The Women of Colonial Latin America

Author: Susan Migden Socolow
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316194000
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
In this second edition of her acclaimed volume, The Women of Colonial Latin America, Susan Migden Socolow has revised substantial portions of the book - incorporating new topics and illustrative cases that significantly expand topics addressed in the first edition; updating historiography; and adding new material on poor, rural, indigenous and slave women.

Before Mestizaje

Author: Ben Vinson III
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107026431
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
This book deepens our understanding of race and the implications of racial mixture by examining the history of caste in colonial Mexico.

Urban Slavery in Colonial Mexico

Author: Pablo Miguel Sierra Silva
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 110841981X
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
Focuses on enslaved families and their social networks in the city of Puebla de los Ángeles in seventeenth century colonial Mexico.

The Caudillo of the Andes

Author: Natalia Sobrevilla Perea
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521895677
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
The story of Andrés de Santa Cruz, who lived during the turbulent transition from Spanish colonial rule to the founding of Peru and Bolivia.

In Search of an Inca

Author: Alberto Flores Galindo
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521591341
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
This book examines how people in the Andean region have invoked the Incas to question and rethink colonialism and injustice.

The Body of the Conquistador

Author: Rebecca Earle
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107003423
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
This fascinating history explores the dynamic relationship between overseas colonisation in Spanish America and the bodily experience of eating.

Ambivalent Conquests

Author: Inga Clendinnen
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521527316
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
A study of Mayan conversion in sixteenth-century Yucatan.

Maya Caciques in Early National Yucat n

Author: Rajeshwari Dutt
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806158174
Format: PDF
Download Now
Andrés Canché became the cacique, or indigenous leader, of Cenotillo, Yucatán, in January 1834. By his retirement in 1864, he had become an expert politician, balancing powerful local alliances with his community’s interests as early national Yucatán underwent major political and social shifts. In Maya Caciques in Early National Yucatán, Rajeshwari Dutt uses Canché’s story as a compelling microhistory to open a new perspective on the role of the cacique in post-independence Yucatán. In most of the literature on Yucatán, caciques are seen as remnants of Spanish colonial rule, intermediaries whose importance declined over the early national period. Dutt instead shows that at the individual level, caciques became more politicized and, in some cases, gained power. Rather than focusing on the rebellion and violence that inform most scholarship on post-independence Yucatán, Dutt traces the more quotidian ways in which figures like Canché held onto power. In the process, she presents an alternative perspective on a tumultuous period in Yucatán’s history, a view that emphasizes negotiation and alliance-making at the local level. At the same time, Dutt’s exploration of the caciques’ life stories reveals a larger narrative about the emergence, evolution, and normalization of particular forms of national political conduct in the decades following independence. Over time, caciques fashioned a new political repertoire, forming strategic local alliances with villagers, priests, Spanish and Creole officials, and other caciques. As state policies made political participation increasingly difficult, Maya caciques turned clientelism, or the use of patronage relationships, into the new modus operandi of local politics. Dutt’s engaging exploration of the life and career of Andrés Canché, and of his fellow Maya caciques, illuminates the realities of politics in Yucatán, revealing that seemingly ordinary political relationships were carefully negotiated by indigenous leaders. Theirs is a story not of failure and decline, but of survival and empowerment.