Intensive Psychotherapy for Persistent Dissociative Processes The Fear of Feeling Real Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology

Author: Richard A. Chefetz
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393710904
Format: PDF, ePub
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Winner of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation's (ISSTD) Pierre Janet Writing Award, 2015. What really happens in dissociation. Winner of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation's (ISSTD) Pierre Janet Writing Award, 2015. What really happens in dissociation. Winner of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation's (ISSTD) Pierre Janet Writing Award, 2015. What really happens in dissociation. Winner of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation's (ISSTD) Pierre Janet Writing Award, 2015. What really happens in dissociation. Dissociative processes have long burdened trauma survivors with the dilemma of longing to feel “real” at the same time as they desperately want to avoid the pain that comes with that healing—a dilemma that often presents particularly acute difficulties for healing professionals. Recent clinical and neurobiological research sheds some light into the dark corners of a mind undergoing persistent dissociation, but its integration into the practice of talking therapy has never, until now, been fully realized. Intensive Psychotherapy for Persistent Dissociative Processes brings readers into the consultation room, and into the minds of both patient and therapist, like no other work on the treatment of trauma and dissociation. Richard A. Chefetz marries neuroscientific sophistication with a wealth of extended case histories, following patients over several years and offering several verbatim session transcripts. His unpacking of the emotionally impactful experience of psychodynamic talking therapy is masterfully written, clearly accessible, and singularly thorough. From neurobiological foundations he builds a working understanding of dissociation and its clinical manifestations. Drawing on theories of self-states and their involvement in dissociative experiences, he demonstrates how to identify persistent dissociation and its related psychodynamic processes, including repetition compulsion and enactment. He then guides readers through the beginning stages of a treatment, with particular attention to the psychodynamics of emotion in both patient and therapist. The second half of the book immerses readers in emotionally challenging clinical processes, offering insight into the neurobiology of fear and depersonalization, as well as case examples detailing struggles with histories of incest, sexual addiction, severe negativity, negative therapeutic reactions, enactment, and object-coercive doubting. The narrative style of Chefetz’s casework is nearly novelistic, bringing to life the clinical setting and the struggles in both patient and therapist. The only mystery in this clinical exposition, as it explores several cases over a number of years, is what will happen next. In the depth of his examples and in continual, self-reflexive analysis of flaws in past treatments, Chefetz is both a generous guide and an expert storyteller. Intensive Psychotherapy for Persistent Dissociative Processes is unique in its ability to place readers in the consultation room of psychodynamic therapy. With an evidence-focused approach based in neurobiology and a bold clinical scope, it will be indispensible to new and experienced therapists alike as they grapple with the most intractable clinical obstacles.

Foundational Concepts in Neuroscience A Brain Mind Odyssey Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology

Author: David E. Presti
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393709612
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Key concepts in neuroscience presented for the non-medical reader. A fresh take on contemporary brain science, this book presents neuroscience—the scientific study of brain, mind, and behavior—in easy-to-understand ways with a focus on concepts of interest to all science readers. Rigorous and detailed enough to use as a textbook in a university or community college class, it is at the same time meant for any and all readers, clinicians and non-clinicians alike, interested in learning about the foundations of contemporary brain science. From molecules and cells to mind and consciousness, the known and the mysterious are presented in the context of the history of modern biology and with an eye toward better appreciating the beauty and growing public presence of brain science.

How People Change Relationships and Neuroplasticity in Psychotherapy

Author: Marion Solomon
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393711773
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Drawing on cutting-edge neuroscience to understand psychotherapeutic change. Growth and change are at the heart of all successful psychotherapy. Regardless of one's clinical orientation or style, psychotherapy is an emerging process that s created moment by moment, between client and therapist. How People Change explores the complexities of attachment, the brain, mind, and body as they aid change during psychotherapy. Research is presented about the properties of healing relationships and communication strategies that facilitate change in the social brain. Contributions by Philip M. Bromberg, Louis Cozolino and Vanessa Davis, Margaret Wilkinson, Pat Ogden, Peter A. Levine, Russell Meares, Dan Hughes, Martha Stark, Stan Tatkin, Marion Solomon, and Daniel J. Siegel and Bonnie Goldstein.

