular focus on Irish drama since 1990.