Illegal Alphabets and Adult Biliteracy

Author: Tomás Mario Kalmar
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317620119
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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How do "illegal aliens" chart the speech sounds of colloquial English? This book is timeless in offering an unusually direct entry into how a group of Mexican fruit pickers analyze their first encounter with local American speech in a tiny rural Midwestern community in the United States. Readers see close up how intelligently migrant workers help each other use what they already know—the alphabetic principle of one letter, one sound—to teach each other, from scratch, at the very first contact, a language which none of them can speak. They see how and why the strategies adult immigrants actually use in order to cope with English in the real world seem to have little in common with those used in publicly funded bilingual and ESL classrooms. What’s new in this expanded edition of Tomás Mario Kalmar’s landmark Illegal Alphabets and Adult Biliteracy are in-depth commentaries from six distinguished scholars—Peter Elbow, Ofelia García, James Paul Gee, Hervé Varenne, Luis Vázquez León, Karen Velasquez—who bring to it their own personal, professional, and (multi)disciplinary viewpoints.

Global Migration Diversity and Civic Education

Author: James A. Banks
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807775215
Format: PDF, Docs
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Mass migration and globalization are creating new and deep challenges to education systems the world over. In this volume, some of the world’s leading researchers in multicultural education and immigration discuss critical issues related to cultural sustainability, structural inclusion, and social cohesion. The authors consider how global migration is forcing nation-states to reexamine and reinvent the ways in which they socialize and educate diverse groups for citizenship and civic engagement. These chapters also address how schools can help migrant and immigrant groups attain the knowledge, values, and skills required to become fully participating citizens, while retaining important aspects of their home, community, languages, and culture. Case studies from the United States and Israel are used to illustrate how these concepts are manifested in two immigrant nations. Contributors: Tali Aderet-German, Ayman K. Agbaria, James A. Banks, Zvi Bekerman, Miriam Ben-Peretz, Amy K. Marks, Minas Michikyan, John P. Myers, Sonia Nieto, Carola Suárez-Orozco, Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco, Guadalupe Valdés, and Gregory White “An invaluable guide to understanding the multiple complexities and challenges involved in designing a transformative multicultural civic education.” —Robert F. Arnove, Indiana University, Bloomington “This impressive volume offers valuable insights to teachers, teacher educators, and researchers concerned with preparing youth to be participating democratic citizens.” —Carole L. Hahn, Emory University “This important book outlines a set of urgent issues for both scholars and practitioners committed to the fuller expression worldwide of education for democracy.” —Margaret Crocco,Michigan State University “A stellar group of scholars integrates the migration question into issues related to teaching and learning, as well as teacher preparation.” —Gloria Ladson-Billings, University of Wisconsin–Madison “This visionary book highlights research, theory, and practices that can be used to help all students become effective and engaged citizens.” —Linda Darling-Hammond, Stanford University and President of the Learning Policy Institute

Literacy Emotion and Authority

Author: Niko Besnier
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521485395
Format: PDF, ePub
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In this study Niko Besnier analyzes the transformation of the Polynesian community of Nukulaelae from a nonliterate into a literate society, using a contemporary perspective that emphasizes literacy as a social practice embedded in a socio-cultural context. His case study, which has implications for understanding literacy in other societies, illuminates the relationship between norm and practice, between structure and agency, and between group and individual.

Literacy and Racial Justice

Author: Catherine Prendergast
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 9780809325245
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In anticipation of the fiftieth anniversary of the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision, Catherine Prendergast draws on a combination of insights from legal studies and literacy studies to interrogate contemporary multicultural literacy initiatives, thus providing a sound historical basis that informs current debates over affirmative action, school vouchers, reparations, and high-stakes standardized testing. As a result of Brown and subsequent crucial civil rights court cases, literacy and racial justice are firmly enmeshed in the American imagination—so much so that it is difficult to discuss one without referencing the other. Breaking with the accepted wisdom that the Brown decision was an unambiguous victory for the betterment of race relations, Literacy and Racial Justice: The Politics of Learning after Brown v. Board of Education finds that the ruling reinforced traditional conceptions of literacy as primarily white property to be controlled and disseminated by an empowered majority. Prendergast examines civil rights era Supreme Court rulings and immigration cases spanning a century of racial injustice to challenge the myth of assimilation through literacy. Advancing from Ways with Words, Shirley Brice Heath’s landmark study of desegregated communities, Prendergast argues that it is a shared understanding of literacy as white property which continues to impact problematic classroom dynamics and education practices. To offer a positive model for reimagining literacy instruction that is truly in the service of racial justice, Prendergast presents a naturalistic study of an alternative public secondary school. Outlining new directions and priorities for inclusive literacy scholarship in America, Literacy and Racial Justice concludes that a literate citizen is one who can engage rather than overlook longstanding legacies of racial strife.

Buying into English

Author: Catherine Prendergast
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre
ISBN: 0822971186
Format: PDF, Docs
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Many developing countries have little choice but to “buy into English” as a path to ideological and material betterment. Based on extensive fieldwork in Slovakia, Prendergast assembles a rich ethnographic study that records the thoughts, aspirations, and concerns of Slovak nationals, language instructors, journalists, and textbook authors who contend with the increasing importance of English to their rapidly evolving world. She reveals how the use of English in everyday life has becomes suffused with the terms of the knowledge and information economy, where language is manipulated for power and profit. Buying into English presents an astute analysis of the factors that have made English so prominent and yet so elusive, and a deconstruction of the myth of guaranteed viability for new states and economies through English.

Books in Print

Author: R.R. Bowker Company
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF
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Books in print is the major source of information on books currently published and in print in the United States. The database provides the record of forthcoming books, books in-print, and books out-of-print.

Teaching Adult English Language Learners

Author: Richard A. Orem
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This resource brings together information about policy, second language acquisition theory and research, methods and materials for teaching adult English language learners, program design, and cross-cultural issues that effect learning in adult ESL classrooms.

American by Paper

Author: Kate Vieira
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780816697526
Format: PDF, Kindle
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American by Paper reveals how two groups of immigrants who share a primary language nevertheless have very different experiences of literacy in the United States. It describes the social realities facing documented and undocumented immigrants who use everyday acts of writing to negotiate papers--the visas, green cards, and passports that promise access to the American Dream. It is both an ethnography, filled with illuminating details about contemporary immigrant lives, and a critical intervention into two leading--and conflicting--scholarly ideas of literacy and its social role. Although popular thinking and scholarship have viewed literacy as a method of culturally assimilating immigrants into the nation, Kate Vieira finds that upward mobility and social inclusion in the United States are tied to literacy in complex ways. She draws from extensive interviews with Portuguese-speaking migrants who live and work together in a former mill town in Massachusetts that she calls South Mills: one group from the Azores, who are usually documented, and another from Brazil, who are usually undocumented. She explains how these migrants experience literacy not as a vehicle for assimilation (as educational policy makers often assert) nor as a means of resisting oppression (as literacy scholars often hope) but instead as tied up in papers, particularly in the papers that confer legal status. Papers and literacy are inextricably bound together, both promoting and constraining opportunities, and they shape why and how migrants read and write. Vieira builds on insights from literacy theories that have long been in opposition to each other in order to develop a new sociomaterial theory of literacy, one that takes into account its inseparable link to paper, forms, and documentation. This point of view leads to a deeper understanding of how literacy actually accrues meaning by circulating, and recirculating, through institutions and the lives of individuals.