Innovation in Deaf Studies

Author: Annelies Kusters
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190612185
Format: PDF, Docs
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What does it mean to engage in Deaf Studies and who gets to define the field? What would a truly deaf-led Deaf Studies research program look like? What are the research practices of deaf scholars in Deaf Studies, and how do they relate to deaf research participants and communities? What innovations do deaf scholars deem necessary in the field of Deaf Studies? In Innovations in Deaf Studies: The Role of Deaf Scholars, volume editors Annelies Kusters, Maartje De Meulder, and Dai O'Brien and their contributing authors tackle these questions and more. Spurred by a gradual increase in the number of Deaf Studies scholars who are deaf, and by new theoretical trends in Deaf Studies, this book creates an important space for contributions from deaf researchers, to see what happens when they enter into the conversation. Innovations in Deaf Studies expertly foregrounds deaf ontologies (defined as "deaf ways of being") and how the experience of being deaf is central not only to deaf research participants' own ontologies, but also to the positionality and framework of the study as a whole. Further, this book demonstrates that the research and methodology built around those ontologies offer suggestions for new ways for the discipline to meet the challenges of the present, which includes productive and ongoing collaboration with hearing researchers. Providing fascinating perspective and insight, Kusters, De Meulder, O'Brien, and their contributors all focus on the underdeveloped strands within Deaf Studies, particularly on areas around deaf people's communities, ideologies, literature, religion, language practices, and political aspirations.

Innovations in Deaf Studies The Role of Deaf Scholars

Author: Annelies Kusters
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019067153X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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What does it mean to engage in Deaf Studies and who gets to define the field? What would a truly deaf-led Deaf Studies research program look like? What are the research practices of deaf scholars in Deaf Studies, and how do they relate to deaf research participants and communities? What innovations do deaf scholars deem necessary in the field of Deaf Studies? In Innovations in Deaf Studies: The Role of Deaf Scholars, volume editors Annelies Kusters, Maartje De Meulder, and Dai O'Brien and their contributing authors tackle these questions and more. Spurred by a gradual increase in the number of Deaf Studies scholars who are deaf, and by new theoretical trends in Deaf Studies, this book creates an important space for contributions from deaf researchers, to see what happens when they enter into the conversation. Innovations in Deaf Studies expertly foregrounds deaf ontologies (defined as "deaf ways of being") and how the experience of being deaf is central not only to deaf research participants' own ontologies, but also to the positionality and framework of the study as a whole. Further, this book demonstrates that the research and methodology built around those ontologies offer suggestions for new ways for the discipline to meet the challenges of the present, which includes productive and ongoing collaboration with hearing researchers. Providing fascinating perspective and insight, Kusters, De Meulder, O'Brien, and their contributors all focus on the underdeveloped strands within Deaf Studies, particularly on areas around deaf people's communities, ideologies, literature, religion, language practices, and political aspirations.

Diversity in Deaf Education

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190493070
Format: PDF
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Deaf children are not hearing children who can't hear. Beyond any specific effects of hearing loss, as a group they are far more diverse than hearing peers. Lack of full access to language, incidental learning, and social interactions as well as the possibility of secondary disabilities means that deaf learners face a variety of challenges in academic domains. Technological innovations such as digital hearing aids and cochlear implants have improved hearing and the possibility of spoken language for many deaf learners, but parents, teachers, and other professionals are just now coming to recognize that there are cognitive, experiential, and social-emotional differences between deaf and hearing students likely to affect academic outcomes. Sign languages and schools and programs for deaf learners thus remain an important part of the continuum of services needed for this diverse population. Understanding such diversity and determining ways in which to accommodate them must become a top priority in educating deaf learners. Through the participation of an international, interdisciplinary set of scholars, Diversity in Deaf Education takes a broad view of learning and academic progress, considering "the whole child" in the context of the families, languages, educational settings in which they are immersed. In adopting this perspective, the complexities and commonalities in the social, emotional, cognitive, and linguistic mosaic of which the deaf child is a part, are captured. It is only through such a holistic consideration of diverse children developing within diverse settings that we can understand their academic potentials.

The Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies Language and Education Volume 1 Second Edition

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: OUP USA
ISBN: 9780199750986
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In this updated edition of the landmark original volume, a range of international experts present a comprehensive overview of the field of deaf studies, language, and education. Written for students, practitioners, and researchers, The Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies, Language, and Education, Volume 1, is a uniquely ambitious work that has altered both the theoretical and applied landscapes.

