Human and Organizational Factors in Nuclear Safety

Author: Gregory Rolina
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 1138000353
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This book discusses the specifics of safety regulations regarding nuclear risk and how experts contribute to the safety of nuclear installations. Drawing on research conducted in collaboration with the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), the ideas that are put forward rely on a review of the practices of specialists in human and organizational factors concerning nuclear safety. The author shows that the French approach depends on maintaining a technical dialogue between the regulatory authority (ASN), IRSN and nuclear operators. This method of risk management is known as "French cooking" in the Anglo-Saxon world, where a more formal regulatory approach is taken. This technical dialogue does however hold certain benefits, particularly in the field of human and organizational factors, where it allows an advancement of the state of knowledge, which remains incomplete. After the Fukushima accident, in the face of an ongoing European and global re-evaluation of the safety of nuclear power and alignment towards the Anglo-Saxon standard, the French cooking approach may yet be able to make a significant contribution. This work will be of interest to all involved in nuclear power engineering and in the field of risk management and nuclear safety. Includes a preface by Jacques Repussard, Director General, IRSN, France, and a postface by Erik Hollnagel, Professor, Institute of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark / Chief Consultant, Centre for Quality, Region of Southern Denmark.

Safety Culture in Nuclear Power Operations

Author: Bernhard Wilpert
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 020330215X
Format: PDF, ePub
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Technical, psychological and social aspects of industrial safety come under the rigorous scrutiny of scientists and engineers from a vast array of different backgrounds. For many years, as an immediate result of direct international governmental and popular concern, the nuclear power industry has led the safety world. Safety Culture in Nuclear Power Operations presents a cross-disciplinary look at the latest human factors developments in this industry, with wider applications for the entire industrial sector. The book discusses all aspects of safety issues including conceptual bases, societal dynamics and trends, and managing workplace issues and personnel.

Human Reliability and Safety Analysis Data Handbook

Author: David I. Gertman
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9780471591108
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Takes into account the human element as well as the classical aspects of mechanical, electrical and chemical designs that contribute to risk. Features a significant amount of data essential for risk analysis not normally available. Contains numerous examples of authentic applications and case studies.

Safety I and Safety II

Author: Erik Hollnagel
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 1317059794
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Safety has traditionally been defined as a condition where the number of adverse outcomes was as low as possible (Safety-I). From a Safety-I perspective, the purpose of safety management is to make sure that the number of accidents and incidents is kept as low as possible, or as low as is reasonably practicable. This means that safety management must start from the manifestations of the absence of safety and that - paradoxically - safety is measured by counting the number of cases where it fails rather than by the number of cases where it succeeds. This unavoidably leads to a reactive approach based on responding to what goes wrong or what is identified as a risk - as something that could go wrong. Focusing on what goes right, rather than on what goes wrong, changes the definition of safety from ’avoiding that something goes wrong’ to ’ensuring that everything goes right’. More precisely, Safety-II is the ability to succeed under varying conditions, so that the number of intended and acceptable outcomes is as high as possible. From a Safety-II perspective, the purpose of safety management is to ensure that as much as possible goes right, in the sense that everyday work achieves its objectives. This means that safety is managed by what it achieves (successes, things that go right), and that likewise it is measured by counting the number of cases where things go right. In order to do this, safety management cannot only be reactive, it must also be proactive. But it must be proactive with regard to how actions succeed, to everyday acceptable performance, rather than with regard to how they can fail, as traditional risk analysis does. This book analyses and explains the principles behind both approaches and uses this to consider the past and future of safety management practices. The analysis makes use of common examples and cases from domains such as aviation, nuclear power production, process management and health care. The final chapters explain the theoret

Examples of Safety Culture Practices

Author: International Atomic Energy Agency
Publisher:
ISBN: 9789201042972
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Gain information on the practical methods that can be used to ensure safety and protection in peaceful activities involving radiation or radioactive materials. Covering such topics as: nuclear installations, nuclear fuel cycle activities, transport of radioactive material, radiation protection and safety for workers and the public, medical aspects, emergency preparedness, accident response and recovery, radioactive waste management, safety assessment and environmental impact, this series is particularly notable for its descriptive titles.

Advances in Social and Organizational Factors

Author: Peter Vink
Publisher: AHFE Conference
ISBN: 149512102X
Format: PDF, Mobi
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An exploration of how ergonomics can contribute to the solution of important societal and engineering challenges, Advances in Social and Organizational Factors discusses the optimization of sociotechnical systems, including their organizational structures, policies, and processes. It includes coverage of communication, crew resource management, work design, design of working times, teamwork, participatory design, community ergonomics, cooperative work, new work paradigms, organizational culture, virtual organizations, telework, and quality management. The book provides research on urban infrastructures and how to shape urban spaces, including stadiums and museums. It covers warning systems in cars, voice-based interfaces, and the positive effects on manufacturing processes available from health informatics and management systems. Several chapters examine the role human factors can play in counter-terrorism efforts and in interpreting deceptive behaviors. They provide suggestions on how to improve enterprise resource planning systems and stress the importance of lifelong learning, personalized learning, and work-life balance. The book also highlights issues with special populations, detailing how to design and adapt products and work situations for these groups. In addition to exploring the challenges faced in optimizing sociotechnical systems, the book underlines themes that play a role in all the challenges and how they are linked to each other. It concludes with an exploration of emotional ergonomics and the important positive effects of making people happy and healthy. With authors from around the globe, the book supplies a broad look at current challenges and possible solutions.