Inside Deaf Culture

Author: Carol PADDEN
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674041755
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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"Inside Deaf Culture relates deaf people's search for a voice of their own, and their proud self-discovery and self-description as a flourishing culture. Padden and Humphries show how the nineteenth-century schools for the deaf, with their denigration of sign language and their insistence on oralist teaching, shaped the lives of deaf people for generations to come. They describe how deaf culture and art thrived in mid-twentieth century deaf clubs and deaf theatre, and profile controversial contemporary technologies." Cf. Publisher's description.

Introduction to American Deaf Culture

Author: Thomas K. Holcomb
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199777543
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Introduction to American Deaf Culture provides a fresh perspective on what it means to be Deaf in contemporary hearing society. The book offers an overview of Deaf art, literature, history, and humor, and touches on political, social and cultural themes.

Mindfield

Author: John F. Egbert
Publisher: iUniverse
ISBN: 059542158X
Format: PDF, ePub
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After a terrorist cell ignites an aerosol dispersion of bacterial spinal meningitis, more than three million Americans are left deaf. They must learn to communicate and work to put together their country's civilization.

Bilingualism and Bilingual Deaf Education

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199371830
Format: PDF, ePub
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In Bilingualism and Bilingual Deaf Education, volume editors Marc Marschark, Gladys Tang, and Harry Knoors bring together diverse issues and evidence in two related domains: bilingualism among deaf learners - in sign language and the written/spoken vernacular - and bilingual deaf education. The volume examines each issue with regard to language acquisition, language functioning, social-emotional functioning, and academic outcomes. It considers bilingualism and bilingual deaf education within the contexts of mainstream education of deaf and hard-of-hearing students in regular schools, placement in special schools and programs for the deaf, and co-enrollment programs, which are designed to give deaf students the best of both educational worlds. The volume offers both literature reviews and new findings across disciplines from neuropsychology to child development and from linguistics to cognitive psychology. With a focus on evidence-based practice, contributors consider recent investigations into bilingualism and bilingual programming in different educational contexts and in different countries that may have different models of using spoken and signed languages as well as different cultural expectations. The 18 chapters establish shared understandings of what are meant by "bilingualism," "bilingual education," and "co-enrollment programming," examine their foundations and outcomes, and chart directions for future research in this multidisciplinary area. Chapters are divided into three sections: Linguistic, Cognitive, and Social Foundations; Education and Bilingual Education; and Co-Enrollment Settings. Chapters in each section pay particular attention to causal and outcome factors related to the acquisition and use of these two languages by deaf learners of different ages. The impact of bilingualism and bilingual deaf education in these domains is considered through quantitative and qualitative investigations, bringing into focus not only common educational, psychological, and linguistic variables, but also expectations and reactions of the stakeholders in bilingual programming: parents, teachers, schools, and the deaf and hearing students themselves.

Understanding Deaf Culture

Author: Paddy Ladd
Publisher: Multilingual Matters
ISBN: 9781853595455
Format: PDF
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This text presents a Traveller's Guide to deaf culture, starting from the premise that deaf cultures have an important contribution to make to other academic disciplines, and human lives in general. Within and outside deaf communities, there is a need for an account of the new concept of deaf culture, which enables readers to assess its place alongside work on other minority cultures and multilingual discourses. The book aims to assess the concepts of culture, on their own terms and in their many guises and to apply these to deaf communities. The author illustrates the pitfalls which have been created for those communities by the medical concept of deafness and contrasts this with his new concept of deafhood, a process by which every deaf child, family and adult implicitly explains their existance in the world to themselves and each other.

Getting the Message Across

Author: Jennifer Wiggins
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199757410
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This book provides practical advice to assist genetic counselors, geneticists, and other health professionals wanting to engage appropriately with different clients from different communities — patients who are hearing and/or visually impaired, patients with diverse sex development or religious backgrounds, and those who are available only through interpreter or telephone consultation.

Research Methods in Sign Language Studies

Author: Eleni Orfanidou
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118345967
Format: PDF, ePub
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Research Methods in Sign Language Studies is a landmark work on sign language research, which spans the fields of linguistics, experimental and developmental psychology, brain research, and language assessment. Examines a broad range of topics, including ethical and political issues, key methodologies, and the collection of linguistic, cognitive, neuroscientific, and neuropsychological data Provides tips and recommendations to improve research quality at all levels and encourages readers to approach the field from the perspective of diversity rather than disability Incorporates research on sign languages from Europe, Asia, North and South America, and Africa Brings together top researchers on the subject from around the world, including many who are themselves deaf

Rework

Author: Jason Fried
Publisher: Riemann Verlag
ISBN: 3641041473
Format: PDF, Docs
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Der Gegenentwurf zum unproduktiven Unternehmensalltag Wenn ein Unternehmen erfolgreich sein will, benötigt es angeblich hoch bezahlte Direktoren, lange Meetings, ein großes Werbebudget, Fünfjahrespläne und vor allem ständiges Wachstum. So weit die Theorie. In der Praxis kommen die Software-Unternehmer Jason Fried und David Heinemeier Hansson schon seit 10 Jahren ohne all das aus – und haben Erfolg. Die Autoren repräsentieren eine zukunftsweisende Geschäftskultur, die dabei ist, die alten Konzern-Dinosaurier das Fürchten zu lehren. Smart sind die neuen Unternehmer, beweglich, unprätentiös und technisch auf der Höhe. Arbeit ist für sie kein Selbstzweck, und Lebensqualität gehört ebenso zum Business wie die unvermeidliche menschliche Unzulänglichkeit. Nüchtern und wirksam setzt sich „Rework“ von hochtrabenden Begriffen wie „Reform“ oder „Revolution“ ab. Entstanden ist eine ketzerische „Business-Bibel“, die keine Management-Phrasen herbetet, sondern Mut macht zu echter Eigenständigkeit. Zu Recht schrieb ein Rezensent: „Sie können dieses Buch ignorieren, aber auf eigene Gefahr“.