Sex Addiction as Affect Dysregulation A Neurobiologically Informed Holistic Treatment Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology

Author: Alexandra Katehakis
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393712036
Format: PDF, Docs
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Examining the neurobiological underpinnings of sex addiction. Neuroaffective science—studying the integrated development of the body, brain, and mind—has revealed mechanisms linking psychological and biological factors of mental disorders, including addiction. Indeed, its paradigm-shifting theoretical umbrella demonstrated that substance and behavioral dependencies share identical neurobiological workings, and thus that problematic repetitive behaviors are genuine addictions—a state increasingly understood as a chronic brain disorder. Clinical experience strongly suggests that sex addiction (SA) treatment informed by affective neuroscience—the specialty of Alexandra Katehakis—proves profoundly transformative. Katehakis's relational protocol, presented here, blends neurobiology with psychology to accomplish full recovery. Her Psychobiological Approach to Sex Addiction Treatment (PASAT) joins therapist and patient through a relationally-based psychotherapy—a holistic, dyadic dance that calls on the body, brain, and mind of both. Written with clarity and compassion, this book integrates cutting-edge research, case studies, verbatim session records, and patient writings and art. Katehakis explicates neurophysiological, psychological, and cultural forces priming and maintaining SA, then details how her innovative treatment restores patients' interpersonal, sexual, and spiritual relationality.

The Neurobiology of Attachment Focused Therapy Enhancing Connection Trust in the Treatment of Children Adolescents Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology

Author: Jonathan Baylin
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393711056
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Uniting attachment-focused therapy and neurobiology to help distrustful and traumatized children revive a sense of trust and connection. How can therapists and caregivers help maltreated children recover what they were born with: the potential to experience the safety, comfort, and joy of having trustworthy, loving adults in their lives? This groundbreaking book explores, for the first time, how the attachment-focused family therapy model can respond to this question at a neural level. It is a rich, accessible investigation of the brain science of early childhood and developmental trauma. Each chapter offers clinicians new insights—and powerful new methods—to help neglected and insecurely attached children regain a sense of safety and security with caring adults. Throughout, vibrant clinical vignettes drawn from the authors' own experience illustrate how informed clinical processes can promote positive change. Authors Baylin and Hughes have collaborated for many years on the treatment of maltreated children and their caregivers. Both experienced psychologists, their shared project has bee the development of the science-based model of attachment-focused therapy in this book—a model that links clinical interventions to the crucial underlying processes of trust, mistrust, and trust building—helping children learn to trust caregivers and caregivers to be the "trust builders" these children need. The book begins by explaining the neurobiology of blocked trust, using the latest social neuroscience to show how the child's early development gets channeled into a core strategy of defensive living. Subsequent chapters address, among other valuable subjects, how new research on behavioral epigenetics has shown ways that highly stressful early life experiences affect brain development through patterns of gene expression, adapting the child's brain for mistrust rather than trust, and what it means for treatment approaches. Finally, readers will learn what goes on in the child's brain during attachment-focused therapy, honing in on the dyadic processes of adult-child interaction that seem to embody the core "mechanisms of change": elements of attachment-focused interventions that target the child's defensive brain, calm this system, and reopen the child's potential to learn from new experiences with caring adults, and that it is safe to depend upon them. If trust is to develop and care is to be restored, clinicians need to know what prevents the development of trust in the first place, particularly when a child is living in an environment of good care for a long period of time. What do abuse and neglect do to the development of children's brains that makes it so difficult for them to trust adults who are so different from those who hurt them? This book presents a brain-based understanding that professionals can apply to answering these questions and encouraging the development of healthy trust.

