Inside Schools

Author: Peter Woods
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134929919
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Ethnography has much to offer teachers, especially at a time of growing interest in the `teacher-reseacher' and in `action' and `collaborative' research.

Inside schools

Author: Peter Woods
Publisher: Routledge/Thoemms Press
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Ethnography has much to offer teachers, especially at a time of growing interest in the 'teacher-reseacher' and in 'action' and 'collaborative' research.

Inside Jamaican Schools

Author: Hyacinth L. Evans
Publisher: University of West Indies Press
ISBN: 9789766400972
Format: PDF
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Students and teachers of education in the Caribbean have long relied on ethnographic research from North America to enrich their understanding of life in schools and classrooms. Based on actual experiences from the perspectives of both students and teachers, this collection of ethnographic research articles provides the first up-close view of Jamaican schools and classrooms. Hyacinth Evans and her research team used careful, well-executed interviews and participant observation methods. The result is an insightful view of the ways society's tensions are played out in educational settings, the ways personalities are shaped and identities formed in face-to-face interactions, and the ways circumstances and experiences in the Jamaican setting affect teaching and learning. The articles examine - Student-teacher interaction - Teacher authority - how it is maintained, nurtured, or eroded - The social construction of student interest and attention versus disruptiveness and apathy - Consequences of streaming children in perceived ability groups - Standard Jamaican English (SJE) methods and their effectiveness in teaching Creole-speaking students - Teaching and learning in schools where mater

Impossible Bodies Impossible Selves Exclusions and Student Subjectivities

Author: Deborah Youdell
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1402045492
Format: PDF, Docs
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Brings sophisticated but accessible theoretical tools together with ethnographic data from real schools Demonstrates the inseparability of categories such as gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, ability, disability, special needs Develops tools for understanding the relationships between schools, subjectivities, and students as learners Works across national contexts to show the wide applicability of these tools Problematises narrow understandings of inclusion found in contemporary policy Explores a new politics for interrupting educational inequalities

Inside Hillview High School

Author: Hyacinth L. Evans
Publisher: University of West Indies Press
ISBN:
Format: PDF
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Presents a case study of a Jamaican high school, formerly known as a junior secondary high school. This work demonstrates the continuing education problem encountered by students and teachers in a two-tiered educational system. It provides several solutions for the transformation of schools as places for learning and character development.

An Ethnographic Study of a Special Education School

Author: Frederick Lawrence Patrick
Publisher: Universal-Publishers
ISBN: 0965856496
Format: PDF, ePub
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The purpose of this study was to describe, using the tools of ethnography and qualitative research, selected events in the history of a public special education school and its school culture. The year of the study, 1994-1995, the school served 125 students with cerebral palsy and other disabilities affecting some or all of their physical, sensory, and cognitive abilities. Study participants included faculty and staff, former students, parents, school administrators, and others identified with the school and in the Nashville community during the 1994-1995 school year. In-depth interviews with study participants, on-site observations, semi-structured interviews with informants, document, and archival research were used to create five collective tales based on stories of those who knew the school best between 1975 and 1995. This is a story of one special education school's founding, success, and survival. In recent years, the local school system closed 5 of 7 special education schools, its own K-12 school enrollment declined, and rumors it too would soon close. The story presents a saga of success and survival as the school faced a new social construction of schooling called the "inclusive schools movement." By applying institutional theory to the study of organizations, this study offers an explanation of how one special education school survived the inclusion movement by adapting to societal demands and by maintaining certain environmental elements considered important to school survival. This study provides a number of stories which serve as evidence of how the continuum of services for students with disabilities continues to work as inclusion efforts in some public schools often go awry. This study investigated (1) events beginning with the school's founding in 1975, (2) school success and survival using institutional theory and organizational analysis, and (3) the school as a model day school in special education's continuum or Cascade of Services. At the time of this study, the inclusive schools movement was believed to be responsible for declining enrollments at Harris-Hillman, increasing numbers of students with disabilities being placed in other public and private schools, and rumors the school would soon be closed. Study results offer a collection of stories from one educational setting over two decades. Discussion of these stories is followed by study conclusions that provide support for special education schools and a continuum of service and placement options for students in need of special settings with appropriate curricular content and instruction. It is a unique story of a special education school and its history over 20 years between 1975 and 1995.

