Indians Missionaries and Merchants

Author: Kent G. Lightfoot
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520249984
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
"This is a remarkable contribution by an extraordinary anthropologist."—David Hurst Thomas, author of Skull Wars "A groundbreaking work that will be welcomed by both scholars and the general reader who wishes to understand the role of California's past in shaping its future."—Robert L. Hoover, Professor Emeritus, California Polytechnic State University "This is essential reading for every California historian and archaeologist and a superb choice for undergraduate classrooms. Lightfoot's authoritative account gives a long-silenced voice to the many Indians of California."—Jeanne E. Arnold, editor of The Origins of a Pacific Coast Chiefdom

California Indians and Their Environment

Author: Kent Lightfoot
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520942280
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
Capturing the vitality of California's unique indigenous cultures, this major new introduction incorporates the extensive research of the past thirty years into an illuminating, comprehensive synthesis for a wide audience. Based in part on new archaeological findings, it tells how the California Indians lived in vibrant polities, each boasting a rich village life including chiefs, religious specialists, master craftspeople, dances, feasts, and ceremonies. Throughout, the book emphasizes how these diverse communities interacted with the state's varied landscape, enhancing its already bountiful natural resources through various practices centered around prescribed burning. A handy reference section, illustrated with more than one hundred color photographs, describes the plants, animals, and minerals the California Indians used for food, basketry and cordage, medicine, and more. At a time when we are grappling with the problems of maintaining habitat diversity and sustainable economies, we find that these native peoples and their traditions have much to teach us about the future, as well as the past, of California.

Testimonios

Author:
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806153695
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
When in the early 1870s historian Hubert Howe Bancroft sent interviewers out to gather oral histories from the pre-statehood gentry of California, he didn’t count on one thing: the women. When the men weren’t available, the interviewers collected the stories of the women of the household—sometimes almost as an afterthought. These interviews were eventually archived at the University of California, though many were all but forgotten. Testimonios presents thirteen women’s firsthand accounts from the days when California was part of Spain and Mexico. Having lived through the gold rush and seen their country change so drastically, these women understood the need to tell the full story of the people and the places that were their California.

The Natural World of the California Indians

Author: Robert Fleming Heizer
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520038967
Format: PDF
Download Now
Describes patterns of village life, and covers such subjects as Indian tools and artifacts, hunting techniques, and food.--From publisher description.

Contemporary Issues in California Archaeology

Author: Society for American Archaeology, Meeting Staff
Publisher: Left Coast Press
ISBN: 1611320933
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Recent archaeological research on California includes a greater diversity of models and approaches to the region’s past, as older literature on the subject struggles to stay relevant. This comprehensive volume offers an in-depth look at the most recent theoretical and empirical developments in the field including key controversies relevant to the Golden State: coastal colonization, impacts of comets and drought cycles, systems of power, Polynesian contacts, and the role of indigenous peoples in the research process, among others. With a specific emphasis on those aspects of California’s past that resonate with the state’s modern cultural identity, the editors and contributors—all leading figures in California archaeology—seek a new understanding of the myth and mystique of the Golden State.

The Archaeology of Capitalism in Colonial Contexts

Author: Sarah K. Croucher
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781461401926
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
The Archaeology of Capitalism in Colonial Contexts: Postcolonial Historical Archaeologies explores the complex interplay of colonial and capital formations throughout the modern world. The authors present a critical approach to this topic, trying to shift discourses in the theoretical framework of historical archaeology of capitalism and colonialism through the use of postcolonial theory. This work does not suggest a new theoretical framework as such, but rather suggests the importance of revising key theoretical terms employed within historical archaeology, arguing for new engagements with postcolonial theory of relevance to all historical archaeologists as the field de-centers from its traditional locations. Examining case studies from North America, South America, the Caribbean, Africa, Australia, the Middle East, and Europe, the chapters offer an unusually broad ranging geography of historical archaeology, with each focused on the interplay between the particularisms of colonial structures and the development of capitalism and wider theoretical discussions. Every author also draws attention to the ramifications of their case studies in the contemporary world. With its cohesive theoretical framework this volume is a key resource for those interested in decolonizing historical archaeology in theory and praxis, and for those interested in the development of modern global dynamics.