Dissociation and the Dissociative Disorders

Author: Paul F. Dell
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135906033
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Winner of ISSTD's 2009 Pierre Janet Writing Award for the best publication on dissociation in 2009! Dissociation and the Dissociative Disorders is a book that has no real predecessor in the dissociative disorders field. It reports the most recent scientific findings and conceptualizations about dissociation; defines and establishes the boundaries of current knowledge in the dissociative disorders field; identifies and carefully articulates the field’s current points of confusion, gaps in knowledge, and conjectures; clarifies the different aspects and implications of dissociation; and sets forth a research agenda for the next decade. In many respects, Dissociation and the Dissociative Disorders both defines and redefines the field.

Rebuilding Shattered Lives

Author: James A. Chu
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781118015063
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Praise for Rebuilding Shattered Lives, Second Edition "In this new edition of Rebuilding Shattered Lives, Dr. Chu distills the wisdom he has gained from many years spent building and directing an extraordinary therapeutic community in a major teaching hospital. Both beginners and experienced clinicians will benefit from this book's unfailing clarity, balance, and pragmatism. An invaluable resource."—Judith L. Herman, MD, Director of Training for the Victims of Violence Program, Cambridge Health Alliance, Cambridge, MA "The need for this work is immense, as is the reward. Thank you, Dr. Chu, for continuing to share your sustaining insight and wisdom in this updated edition."— Christine A. Courtois, founder and principal, Christine A. Courtois PhD & Associates, PLC, Washington, DC; author of Healing the Incest Wound: Adult Survivors in Therapy and Recollections of Sexual Abuse Praise for the first edition: "Dr. James Chu charts a deliberate and thoughtful approach to the treatment of severely traumatized patients. Written in a straightforward style and richly illustrated with clinical vignettes, Rebuilding Shattered Lives is filled with practical advice on therapeutic technique and clinical management. This is a reassuring book that moves beyond the confusion and controversies to address the critical underlying issues and integrate traditional psychotherapy with more recent understanding of the effects of trauma and pathological dissociation." —Frank W. Putnam, MD A fully revised, proven approach to the assessment andtreatment of post-traumatic and dissociative disorders—reflecting treatment advances since 1998 Rebuilding Shattered Lives presents valuable insights into the rebuilding of adult psyches shattered in childhood, drawing on the author's extensive research and clinical experience specializing in treating survivors of severe abuse. The new edition includes: Developments in the treatment of complex PTSD More on neurobiology, crisis management, and psychopharmacology for trauma-related disorders Examination of early attachment relationships and their impact on overall development The impact of disorganized attachment on a child's vulnerability to various forms of victimization An update on the management of special issues This is an essential guide for every therapist working with clients who have suffered severe trauma.

Treating Trauma Related Dissociation A Practical Integrative Approach Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology

Author: Kathy Steele
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 039371263X
Format: PDF, Docs
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Winner of the 2011 International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation (ISSTD) Pierre Janet Writing Award. Establishing safety and working with dissociative parts in complex trauma therapy. Therapists around the world ask similar questions and struggle with similar challenges treating highly dissociative patients. This book arose not only out of countless hours of treating patients with dissociative disorders, but also out of the crucible of supervision and consultation, where therapists bring their most urgent questions, needs, and vulnerabilities. The book offers an overview of the neuropsychology of dissociation as a disorder of non-realization, as well as chapters on assessment, prognosis, case formulation, treatment planning, and treatment phases and goals, based on best practices. The authors describe what to focus on first in a complex therapy, and how to do it; how to help patients establish both internal and external safety without rescuing; how to work systematically with dissociative parts of a patient in ways that facilitate integration rather than further dissociation; how to set and maintain helpful boundaries; specific ways to stay focused on process instead of content; how to deal compassionately and effectively with disorganized attachment and dependency on the therapist; how to help patients integrate traumatic memories; what to do when the patient is enraged, chronically ashamed, avoidant, or unable to trust the therapist; and how to compassionately understand and work with resistances as a co-creation of both patient and therapist. Relational ways of being with the patient are the backbone of treatment, and are themselves essential therapeutic interventions. As such, the book also focused not only on highly practical and theoretically sound interventions, not only on what to do and say, but places strong emphasis on how to be with patients, describing innovative, compassionately collaborative approaches based on the latest research on attachment and evolutionary psychology. Throughout the book, core concepts—fundamental ideas that are highlighted in the text in bold so they can be seen at a glance—are emphasized. These serve as guiding principles in treatment as well as a summing-up of many of the most important notions in each chapter. Each chapter concludes with a section for further examination. These sections include additional ideas and questions, exercises for practicing skills, and suggestions for peer discussions based on topics in a particular chapter, meant to inspire further curiosity, discovery, and growth.

