The Revenge of Geography

Author: Robert D. Kaplan
Publisher: Random House Incorporated
ISBN: 1400069831
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
The best-selling author of Balkan Ghosts presents a timely and provocative response to The World Is Flat that draws on the insights of leading geographers and geopolitical thinkers to present a holistic interpretation of the next cycle of conflict throughout Eurasia that considers such topics as European debt, Chinese power and the role of Iran.

Iron Curtain

Author: Anne Applebaum
Publisher: Anchor
ISBN: 0385536437
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
In the long-awaited follow-up to her Pulitzer Prize-winning Gulag, acclaimed journalist Anne Applebaum delivers a groundbreaking history of how Communism took over Eastern Europe after World War II and transformed in frightening fashion the individuals who came under its sway. At the end of World War II, the Soviet Union to its surprise and delight found itself in control of a huge swath of territory in Eastern Europe. Stalin and his secret police set out to convert a dozen radically different countries to Communism, a completely new political and moral system. In Iron Curtain, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Anne Applebaum describes how the Communist regimes of Eastern Europe were created and what daily life was like once they were complete. She draws on newly opened East European archives, interviews, and personal accounts translated for the first time to portray in devastating detail the dilemmas faced by millions of individuals trying to adjust to a way of life that challenged their every belief and took away everything they had accumulated. Today the Soviet Bloc is a lost civilization, one whose cruelty, paranoia, bizarre morality, and strange aesthetics Applebaum captures in the electrifying pages of Iron Curtain.

An Empire Wilderness

Author: Robert D. Kaplan
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0804153493
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
Having reported on some of the world's most violent, least understood regions in his bestsellers Balkan Ghosts and The Ends of the Earth, Robert Kaplan now returns to his native land, the United States of America. Traveling, like Tocqueville and John Gunther before him, through a political and cultural landscape in transition, Kaplan reveals a nation shedding a familiar identity as it assumes a radically new one. An Empire Wilderness opens in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, where the first white settlers moved into Indian country and where Manifest Destiny was born. In a world whose future conflicts can barely be imagined, it is also the place where the army trains its men to fight the next war. "A nostalgic view of the United States is deliberately cultivated here," Kaplan writes, "as if to bind the uncertain future to a reliable past." From Fort Leavenworth, Kaplan travels west to the great cities of the heartland--to St. Louis, once a glorious shipping center expected to outshine imperial Rome and now touted, with its desolate inner city and miles of suburban gated communities, as "the most average American city." Kaplan continues west to Omaha; down through California; north from Mexico, across Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas; up to Montana and Canada, and back through Oregon. He visits Mexican border settlements and dust-blown county sheriffs' offices, Indian reservations and nuclear bomb plants, cattle ranches in the Oklahoma Panhandle, glacier-mantled forests in the Pacific Northwest, swanky postsuburban sprawls and grim bus terminals, and comes, at last, to the great battlefield at Vicksburg, Mississippi, where an earlier generation of Americans gave their lives for their vision of an American future. But what, if anything, he asks, will today's Americans fight and die for? At Vicksburg Kaplan contemplates the new America through which he has just traveled--an America of sharply polarized communities that draws its population from pools of talent far beyond its borders; an America where the distance between winners and losers grows exponentially as corporations assume gov-ernment functions and the wealthy find themselves more closely linked to their business associates in India and China than to their poorer neighbors a few miles away; an America where old loyalties and allegiances are vanishing and new ones are only beginning to emerge. The new America he found is in the pages of this book. Kaplan gives a precise and chilling vision of how the most successful nation the world has ever known is entering the final, and highly uncertain, phase of its history.

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea

Author: Jules Verne
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
An adaptation of the nineteenth-century science fiction tale of an electric submarine, its eccentric captain, and the undersea world, which anticipated many of the scientific achievements of the twentieth century.

Margellos World Republic of Letters

Author: Lope de Vega
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300168723
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
Lope de Vega "single-handedly created the Spanish national theatre," writes Roberto Gonzalez Echevarria in the introduction to this new translation of "Fuenteovejuna." Often compared to Shakespeare, Moliere, and Racine, Lope is widely considered the greatest of all Spanish playwrights, and "Fuenteovejuna" ("The Sheep Well") is among the most important Spanish Golden Age plays. Written in 1614, " Fuenteovejuna" centers on the decision of an entire village to admit to the premeditated murder of a tyrannical ruler. Lope masterfully employs the tragicomic conventions of the Spanish "comedia" as he leavens the central dilemma of the peasant lovers, Laurencia and Frondoso, with the shenanigans of Mengo, the "gracioso" or clown. Based on an actual historical incident, "Fuenteovejuna" offers a paean to collective responsibility and affirmation of the timeless values of justice and kindness. Translator G. J. Racz preserves the nuanced voice and structure of Lope de Vega's text in this first English translation in analogical meter and rhyme. Roberto Gonzalez Echevarria surveys the history of "Fuenteovejuna," as well as Lope's enormous literary output and indelible cultural imprint. Racz's compelling translation and Gonzalez Echevarria's rich framework bring this timeless Golden Age drama alive for a new generation of readers and performers.

Das Nibelungenlied

Author: Burton Raffel
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300125986
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
It portrays the existential struggles and downfall of an entire people, the Burgundians, in a military conflict with the Huns and their king."--Jacket.

The Kite Runner

Author: Khaled Hosseini
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 140882485X
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
Over 21 million copies sold worldwide

An Aqueous Territory

Author: Ernesto Bassi
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822373734
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
In An Aqueous Territory Ernesto Bassi traces the configuration of a geographic space he calls the transimperial Greater Caribbean between 1760 and 1860. Focusing on the Caribbean coast of New Granada (present-day Colombia), Bassi shows that the region's residents did not live their lives bounded by geopolitical borders. Rather, the cross-border activities of sailors, traders, revolutionaries, indigenous peoples, and others reflected their perceptions of the Caribbean as a transimperial space where trade, information, and people circulated, both conforming to and in defiance of imperial regulations. Bassi demonstrates that the islands, continental coasts, and open waters of the transimperial Greater Caribbean constituted a space that was simultaneously Spanish, British, French, Dutch, Danish, Anglo-American, African, and indigenous. Exploring the "lived geographies" of the region's dwellers, Bassi challenges preconceived notions of the existence of discrete imperial spheres and the inevitable emergence of independent nation-states while providing insights into how people envision their own futures and make sense of their place in the world.

Around the World in Eighty Days

Author: Jules Verne
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
One of the most popular novels in Jules Verne's Voyages Extraordinaires series, this book tracks the adventures of affluent Englishman Phileas Fogg, who attempts to swiftly span the globe with his hapless French valet, Passepartout. A case of mistaken identity leads a determined sleuth named Fix to purse Fogg on his trek, which consists primarily of boat and train travel. Published in 1873, the story depicts Fogg and Passepartout at odds with their unfamiliar surroundings while taking in various international wonders.

Love in the Time of Cholera

Author: Gabriel García Márquez
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 1101911115
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
AVAILABLE FOR THE FIRST TIME IN eBOOK! In their youth, Florentino Ariza and Fermina Daza fall passionately in love. When Fermina eventually chooses to marry a wealthy, well-born doctor, Florentino is devastated, but he is a romantic. As he rises in his business career he whiles away the years in 622 affairs--yet he reserves his heart for Fermina. Her husband dies at last, and Florentino purposefully attends the funeral. Fifty years, nine months, and four days after he first declared his love for Fermina, he will do so again.