Hugo Ch vez and the Bolivarian Revolution

Author: Barry Cannon
Publisher: Manchester University Press
ISBN: 1847797199
Format: PDF
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The emergence of Hugo Chávez in Venezuela has revived analysis of one of Latin America's most enduring political traditions - populism. Yet Latin America has changed since the heyday of Perón and Evita. Globalisation, implemented through harsh IMF inspired Structural Adjustment Programmes, has taken hold throughout the region and democracy is supposedly the 'only game in town'. This book examines the phenomenon that is Hugo Chávez within these contexts, assessing to what extent his government fits into established ideas on populism in Latin America. The book also provides a comprehensive and critical analysis of Chávez's emergence, his government's social and economic policies, its foreign policy, as well as assessing the charges of authoritarianism brought against him. Written in clear, accessible prose, the book carries debate beyond current polarised views on the Venezuelan president, to consider the prospects of the new Bolivarian model surviving beyond its leader and progenitor, Hugo Chávez.

Hugo Chavez and the Bolivarian Revolution

Author: Richard Gott
Publisher: Verso Books
ISBN: 1844677117
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Looks at the plans and programs of Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez, as well as the challenges that lie ahead. By the author of Cuba: A New History. Original.

Changing Venezuela by Taking Power

Author: Gregory Wilpert
Publisher: Verso Books
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub
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Venezuela under Hugo Chavez could be a model for peaceful revolutionor, as this definitive history shows, it could all be undone by the spectres of the past. Since coming to power in 1998, the Chavez government has inspired both fierce internal debate and horror amongst Western governments accustomed to counting on an obeisant regime in the oil-rich state. Is Venezuela going through a peaceful, democratic "Bolivarian revolution," with the country's poor becoming politically engaged and beginning to share its oil wealth? Or is Chavez leading his country towards Latin American caudillismo at best, or Castro-style communism at worst? In this rich and resourceful study, Greg Wilpert exposes the self-serving logic behind much middle-class opposition to Venezuela's elected leader, and explains the real reason for their alarm. He argues that the Chavez government has instituted one of the world's most progressive constitutions, but warns that they have yet to overcome the dangerous spectres of the country's past: its culture of patronage and clientelism, its corruption, and its support for personality cultsall of them fuelled by the attention and interference of a succession of US administrations.

Civil Society and the State in Left Led Latin America

Author: Barry Cannon
Publisher: Zed Books Ltd.
ISBN: 1780322070
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Timely and unique, this innovative volume provides a critical examination of the role of civil society and its relation to the state throughout left-led Latin America. Featuring a broad range of case studies from across the region, from the Bolivian Constitution to participative budgeting in Brazil to the communal councils in Venezuela, the book examines to what extent these new initiatives are redefining state-civil society relations. Does the return of an active state in Latin America imply the incorporation of civil society representatives in decision-making processes? Is the new left delivering on the promise of participatory democracy and a redefinition of citizenship, or are we witnessing a new democratic deficit? A wide-ranging analysis of a vital issue, both for Latin America and beyond.

Latin America in the Era of the Cuban Revolution and Beyond 3rd Edition

Author: Thomas C. Wright
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440857687
Format: PDF, ePub
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An in-depth explanation of how the Cuban Revolution dictated Latin American politics and U.S.-Latin American relations from the 1950s to the present, including widespread democratization and the rise of the "Pink Tide." • Explains how and why Fidel Castro established communism in Cuba, his motivations for taking Cuba into the Soviet camp, and the consequences of both of these actions • Documents how the repression, dictatorships, and human rights violations of the 1970s and 1980s were unanticipated outcomes of the Cuban Revolution • Clarifies the often confusing and contradictory trends in Latin American political history from the 1950s to the present • Examines the "Pink Tide" of recent leftist governments, including those of Hugo Chávez in Venezuela and Evo Morales in Bolivia

Comandante

Author: Rory Carroll
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101605790
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The inside story of Hugo Chavez’s rule and complex legacy Few leaders in our time have been as divisive and enigmatic as the late Hugo Chavez. In Comandante, acclaimed journalist Rory Carroll tells the inside story of Chavez’s life, his time as Venezuela’s president, and his legacy. Based on interviews with ministers, aides, courtiers, and citizens, this intimate piece of reportage chronicles a unique experiment in power that veers among enlightenment, tyranny, comedy, and farce. Carroll also investigates the almost religious devotion of millions of Venezuelans who regarded Chavez as a savior and the loathing of those who branded him as a dictator. In beautiful prose that blends the lyricism and strangeness of magical realism with the brutal, ugly truth of authoritarianism, Comandante offers a cautionary tale for our times.