Rebuilding Shattered Lives

Author: James A. Chu
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9780471247326
Format: PDF, ePub
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Every therapist who has worked with adult survivors of severe child abuse is aware of the perils associated with helping to rebuild an adult psyche shattered in childhood. All too often, in their efforts to identify and go beyond the defenses and compensatory tactics of young victims who elect to numb themselves to the pain of abuse, many bright, well-meaning therapists find themselves hopelessly entangled in therapeutic and interpersonal traps. How, in today’s increasingly litigious climate, can therapists be sure that they are pursuing the most rational and effective course of treatment while, at the same time, safeguarding themselves against common professional snares? This book may provide the answer. In Rebuilding Shattered Lives, James A. Chu, MD, describes a proven approach to the assessment and treatment of post-traumatic and dissociative disorders developed at the Dissociative Disorders and Trauma Program at McLean Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Drawing on his extensive empirical research and more than a decade’s clinical experience specializing in treating survivors of severe abuse, Dr. Chu also offers valuable insights into all the major areas of traumarelated symptomatology and provides the most detailed explanation of dissociative theory currently in print. And, with the help of numerous vignettes and case examples, he clearly illustrates common clinical dilemmas encountered when dealing with survivors of severe abuse as well as the most effective techniques for resolving them. The book opens with an integrated, up-to-date account of trauma theory and symptomatology. Chapters focus on complex dissociative and posttraumatic symptoms, difficulties in development and maturation, amnesia and other traumatic memory problems, and differential diagnosis. In the following section, Dr. Chu outlines his treatment strategies and offers valuable guidelines on managing self-destructive behavior, controlling dissociative and post-traumatic symptomatology, and navigating the maze of the therapeutic relationship. Concluding chapters are devoted to special topics and include a review of the latest treatment strategies for dissociative identity disorder, crisis intervention, and working with regressed anti "impossible" patients. Rebuilding Shattered Lives is an important working resource for mental health workers of all levels of experience. Throughout, the writing style is clear, and complex theories are explained with an emphasis on how they provide the conceptual basis for a rational, responsible, and safe approach to treatment.

Affect Regulation Theory A Clinical Model

Author: Daniel Hill
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393711323
Format: PDF
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The rich, complex theory of affect regulation boiled down into a clinically useful guide. Affect regulation theory—the science of how humans regulate their emotions—is at the root of all psychotherapies. Drawing on attachment, developmental trauma, implicit processes, and neurobiology, major theorists from Allan Schore to Daniel Stern have argued how and why regulated affect is key to our optimal functioning. This book translates the intricacies of the theory into a cogent clinical synthesis. With clarity and practicality, Hill decodes the massive body of contemporary research on affect regulation, offering a comprehensible and ready-to-implement model for conducting affect regulation therapy. The book is organized around the four domains of a clinical model: (1) a theory of bodymind; (2) a theory of optimal development of affect regulation in secure attachment relationships; (3) a theory of pathogenesis, in which disordered affect regulation originates in relational trauma and insecure attachment relationships; and (4) a theory of therapeutic actions targeted to repair the affect regulating systems. The key themes of Hill’s affect-focused approach include: how and why different patterns of affect regulation develop; how regulatory patterns are transmitted from caretakers to the infants; what adaptive and maladaptive regulatory patterns look like neurobiologically, psychologically, and relationally; how deficits in affect regulation manifest as psychiatric symptoms and personality disorders; and ultimately, the means by which regulatory deficits can be repaired. Specific chapters explore such subjects as self states, mentalization, classical and modern attachment theory, relational trauma (and its manifestations in chronic dissociation, personality disorders, and pervasive dissociated shame), supporting self-development in therapy, patient–therapist attunement, implicit and explicit therapeutic actions, and many more.