Kuru Sorcery

Author: Shirley Lindenbaum
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317264711
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Perhaps the best-documented epidemic in the history of medicine, kuru has been studied for more than fifty years by international investigators from medicine and the human sciences. This significantly revised edition of the landmark anthropological classic Kuru Sorcery brings up to date the anthropological contribution to understanding disease, the medical research that resulted in two medical Nobel Prizes, and the views of the Fore people who endured the epidemic and who still believe that sorcerers, rather than cannibalism, caused kuru. The kuru epidemic serves as a prism through which to see how Fore notions of disease causation bring into single focus their views about the body, the world of social and spiritual relations, and changes in economic and political conditions-aspects of thought and behaviour that Western medicine keeps separate.

Kuru Sorcery

Author: Shirley Lindenbaum
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781612052762
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Kuru, a fatal neurological disease thought to be transmitted through cannibalism, is examined in the Fore, a New Guinea people afflicted with the disease, who believe it to be caused by sorcery. The author also discusses Fore beliefs about diagnosis and prevention of other diseases.

Evolution and Prehistory The Human Challenge

Author: William Haviland
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 049538190X
Format: PDF, ePub
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Explore evolution and prehistory through photos, examples, and anthropologists' studies with Haviland et al's EVOLUTION AND PREHISTORY. The authors' goal in writing this book is to provide you with a vivid, accessible text that shows how the field is relevant to understanding the complex world around you. With Haviland et al, you will have the opportunity to explore the different ways humans face the challenge of existence, learn about the connection between biology and culture in shaping human beliefs and behavior, and see the impact of globalization on peoples and cultures around the world. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Understanding Viruses

Author: Teri Shors
Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Learning
ISBN: 9780763729325
Format: PDF, Mobi
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"Combining the molecular, clinical, and historical aspects of virology, Understanding Viruses is a textbook for the modern undergraduate virology course. The text provides an introduction to human viral diseases. Additional chapters on viral diseases of animals; the history of clinical trials, gene therapy, and xenotransplantation; prions and viroids; plant viruses; and bacteriophages add to the coverage."--BOOK JACKET.

Plagues and Epidemics

Author: D. Ann Herring
Publisher: Berg
ISBN: 1847887554
Format: PDF, Docs
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Until recently, plagues were thought to belong in the ancient past. Now there are deep worries about global pandemics. This book presents views from anthropology about this much publicized and complex problem. The authors take us to places where epidemics are erupting, waning, or gone, and to other places where they have not yet arrived, but where a frightening story line is already in place. They explore public health bureaucracies and political arenas where the power lies to make decisions about what is, and is not, an epidemic. They look back into global history to uncover disease trends and look ahead to a future of expanding plagues within the context of climate change. The chapters are written from a range of perspectives, from the science of modeling epidemics to the social science of understanding them. Patterns emerge when people are engulfed by diseases labeled as epidemics but which have the hallmarks of plague. There are cycles of shame and blame, stigma, isolation of the sick, fear of contagion, and end-of-the-world scenarios. Plague, it would seem, is still among us.

Food Medicine and the Quest for Good Health

Author: Nancy N. Chen
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231508913
Format: PDF, Kindle
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What we eat, how we eat, where we eat, and when we eat are deeply embedded cultural practices. Eating is also related to how we medicate. The multimillion-dollar diet industry offers advice on how to eat for a better body and longer life, and avoiding harmful foods (or choosing healthy ones) is considered separate from consuming medicine another multimillion-dollar industry. In contrast, most traditional medical systems view food as inseparable from medicine and regard medicinal foods as the front line of healing. Drawing on medical texts and food therapy practices from around the world and throughout history, Nancy N. Chen locates old and new crossovers between food and medicine in different social and cultural contexts. The consumption of spices, sugar, and salt was once linked to specific healing properties, and trade in these commodities transformed not just the political economy of Europe, Asia, and the New World but local tastes and food practices as well. Today's technologies are rapidly changing traditional attitudes toward food, enabling the cultivation of new admixtures, such as nutraceuticals and genetically modified food, that link food to medicine in novel ways. Chen considers these developments against the evolving food regimes of the diet industry in order to build a framework for understanding diet as individual practice, social prescription, and political formation.

The Culture Bound Syndromes

Author: Ronald C. Simons
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9400952511
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In the last few years there has been a great revival of interest in culture-bound psychiatric syndromes. A spate of new papers has been published on well known and less familiar syndromes, and there have been a number of attempts to put some order into the field of inquiry. In a review of the literature on culture-bound syndromes up to 1969 Yap made certain suggestions for organizing thinking about them which for the most part have not received general acceptance (see Carr, this volume, p. 199). Through the seventies new descriptive and conceptual work was scarce, but in the last few years books and papers discussing the field were authored or edited by Tseng and McDermott (1981), AI-Issa (1982), Friedman and Faguet (1982) and Murphy (1982). In 1983 Favazza summarized his understanding of the state of current thinking for the fourth edition of the Comprehensive Textbook of Psychiatry, and a symposium on culture-bound syndromes was organized by Kenny for the Eighth International Congress of Anthropology and Ethnology. The strong est impression to emerge from all this recent work is that there is no substantive consensus, and that the very concept, "culture-bound syndrome" could well use some serious reconsideration. As the role of culture-specific beliefs and prac tices in all affliction has come to be increasingly recognized it has become less and less clear what sets the culture-bound syndromes apart.

Reckoning with Homelessness

Author: Kim Hopper
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801471605
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"It must be some kind of experiment or something, to see how long people can live without food, without shelter, without security."—Homeless woman in Grand Central Station Kim Hopper has dedicated his career to trying to address the problem of homelessness in the United States. In this powerful book, he draws upon his dual strengths as anthropologist and advocate to provide a deeper understanding of the roots of homelessness. He also investigates the complex attitudes brought to bear on the issue since his pioneering fieldwork with Ellen Baxter twenty years ago helped put homelessness on the public agenda. Beginning with his own introduction to the problem in New York, Hopper uses ethnography, literature, history, and activism to place homelessness into historical context and to trace the process by which homelessness came to be recognized as an issue. He tells the largely neglected story of homelessness among African Americans and vividly portrays various sites of public homelessness, such as airports. His accounts of life on the streets make for powerful reading.

Illness Behavior

Author: Sean McHugh
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1468452576
Format: PDF, ePub
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In August, 1985, the 2nd International Conference on Illness Behaviour was held in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The first International Conference took place one year previous in Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. This book is based on the proceedings of the second conference. The purpose behind this conference was to facilitate the development of a single integrated model to account for illness experience and presentation. A major focus of the conference was to outline methodological issues related to current behaviour research. A multidiscipl~nary approach was emphasized because of the bias that collaborative efforts are likely to be the most successful in achieving greater understanding of illness behaviour. Significant advances in our knowledge are occurring in all areas of the biological and social sciences, albeit more slowly in the latter areas. Marked specialization in each of these areas has lead to greater difficulty in integrating new knowledge with that of other areas and the development of a meaningful cohesive model to which all can relate. Thus there is a major need for forums such as that provided by this conference.