Forging Communities in Colonial Alta California

Author: Kathleen L. Hull
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 0816538921
Format: PDF
Download Now
Between 1769 and 1834, an influx of Spanish, Russian, and then American colonists streamed into Alta California seeking new opportunities. Their arrival brought the imposition of foreign beliefs, practices, and constraints on Indigenous peoples. Forging Communities in Colonial Alta California reorients understandings of this dynamic period, which challenged both Native and non-Native people to reimagine communities not only in different places and spaces but also in novel forms and practices. The contributors draw on archaeological and historical archival sources to analyze the generative processes and nature of communities of belonging in the face of rapid demographic change and perceived or enforced difference. Contributors provide important historical background on the effects that colonialism, missions, and lives lived beyond mission walls had on Indigenous settlement, marriage patterns, trade, and interactions. They also show the agency with which Indigenous peoples make their own decisions as they construct and reconstruct their communities. With nine different case studies and an insightful epilogue, this book offers analyses that can be applied broadly across the Americas, deepening our understanding of colonialism and community. Contributors: Julienne Bernard James F. Brooks John Dietler Stella D’Oro John G. Douglass John Ellison Glenn Farris Heather Gibson Kathleen L. Hull Linda Hylkema John R. Johnson Kent G. Lightfoot Lee M. Panich Sarah Peelo Seetha N. Reddy David W. Robinson Tsim D. Schneider Christina Spellman Benjamin Vargas

After the Gold Rush

Author: David Vaught
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 0801897807
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
Their dramatic story exposes the underside of the American dream and the haunting consequences of trying to strike it rich.

Pablo Tac Indigenous Scholar

Author: Lisbeth Haas
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520261895
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
"Pablo Tac's life was both tragic and victorious, and his experiences echo down through the years, offering the light of understanding to us in our world today. A thought-provoking book and a must-read for students of indigenous California." --Ernest Siva, author of Voices of the Flute: Songs of Three Southern California Indian Nations "This is an exceptional piece of research and the definitive work on Pablo Tac. For the first time the entire corpus of the known writings of this ground-breaking Native Californian scholar are presented without editing, in their original languages (Latin, Luiseño) and in English translation. Lisbeth Haas presents a lucid and insightful account on the life, times, and significance of this important figure, while James Luna provides provocative commentary and striking images about Indian life today in the footsteps of Pablo Tac. This book belongs in the library of anyone interested in California history, Native Californians, and the Franciscan missions." --Kent Lightfoot, author of Indians, Missionaries, and Merchants: The Legacy of Colonial Encounters on the California Frontiers "Lisbeth Haas must be praised for gathering an exceptional team of scholars for the transcription, editing, and translation of Pablo Tac's Luiseño grammar, dictionary, and history. Haas's introductory essay situates Tac in a global context, defined by the fellow students Tac found in Rome in the 1830s while studying for the priesthood. Performance artist James Luna complements Haas's lucid assessment of Tac's brilliance as an indigenous scholar with a verbal and visual testimony of shared struggles as cultural warriors." --José Rabasa, author of Without History: Subaltern Studies, the Zapatista Insurgency, and the Specter of History "The important manuscripts of the young nineteenth-century Luiseño scholar Pablo Tac are available at last to the American public, and most importantly to the people of Tac's homeland. This faithful representation and translation of his work is fascinating in its own right, and enriched further by the insightful introductions by scholar Lisbeth Haas and Luiseño artist and wordsmith James Luna. Tac interweaves his masterful linguistic description and unfinished dictionary of nineteenth-century Luiseño with an illuminating account of Luiseño life and history before and during the mission era. Haas provides an equally interesting description of the scholarly and political environment of Rome where Tac lived, learned, and created from 1834 to 1841. Luna's introduction and a foreword by the Luiseño tribal chair bring a twenty-first century indigenous interpretation to Tac's long-ago life and work. Yet there is a freshness to Tac's writing that is ageless, and makes us wish we could learn even more about this talented young man who participated in so many worlds, and whose life and career were too short." --Leanne Hinton, author of Flutes of Fire: Essays on California Indian Languages

Abalone Tales

Author: Les Field
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822391155
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
For Native peoples of California, the abalone found along the state’s coast have remarkably complex significance as food, spirit, narrative symbol, tradable commodity, and material with which to make adornment and sacred regalia. The large mollusks also represent contemporary struggles surrounding cultural identity and political sovereignty. Abalone Tales, a collaborative ethnography, presents different perspectives on the multifaceted material and symbolic relationships between abalone and the Ohlone, Pomo, Karuk, Hupa, and Wiyot peoples of California. The research agenda, analyses, and writing strategies were determined through collaborative relationships between the anthropologist Les W. Field and Native individuals and communities. Several of these individuals contributed written texts or oral stories for inclusion in the book. Tales about abalone and their historical and contemporary meanings are related by Field and his coauthors, who include the chair and other members of the Muwekma Ohlone Tribe; a Point Arena Pomo elder; the chair of the Wiyot tribe and her sister; several Hupa Indians; and a Karuk scholar, artist, and performer. Reflecting the divergent perspectives of various Native groups and people, the stories and analyses belie any presumption of a single, unified indigenous understanding of abalone. At the same time, they shed light on abalone’s role in cultural revitalization, struggles over territory, tribal appeals for federal recognition, and connections among California’s Native groups. While California’s abalone are in danger of extinction, their symbolic power appears to surpass even the environmental crises affecting the state’s vulnerable coastline.