Jos Mart

Author: E. Bejel
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 113712265X
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This book is a critical study of visual representations of José Martí The National Hero of Cuba , and the discourses of power that make it possible for Martí's images to be perceived as icons today. It argues that an observer of Martí's icons who is immersed in the Cuban national narrative experiences a retrospective reconstruction of those images by means of ideologically formed national discourses of power. Also, the obsessive reproduction of Martí's icons signals a melancholia for the loss of the martyr-hero. But instead of attempting to "forget Martí," the book concludes that the utopian impulse of his memory should serve to resist melancholia and to visualize new forms of creative re-significations of Martí and, by extension, the nation.

Accounting for Violence

Author: Ksenija Bilbija
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822350424
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Offering bold new perspectives on the politics of memory in Latin America, scholars analyze the memory markets in six countries that emerged from authoritarian rule in the 1980s and 1990s.

Why Did You Die

Author: Erica Leeuwenburgh
Publisher: New Harbinger Publications
ISBN: 1572246049
Format: PDF, ePub
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When a loved one dies, children are faced with a kaleidoscope of feelings, thoughts, and questions. Struggling with these issues can be overwhelming without guidance, support, and creative forms of expression. This bereavement book contains simple, effective activities to help children and parents communicate about death and the grieving process. Through these activities, children will learn how to grow and thrive after the loss of a loved one.

Portraits 9 11 01

Author: New York Times
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780805073607
Format: PDF, ePub
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Presents portraits of the people whose lives were lost in the September 11 attack on the World Trade Center as published in "The New York Times," including four hundred additional portraits published since February 2002.

Healing After Loss

Author: Martha W. Hickman
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 9780061925771
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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For those who have suffered the loss of a loved one, here are strength and thoughtful words to inspire and comfort.

Hunger of Memory

Author: Richard Rodriguez
Publisher: Bantam
ISBN: 0553898833
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Hunger of Memory is the story of Mexican-American Richard Rodriguez, who begins his schooling in Sacramento, California, knowing just 50 words of English, and concludes his university studies in the stately quiet of the reading room of the British Museum. Here is the poignant journey of a “minority student” who pays the cost of his social assimilation and academic success with a painful alienation — from his past, his parents, his culture — and so describes the high price of “making it” in middle-class America. Provocative in its positions on affirmative action and bilingual education, Hunger of Memory is a powerful political statement, a profound study of the importance of language ... and the moving, intimate portrait of a boy struggling to become a man. From the Paperback edition.

A Time to Mourn a Time to Comfort

Author: Ron Wolfson
Publisher: Jewish Lights Publishing
ISBN: 1580232531
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Describes the Jewish approach to death and dying, funerals, and mourning customs, including specifics for funeral preparations and preparing the home and family to sit shiva, with information for mourners and comforters alike. Reissue.

The Truth About Grief

Author: Ruth Davis Konigsberg
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781439152645
Format: PDF, ePub
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The five stages of grief are so deeply imbedded in our culture that no American can escape them. Every time we experience loss—a personal or national one—we hear them recited: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. The stages are invoked to explain everything from how we will recover from the death of a loved one to a sudden environmental catastrophe or to the trading away of a basketball star. But the stunning fact is that there is no validity to the stages that were proposed by psychiatrist Elisabeth Kübler-Ross more than forty years ago. In The Truth About Grief, Ruth Davis Konigsberg shows how the five stages were based on no science but nonetheless became national myth. She explains that current research paints a completely different picture of how we actually grieve. It turns out people are pretty well programmed to get over loss. Grieving should not be a strictly regimented process, she argues; nor is the best remedy for pain always to examine it or express it at great length. The strength of Konigsberg’s message is its liberating force: there is no manual to grieving; you can do it freestyle. In the course of clarifying our picture of grief, Konigsberg tells its history, revealing how social and cultural forces have shaped our approach to loss from the Gettysburg Address through 9/11. She examines how the American version of grief has spread to the rest of the world and contrasts it with the interpretations of other cultures—like the Chinese, who focus more on their bond with the deceased than on the emotional impact of bereavement. Konigsberg also offers a close look at Kübler-Ross herself: who she borrowed from to come up with her theory, and how she went from being a pioneering psychiatrist to a New Age healer who sought the guidance of two spirits named Salem and Pedro and declared that death did not exist. Deeply researched and provocative, The Truth About Grief draws on history, culture, and science to upend our country’s most entrenched beliefs about its most common experience.

Resilient Grieving

Author: Lucy Hone
Publisher: The Experiment
ISBN: 1615193766
Format: PDF, Mobi
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“This book aims to help you relearn your world . . . to help you navigate the grieving process as best you can—without hiding from your feelings or denying the reality, or significance, of your loss.” —from Resilient Grieving The death of someone we hold dear may be inevitable; being paralyzed by our grief is not. A growing body of research has revealed our capacity for resilient grieving, our innate ability to respond to traumatic loss by finding ways to grow—by becoming more engaged with our lives, and discovering new, profound meaning. Author and resilience/well-being expert Lucy Hone, a pioneer in fusing positive psychology and bereavement research, was faced with her own inescapable sorrow when, in 2014, her 12-year-old daughter was killed in a car accident. By following the strategies of resilient grieving, she found a proactive way to move through her grief, and, over time, embrace life again. Resilient Grieving offers an empowering alternative to the five-stage Kübler-Ross model of grief—and makes clear our inherent capacity for growth following the trauma of a loss that changes everything.

The Country of Memory

Author: Hue-Tam Ho Tai
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520222670
Format: PDF, ePub
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"Hue-Tam Ho Tai's masterful collection of essays that explore how the past is being remade in contemporary Vietnam constitutes a welcome addition to the study of the larger problem of engineering memory, especially in political cultures where the identity of the nation-state is in a considerable state of flux . . .. This book also suggests that the 'commemorative fever' that is sweeping Vietnam is about more than Vietnam's history. It also has a great deal to do with the problems premodern cultures presented to those who promoted the creation of contemporary states. In this regard both Vietnam and this book offer all scholars of nationalism and remembering in the West a fascinating perspective on their own nations."--John Bodnar, Chancellors' Professor of History at Indiana University, from the Foreword