Research in Deaf Education

Author: Stephanie Cawthon
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190455659
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Edited by Stephanie W. Cawthon and Carrie Lou Garberoglio, Research in Deaf Education: Contexts, Challenges, and Considerations is a showcase of insight and experience from a seasoned group of researchers across the field of deaf education. Research in Deaf Education begins with foundational chapters in research design, history, researcher positionality, community engagement, and ethics to ground the reader within the context of research in the field. Here, the reader will be motivated to consider significant contemporary issues within deaf education, including the relevance of theoretical frameworks and the responsibility of deaf researchers in the design and implementation of research in the field. As the volume progresses, contributing authors explore scientific research methodologies such as survey design, single case design, intervention design, secondary data analysis, and action research at large. In doing so, these chapters provide solid examples as to how the issues raised in the earlier groundwork of the book play out in diverse orientations within deaf education, including both quantitative and qualitative research approaches. Designed to help guide researchers from the germ of their idea through seeing their work publish, Research in Deaf Education offers readers a comprehensive understanding of the critical issues behind the decisions that go into this rigorous and important research for the community at hand.

Educating Deaf Learners

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0190215194
Format: PDF, Docs
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Education in general, and education for deaf learners in particular, has gone through significant changes over the past three decades. And change certainly will be the buzzword in the foreseeable future. The rapid growth of information and communication technology as well as progress in educational, psychological, and allied research fields have many scholars questioning aspects of traditional school concepts. For example, should the classroom be "flipped" so that students receive instruction online at home and do "homework" in school? At the same time, inclusive education has changed the traditional landscape of special education and thus of deaf education in many if not all countries, and yet deaf children continued to lag significantly behind hearing peers in academic achievement. As a consequence of technological innovations (e.g., digital hearing aids and early bilateral cochlear implants), the needs of many deaf learners have changed considerably. Parents and professionals, however, are just now coming to recognize that there are cognitive, experiential, and social-emotional differences between deaf and hearing students likely to affect academic outcomes. Understanding such differences and determining ways in which to accommodate them through global cooperation must become a top priority in educating deaf learners. Through the participation of an international, interdisciplinary set of scholars, Educating Deaf Learners takes a broader view of learning and academic achievement than any previous work, considering the whole child. In adopting this broad perspective, the authors capture the complexities and commonalities in the social, emotional, cognitive, and linguistic mosaic of which the deaf child is a part. It is only through such a holistic consideration that we can understand their academic potential.

Open Your Eyes

Author: H-Dirksen L. Bauman
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 081664618X
Format: PDF, ePub
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Printbegrænsninger: Der kan printes 10 sider ad gangen og max. 40 sider pr. session

The SAGE Deaf Studies Encyclopedia

Author: Genie Gertz
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 1506300774
Format: PDF, ePub
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The time has come for a new in-depth encyclopedic collection of articles defining the current state of Deaf Studies at an international level and using the critical and intersectional lens encompassing the field. The emergence of Deaf Studies programs at colleges and universities and the broadened knowledge of social sciences (including but not limited to Deaf History, Deaf Culture, Signed Languages, Deaf Bilingual Education, Deaf Art, and more) have served to expand the activities of research, teaching, analysis, and curriculum development. The field has experienced a major shift due to increasing awareness of Deaf Studies research since the mid-1960s. The field has been further influenced by the Deaf community’s movement, resistance, activism and politics worldwide, as well as the impact of technological advances, such as in communications, with cell phones, computers, and other devices. A major goal of this new encyclopedia is to shift focus away from the “Medical/Pathological Model” that would view Deaf individuals as needing to be “fixed” in order to correct hearing and speaking deficiencies for the sole purpose of assimilating into mainstream society. By contrast, The Deaf Studies Encyclopedia seeks to carve out a new and critical perspective on Deaf Studies with the focus that the Deaf are not a people with a disability to be treated and “cured” medically, but rather, are members of a distinct cultural group with a distinct and vibrant community and way of being.

Signs and Voices

Author: Kristin A. Lindgren
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781563685750
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Researchers address in this collection all of the factors changing the cultural landscape for deaf people, including cochlear implants, genetic engineering, mainstreaming, and other ethical dilemmas.

Teaching Deaf Learners

Author: Harry Knoors, PhD
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019979202X
Format: PDF, Docs
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Teaching Deaf Learners asserts that the education of deaf learners profits from an ecological approach to learning and teaching.