Guide to the Perfect Latin American Idiot

Author: Plinio Apuleyo Mendoza
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 156833236X
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Three Latin American writers quote, dissect and review this character in a cultural critique that combines analysis with humor and a relentless self-criticism.

The Right in Latin America

Author: Barry Cannon
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113502183X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Most current analysis on Latin American politics has been directed at examining the shift to the left in the region. Very little attention, however, has been paid to the reactions of the right to this phenomenon. What kind of discursive, policy, and strategic responses have emerged among the right in Latin America as a result of this historic turn to the left? Have there been any shifts in attitudes to inequality and poverty as a result of the successes of the left in those areas? How has the right responded strategically to regain the political initiative from the left? And what implications might such responses have for democracy in the region? The Right in Latin America seeks to provide answers to these questions while helping to fill a gap in the literature on contemporary Latin American politics. Unlike previous studies, Barry Cannon’s book does not simply concentrate on party political responses to the contemporary challenges for the right in the region. Rather he uses a wider, more comprehensive theoretical framework, grounded in political sociology, in recognition of the deep social roots of the right among Latin America’s elites, in a region known for its startling inequalities. Using Michael Mann’s pioneering work on power, he shows how elite dominance in the key areas of the economy, ideology, the military, and in transnational relations, has had a profound influence on the political strategies of the Latin American right. He shows how left governments, especially the more radical ones, have threatened elite power in these areas, influencing right-wing strategic responses as a result. These responses, he persuasively argues, can vary from elections, through street protests and media campaigns, to military coups, depending on the level of perceived threat felt by elites from the left. In this way, Cannon uncovers the dialectical nature of the left/right relationship in contemporary Latin American politics, while simultaneously providing pointers as to how the left can respond to the challenge of the right’s resurgence in the current context of left retrenchment. Cannon’s multi-faceted inter-disciplinary approach, including original research among right-leaning actors in the region makes the book an essential reference not only for those interested in the contemporary Latin American right but for anyone interested in the region’s politics at a critical juncture in its history.

What Is Populism

Author: Jan-Werner Muller
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812248988
Format: PDF, Docs
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Donald Trump, Silvio Berlusconi, Marine Le Pen, Hugo Chávez—populists are on the rise across the globe. But what exactly is populism? Should everyone who criticizes Wall Street or Washington be called a populist? What precisely is the difference between right-wing and left-wing populism? Does populism bring government closer to the people or is it a threat to democracy? Who are "the people" anyway and who can speak in their name? These questions have never been more pressing. In this groundbreaking volume, Jan-Werner Müller argues that at populism's core is a rejection of pluralism. Populists will always claim that they and they alone represent the people and their true interests. Müller also shows that, contrary to conventional wisdom, populists can govern on the basis of their claim to exclusive moral representation of the people: if populists have enough power, they will end up creating an authoritarian state that excludes all those not considered part of the proper "people." The book proposes a number of concrete strategies for how liberal democrats should best deal with populists and, in particular, how to counter their claims to speak exclusively for "the silent majority" or "the real people." Analytical, accessible, and provocative, What Is Populism? is grounded in history and draws on examples from Latin America, Europe, and the United States to define the characteristics of populism and the deeper causes of its electoral successes in our time.

The Early American Republic

Author: Sean Patrick Adams
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1405160977
Format: PDF
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With voices ranging from those of presidents to slaves, from both men and women, and from Native Americans and white settlers, this book tells the story of the first half-century of the United States. Provides students with over 50 essential documents from the Early Republic: the first five decades of the USA Includes lesser-known documents, for example Thomas Jefferson?s rules for ?republican etiquette? Incorporates eyewitness testimony from major historical figures, alongside that of ordinary people from the period Includes an introduction, document headnotes and questions at the end of each chapter designed to encourage students to engage with the material critically