Introduction to Chemical Nomenclature

Author: R. S. Cahn
Publisher: Butterworth-Heinemann
ISBN: 1483162575
Format: PDF, Docs
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Introduction to Chemical Nomenclature: Fifth Edition delves into the nomenclature, the system of how names or terms are formed, of different compounds. The book covers the development of chemical nomenclature; the nomenclature of different ions, salts, and compounds under inorganic chemistry; the principles involved in the nomenclature of organic compounds including hydrocarbons and heterocycles; and special features and functional groups. The selection also covers natural products such as carbohydrates, lipids, steroids, amino acids and nucleic acids, alkaloids, and peptides, as well as the miscellaneous chemical nomenclature, which includes organometallic and isotopically modified compounds and polymers. The text is a good reference for students who have trouble in the nomenclature of different chemical substances and those who want to study the principles behind the chemical nomenclature.

Principles of Chemical Nomenclature

Author: G. J. Leigh
Publisher: Royal Society of Chemistry
ISBN: 1849730075
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Aimed at pre-university and undergraduate students, this volume surveys the current IUPAC nomenclature recommendations in organic, inorganic and macromolecular chemistry.

A New Unifying Biparametric Nomenclature that Spans all of Chemistry

Author: Seymour B. Elk
Publisher: Elsevier
ISBN: 9780080473581
Format: PDF
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As a byproduct of historical development, there are different, unrelated systems of nomenclature for "inorganic chemistry", "organic chemistry", "polymer chemistry", "natural products chemistry", etc. With each new discovery in the laboratory, as well as each new theoretical proposal for a chemical, the lines that traditionally have separated these "distinct" subsets of matter continually grow more blurred. This lack of uniformity in characterizing and naming chemicals increases the communication difficulties between differently trained chemists, as well as other scientists, and greatly impedes progress. With the set of known chemicals numbering over 42,000,000 (in Chemical Abstracts' data base) and continually growing (about 2,000 new additions every day), the desirability for a unified system for naming all chemicals simultaneously grows. Moreover, in order to meet the requirements of disparate groups of scientists, and of society in general, the name assigned to a given chemical should, not only uniquely describe that substance, but also should be a part of a readily recognizable order for the entire field. For these purposes, a topology-based "bi-parametric" system of nomenclature is herein proposed. - In this book, a new nomenclature system is proposed - The new nomenclature is applicable to a three dimensional world, and is internally consistent - This nomenclature unifies ALL branches of chemistry, removing the need for various presently existing sets of rules

Systematic Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry

Author: D. Hellwinkel
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 3642567657
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Hellwinkel gives a short and general introduction to the systematic nomenclature of organic compounds. On the basis of carefully selected examples it offers simple and concise guidelines for the generation of systematic compound names as codified by the IUPAC rules. Besides the most common compound classes important special areas such as cyclophanes, carbohydrates, organometallic and isotopically modified compounds and stereochemical specifications are dealt with. In cases where there is not yet a finalised set of IUPAC rules, possibilities for logical and desirable extensions of existing rules are outlined. Likewise, deviations from Chemical Abstracts and Beilstein index names are noted, if significant. The German version (4th edition) is meanwhile a longseller.

Chemical Nomenclature

Author: K.J. Thurlow
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9401149585
Format: PDF, ePub
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Chemical nomenclature can be a complicated subject. As a result, most works on the subject are rather dry textbooks and primarily consist of sets of instructions on how to name chemicals. This practical book proves that chemical nomenclature can be interesting, not just a `necessary evil'. Written in a lively and engaging style by experts in their particular fields, this new book provides a general discussion on why good, clear nomenclature is needed. It introduces the reader to the various forms of nomenclature without reading like a textbook. Both `systematic' and `trivial' nomenclature systems are used widely (and interchangeably) in chemistry and this new book covers both areas. For example, systematic nomenclature in both the CAS and IUPAC styles is introduced. These systems have many similarities but important differences which the chemist should be aware of. Specialized naming systems are needed for polymers and natural products and these areas are covered in separate chapters. The naming of elements is a very topical subject at the moment and so this is included to ensure a comprehensive coverage. Covering a wide range of topics in the area of nomenclature and acting as an introduction to a varied field, this book will be of interest to industrial chemists as well as students at senior undergraduate and postgraduate level.

IUPAC Recommendations 2005

Author: N. G. Connelly
Publisher: Royal Society of Chemistry
ISBN: 0854044388
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The 'Red Book' is the definitive guide for scientists requiring internationally approved inorganic nomenclature in a legal or regulatory environment.

Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry

Author:
Publisher: Royal Society of Chemistry
ISBN: 0854041826
Format: PDF, Docs
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Chemical nomenclature is used to identify a chemical species by means of written or spoken words and enables a common language for communication amongst chemists. Nomenclature for chemical compounds additionally contains an explicit or implied relationship to the structure of the compound, in order that the reader or listener can deduce the structure from the name. This purpose requires a system of principles and rules, the application of which gives rise to a systematic nomenclature. Of course, a wide range of traditional names, semisystematic or trivial, are also in use for a core group of common compounds. Detailing the latest rules and international practice, this new volume can be considered a guide to the essential organic chemical nomenclature, commonly described as the "Blue Book". An invaluable source of information for organic chemists everywhere and the definitive guide for scientists working in academia or industry, for scientific publishers of books, journals and databases, and for organisations requiring internationally approved nomenclature in a legal or regulatory environment.

Rules for the Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry

Author: L. C. Cross
Publisher: Elsevier
ISBN: 1483284506
Format: PDF, Docs
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Rules for the Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry: Section E: Stereochemistry (Recommendations 1974) deals with the main principles of stereochemistry. The rules discussed in this section have two main objects, namely, to prescribe, for basic views, terms that may provide a common language in all aspects of stereochemistry; and to define the ways in which these terms may be incorporated into the names of individual compounds. This book discusses the steric structure of a compound, which is denoted by an affix or affixes to the name that does not prescribe the stereochemistry. This text explains that isomers are termed stereoisomers when they differ only in the arrangement of the atoms in space. This book explains as well that the terms relative stereochemistry and relative configuration are used to describe the positions of substituents on different atoms in a molecule relative to one another. This book is a valuable resource for organic chemists.