Knowledge and Reference in Empirical Science

Author: Jody Azzouni
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134593430
Format: PDF
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Knowledge and Reference in Empirical Science is a fascinating study of the bounds between science and language: in what sense, and of what, does science provide knowledge? Is science an instrument only distantly related to what's real? Can the language of science be used to adequately describe the truth? In this book, Jody Azziouni investigates the technology of science - the actual forging and exploiting of causal links, between ourselves and what we endeavor to know and understand.

Thing Knowledge

Author: Davis Baird
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520232496
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Baird describes the thing-yness of things, and he shows how objects themselves -- especially scientific instruments -- can represent knowledge of the known world. One can theorize on a culture's knowledge by looking at its tools. Often these physical artifacts are the best remaining products of material culture, they identify the theories of science and technology at the time, and any differences indicated the culture's changing needs or philosophy.

The Sociology of Science

Author: Robert K. Merton
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226520926
Format: PDF
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"The exploration of the social conditions that facilitate or retard the search for scientific knowledge has been the major theme of Robert K. Merton's work for forty years. This collection of papers [is] a fascinating overview of this sustained inquiry. . . . There are very few other books in sociology . . . with such meticulous scholarship, or so elegant a style. This collection of papers is, and is likely to remain for a long time, one of the most important books in sociology."—Joseph Ben-David, New York Times Book Review "The novelty of the approach, the erudition and elegance, and the unusual breadth of vision make this volume one of the most important contributions to sociology in general and to the sociology of science in particular. . . . Merton's Sociology of Science is a magisterial summary of the field."—Yehuda Elkana, American Journal of Sociology "Merton's work provides a rich feast for any scientist concerned for a genuine understanding of his own professional self. And Merton's industry, integrity, and humility are permanent witnesses to that ethos which he has done so much to define and support."—J. R. Ravetz, American Scientist "The essays not only exhibit a diverse and penetrating analysis and a deal of historical and contemporary examples, with concrete numerical data, but also make genuinely good reading because of the wit, the liveliness and the rich learning with which Merton writes."—Philip Morrison, Scientific American "Merton's impact on sociology as a whole has been large, and his impact on the sociology of science has been so momentous that the title of the book is apt, because Merton's writings represent modern sociology of science more than any other single writer."—Richard McClintock, Contemporary Sociology

The Structure and Growth of Scientific Knowledge

Author: G.L. Pandit
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9401576807
Format: PDF, ePub
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Professor Pandit, working among the admirable group of philosophers at the University of Delhi, has written a fundamental criticism and a constructive re-interpretation of all that has been preserved as serious epistemological and methodological reflections on the sciences in modern Western philosoph- from the times of Galileo, Newton, Descartes and Leibniz to those of Russell and Wittgenstein, Carnap and Popper, and, we need hardly add, onward to the troubling relativisms and reconstructions of historical epistemologies in the works of Hanson, Kuhn, Lakatos and Feyerabend. His themes are intrigu ing, set forth as they are with masterly case studies of physics and the life sciences, and within an original conceptual framework for philosophical analysis of the processes, functions, and structures of scientific knowing. Pandit's contributions deserve thoughtful examination. For our part, we wish to point to some among them: (1) an interactive articulation of subjective and objective factors of both problems and theories in the course of scientific development; (2) a striking contrast between the explanatory power of a scientific theory and its 'resolving power', i. e.

Science in the Vanished Arcadia

Author: Miguel de Asúa
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004256776
Format: PDF, Docs
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In Science in the Vanished Arcadia Miguel de Asúa provides the first modern comprehensive account of Jesuit science in the missions of Paraguay and the River Plate region during the 17th and 18th centuries.

Work at the Boundaries of Science

Author: C.L. Palmer
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781402001505
Format: PDF, ePub
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Interdisciplinary inquiry has become more pervasive in recent decades, yet we still know little about the conduct of this type of research or the information problems associated with it. This book is one of few empirical studies of interdisciplinary knowledge practices. It examines how interdisciplinary scientists discover and exchange information and knowledge, highlighting how the boundaries between disciplines affect how information is used and how knowledge is constructed. It is written for scholars and practitioners with an interest in developing information systems and research environments to foster innovative scientific work. Target groups include researchers in information science, science studies, communication, as well as research administrators and information professionals.

Philosophy Science and History

Author: Lydia Patton
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136626883
Format: PDF, ePub
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Philosophy, Science, and History: A Guide and Reader is a compact overview of the history and philosophy of science that aims to introduce students to the groundwork of the field, and to stimulate innovative research. The general introduction focuses on scientific theory change, assessment, discovery, and pursuit. Part I of the Reader begins with classic texts in the history of logical empiricism, including Reichenbach’s discovery-justification distinction. With careful reference to Kuhn’s analysis of scientific revolutions, the section provides key texts analyzing the relationship of HOPOS to the history of science, including texts by Santayana, Rudwick, and Shapin and Schaffer. Part II provides texts illuminating central debates in the history of science and its philosophy. These include the history of natural philosophy (Descartes, Newton, Leibniz, Kant, Hume, and du Châtelet in a new translation); induction and the logic of discovery (including the Mill-Whewell debate, Duhem, and Hanson); and catastrophism versus uniformitarianism in natural history (Playfair on Hutton and Lyell; de Buffon, Cuvier, and Darwin). The editor’s introductions to each section provide a broader perspective informed by contemporary research in each area, including related topics. Each introduction furnishes proposals, including thematic bibliographies, for innovative research questions and projects in the classroom and in the field.

Theology as an Empirical Science

Author: Douglas Clyde Macintosh
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134050267
Format: PDF, ePub
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Investigating the question ‘can theology, description of the divine reality, be made truly scientific?’, this book addresses logic and human knowledge alongside experimental religion. An important philosophic work by a prolific theologian also known for his later court case regarding conscientious objection, this book describes how it is possible to relate theological theory with religious experience of the divine the way that the sciences relate to human acquaintance with things and people in social experience.

Problems in Historical Epistemology

Author: Jerzy Kmita
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9400914210
Format: PDF
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It was only after I had finished this volume that I came across the book by Barry Bames, Scientific Knowledge and Sociologi cal Theory (Routledge and Kegan Paul). I am in full ag, reement with certain ideas expounded in that book, although it also contains others that I must object to. I have decided to make some remarks about them at the beginning of my book, as I believe that they may prove useful by way of int, roduction to the English version of this volume. I hope that anyone who has professional reasons to turn his attention to this volume will have acquainted himself with Scientific Knowledge and Socio logical Theory before he proceeds any further. I fully share Barnes' view that it is possible and desirable to undertake descrtptive-sociological investigations of scientific research. The main subjeot of this research should be the na tural science, and, moreover, such findings in these sciences whose cognitive value has never been questioned by profession als. These investigations must avoid becoming entangled in epistemologtical controversies, and through epi:stemo}. ogy in, phi losophical controversies. They must not defend any of the contended theses and must not Hrterally, rely on evaluative pre mises that have been questicmed.