Toxic Schools

Author: Bowen Paulle
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022606655X
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Violent urban schools loom large in our culture: for decades they have served as the centerpieces of political campaigns and as window dressing for brutal television shows and movies. Yet unequal access to quality schools remains the single greatest failing of our society—and one of the most hotly debated issues of our time. Of all the usual words used to describe non-selective city schools—segregated, unequal, violent—none comes close to characterizing their systemic dysfunction in high-poverty neighborhoods. The most accurate word is toxic. When Bowen Paulle speaks of toxicity, he speaks of educational worlds dominated by intimidation and anxiety, by ambivalence, degradation, and shame. Based on six years of teaching and research in the South Bronx and in Southeast Amsterdam, Toxic Schools is the first fully participatory ethnographic study of its kind and a searing examination of daily life in two radically different settings. What these schools have in common, however, are not the predictable ideas about race and educational achievement but the tragically similar habituated stress responses of students forced to endure the experience of constant vulnerability. From both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, Paulle paints an intimate portrait of how students and teachers actually cope, in real time, with the chronic stress, peer group dynamics, and subtle power politics of urban educational spaces in the perpetual shadow of aggression.

School Trouble

Author: Deborah Youdell
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136884173
Format: PDF, Docs
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What is the trouble with schools and why should we want to make ‘school trouble’? Schooling is implicated in the making of educational and social exclusions and inequalities as well as the making of particular sorts of students and teachers. For this reason schools are important sites of counter- or radical- politics. In this book, Deborah Youdell brings together theories of counter-politics and radical traditions in education to make sense of the politics of daily life inside schools and explores a range of resources for thinking about and enacting political practices that make ‘school trouble’. The book offers a solid introduction to the much-debated issues of ‘intersectionality’ and the limits of identity politics and the relationship between schooling and the wider policy and political context. It pieces together a series of tools and tactics that might destabilize educational inequalities by unsettling the knowledges, meanings, practices, subjectivities and feelings that are normalized and privileged in the ‘business as usual’ of school life. Engaging with curriculum materials, teachers’ lesson plans and accounts of their pedagogy, and ethnographic observations of school practices, the book investigates a range of empirical examples of critical action in school, from overt political action pursued by educators to day-to-day pedagogic encounters between teachers and students. The book draws on the work of Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Ernesto Laclau and Chantel Mouffe, and Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari to make sense of these practices and identify the political possibilities for educators who refuse to accept the everyday injustices and wide-reaching social inequalities that face us. School Trouble appears at a moment of political and economic flux and uncertainty, and when the policy moves that have promoted markets and private sector involvement in education around the globe have been subject to intense scrutiny and critique. Against this backdrop, renewed attention is being paid to the questions of how politics might be rejuvenated, how societies might be made fair, and what role education might have in pursing this. This book makes an important intervention into this terrain. By exploring a politics of discourse, an anti-identity politics, a politics of feeling, and a politics of becoming, it shows how the education assemblage can be unsettled and education can be re-imagined. The book will be of interest to advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students and scholars in the fields of education, sociology, cultural studies, and social and political science as well as to critical educators looking for new tools for thinking about their practice.

Researching School Experience

Author: Martyn Hammersley
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780750709156
Format: PDF, Mobi
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There is a tendency in much educational thinking to view pupils in passive terms, as the material on which schools operate. This damaging view is challenged here. Significant recent research shows the effects of changing educational conditions on the experience of teaching and learning in schools. By redressing the balance and acknowledging the affective side of pupils and their learning, this book shows that improved understanding leads to improved teaching. Contributions from Stephen Ball, Martyn Descombe, Ann Filer, Andy Hargreaves, Bob Jeffrey, Geoff Troman, Andrew Pollard and Peter Woods.